Economics (ECON)

Courses

ECON 1010. Economics of Social Issues. 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. Does not fulfill School of Business degree requirements. Offers an introduction to the economic theories of scarcity, consumer and producer choice, competition and monopoly, labor, capital, resource markets, antitrust and other government regulations, and income distribution in order to understand and appreciate the ideas, processes, dynamics, and institutions that underlie the social and economic system. FA, SP.

ECON 1740. Economic History of the U.S. 3 Hours.

Fulfills the General Education American Institutions (Utah State Code R470) requirement. Surveys the development of economic institutions and process of material growth in the United States from colonial times to the present. Employs lectures, discussion, audio visual materials, and various other instructional methods. Successful students will demonstrate a reasonable understanding of the history, principles, form of government, and economic system of the United States, as well as an appreciation of the American heritage and the responsibilities of American citizens. Prerequisite: Reading placement score of 17 or higher, or ENGL 1470. SP.

ECON 2010. Micro Economics. 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. Required of students pursuing majors in the School of Business. Offers an introduction to the economic theories of scarcity, consumer and producer choice, competition and monopoly, labor, capital, and resource markets, antitrust and other government regulation, and income distribution in order to understand and appreciate the ideas, processes, dynamics, and institutions that underlie the social and economic system. FA, SP, SU.

ECON 2020. Macro Economics. 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. Required of students pursuing majors in the School of Business. Offers an introduction to the economic theories of scarcity, supply and demand, the role of government, international trade and finance, inflation, depression, economic growth, and government debt in order to understand and appreciate the ideas, processes, dynamics, and institutions that make the American economy work. FA, SP, SU.

ECON 2990. Seminar in Economics. 1-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, students demand some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable-credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit hour offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other non-traditional instruction methods. Note that this course is an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

ECON 3010. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the following topics: basic theory of consumer behavior, production and costs, partial equilibrium analysis of pricing in competitive, monopoly, monopolistic and oligopoly markets. The course will also incorporate risk analysis. Using economic theory, statistical analysis and optimization methods, students solve management problems relating to pricing, production and distribution, innovation and technological change, and cost. Prerequisites: ECON 2010 and ECON 2020 (Grade C- or higher); and MATH 1110 or MATH 1210 (Grade C- or higher). FA.

ECON 3020. Intermediate Macroeconomics. 3 Hours.

Explores the macroeconomic environment within which business decisions are made. Source data is used to obtain measures of the economy. Macroeconomic theory underlying the conduct of monetary and fiscal policy is analyzed. The course expands on introductory topics of national income, economic growth, the monetary system, inflation, business cycle theory, unemployment, government policy, the trade balance, and exchange rate systems. Prerequisites: ECON 2010 and ECON 2020 (Grade C- or higher); and MATH 1100 or MATH 1210 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

ECON 3500. International Economics. 3 Hours.

For students in the School of Business. Covers economic activity that crosses a national border, including the history of and current movement of capital and labor across international borders. Since international transactions are beyond the reach of national laws and policies, international economics must also include an overview of the international institutions' practices that regulate the flow of goods, resources, and money between countries. Prerequisite: ECON 2020. FA.