Humanities (HUM)

Courses

HUM 1000R. Dixie Forum. 1 Hour.

For all students. Introduces students to a variety of speakers presenting lectures or performances on artistic, historic, business, scientific, and other academic topics. Successful completers will attend at least 10 presentations and write brief response papers for each. Repeatable up to 8 credits subject to graduation restrictions. FA, SP.

HUM 1001. FYE: Humanities. 1 Hour.

Designed for freshmen majoring in English or other humanities disciplines, including English, foreign language, and philosophy, this class also helps undecided humanities majors choose a field of study. Assists students to adapt to university life and become integrated into Dixie State University. Students will refine academic skills; create and foster social networks; learn about university resources; and explore degree options, current job opportunities, and various career paths. Multiple listed with all other sections of First Year Experience (all 1001 courses, ENGR 1000). Students may only take one FYE course for credit. FA, SP.

HUM 1010. Humanities Through the Arts. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Literature/Humanities General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For students in all disciplines with an interest in exploring the interrelationship of art, literature, music, philosophy, architecture, sculpture, and other art forms. Enhances appreciation and understanding of all forms of creative human expression. Includes readings, films, group discussions, lectures, and written responses to the humanities through papers and exams. Successful students will demonstrate skill on exams and in discussing, reading and writing about the humanities. FA, SP, SU.

HUM 1040. Non-Western Humanities through the Arts. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Literature/Humanities General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For students in all disciplines with an interest in exploring the interrelationship of non-western art, literature, music, philosophy, architecture, sculpture, and other art forms. Studies the major arts of Eastern cultures in their historical, religious and philosophical settings. Enhances appreciation and understanding of all forms of creative human expression in non-western contexts. Includes readings, films, group discussions, lectures, and written responses to the humanities through papers and exams. Successful students will demonstrate skill on exams and in discussing, reading and writing about the humanities, or as interest demands. FA, SP.

HUM 2500. Period Studies [Period]. 3 Hours.

Takes an introductory, but analytically in-depth approach to the study of a particular period within the humanities (such as the medieval world, Romanticism, or Modernism). Involves study of more than one art form (e.g., music, art, and literature) or discipline (such as literature and philosophy) from the chosen period. Topics vary. Repeatable, with different topics, with a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HUM 2600. Area Studies in Humanities: [Area]. 3 Hours.

Takes an introductory, but analytically in-depth approach to the study of the humanities produced within a particular geographical area (such as the Soviet Union or Britain). Involves study of more than one art form (e.g., music, art, and literature) or discipline (such as literature and philosophy) from the chosen location. Topics vary. Repeatable, with different topics, with a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HUM 2990. Seminar In Humanities. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

HUM 3050. Gothic Humanities. 3 Hours.

Explores expressions of goth, gothic and gothicism in Western civilization within various artistic disciplines, including architecture, literature, film and fashion. Specific topics include the role of the Goths in the fall of Rome, medieval architecture, the gothic novel, Victorian medievalism, gothic film and fashion, and present-day, pop-culture gothic iterations, including zombies and vampires. The course aims to discuss the function of these darker artistic expressions and their relevance within the human experience. Prerequisite: Advanced standing.

HUM 3070. The Global Arts: 1900-Today. 3 Hours.

Methods and practices of the discipline are introduced, centered on contemporary issues of globalization, media and the arts, memory and history, and cultural identity formation. Explores the interrelationship of all forms of creative human expression, including art, music, literature, film, architecture, and sculpture. Taught on as needed basis.

HUM 3500. Topics in Humanities: [Topic]. 3 Hours.

Takes an in-depth theoretical and research-based approach to the study of a particular topic within the humanities. Involves study of more than one art form (e.g., music, art, and literature) or discipline (such as literature and philosophy) as related to the chosen topic. Topics vary. Repeatable, with different topics, with a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HUM 4000. Foundations of Dual Language Immersion Education. 3 Hours.

This course is for those seeking Dual Immersion Education endorsement. Emphasizes the theoretical and practical background about Dual Immersion Education. Overview of Dual Language Immersion Education, program models, teaching and learning issues in Dual Language Immersion Programs, and challenges of Dual Language Immersion Programs will be addressed to assist the success of prospective immersion teachers in the classroom. Eligible languages include Spanish, French, Mandarin Chinese, German, and Portuguese. Dual listed with SPAN 4000 and EDUC 4700 (students may only take one course for credit). Prerequisite: Must be admitted to DSU teacher preparation program or have a Utah teaching license. Instructor permission required. FA, SP, SU (Even years).

HUM 4700. Teaching Modern Languages. 3 Hours.

Designed for students intending to teach Modern Languages at primary or secondary schools. Students learn about a wide variety of approaches and methods of language teaching: from teaching trends in the early 20th century to current communicative approaches, as well as a broad range of alternative methods (e.g. Total Physical Response, Suggestopedia, Community Language Learning, Multiple Intelligences, Competency-Based Language Teaching etc.) Also looks critically at traditional dichotomies: explicit versus implicit language instruction, grammar versus communication, foreign language versus mother tongue. The concepts of language awareness, language learning reflection, and learner autonomy will be examined as indicators of a shift in language teaching towards learner centered approaches. In addition, we will also discuss the implications for teachers of recent concerns about standards, assessment, and continuing professional development. FA.