Accounting & Finance

300 Udvar-Hazy Business Bldg.
(435) 652-7652
http://dixie.edu/business/
http://accounting.dixie.edu/

To find faculty & staff phone numbers and email addresses, please consult the University Directory.

Department Chair
Nate Staheli, Ph.D., M.Acc., C.P.A

Department Secretary
Amber Volpa

Advisors
Yvonne Strahle

Jessica White

School of Business Dean
Kyle Wells, Ph.D.

Administrative Specialist
Lory Mattucci

Program Description

The top priority of the DSU Accounting Department and it’s tremendous faculty is to facilitate the development of value-added accounting graduates.  Unlike large research institutions, the mission of the Udvar-Hazy School of Business focuses on teaching.  Almost all of our full-time business school faculty hold earned doctorate degrees, most have extensive business experience, and all maintain their professional competencies through ongoing research and/or pedagogical innovation.  DSU students have greater access to full-time faculty than at most major universities and as a result, our graduates acquire value-added skills and applicable knowledge in highly interactive, student-oriented learning environments.

Opportunities for practical learning are provided by a faculty rich in accounting experience. Accomplished faculty teach accounting concepts in the context of their application, transcending DSU’s accounting education from merely theoretical to an applied, heuristic learning experience. DSU Accounting students have been involved in a number of accounting projects for local businesses. The accounting department established an “accounting incubator” that provides their students with opportunities to analyze and advise local businesses. All accounting students also have the opportunity to serve the local community and strengthen their tax preparation knowledge and  skills through participation in the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program.

Mission

The mission of the Udvar-Hazy School of Business at Dixie State University is to prepare its students for successful employment, advanced learning, and service to community. We are committed to providing an environment that embraces experiential learning, stimulates academic excellence, and incorporates ethical considerations.

Baccalaureate Programs

Students who pursue the Bachelor of Science in Accounting degree at Dixie State University take a variety of Accounting courses as well as learn the ability to track or record business transactions and provide the information that managers need to make informed business decisions. Students also get involved in learning tax implications for individual and business entities. Students in this major take a series of Accounting requirements including Financial and Managerial Accounting, Cost Accounting, Tax Accounting I & II and Auditing, among others. The degree is also an excellent choice for students wishing to pursue a Master of Accountancy (M.Acc.) degree.

Program Goals

  1. Provide students with accounting and core business knowledge and skills that enable attainment of advanced accounting degrees and success in a rapidly changing, competitive professional environment. (Core Theme One – A Culture of Learning)

  2. Develop students’ awareness of and analytical and decision-making skills regarding business ethical issues. (Core Theme Two – A Culture of Value)

  3. Establish partnerships with the community and alumni to provide an education that responds to local and industry needs and affords valuable, applied learning opportunities and community engagement. (Core Theme Three – A Culture of Community)

  4. Employ highly qualified faculty members who foster open, innovative, analytical, and student-focused learning environments. Support academically and professionally active faculty who model continuous improvement in their practice and service. (Core Theme One – A Culture of Learning)

Master of Accountancy Program

Differential tuition

Course Prefixes

  • ACCT, FIN

Facilities

The Accounting program is housed in a modern, student-friendly building equipped with the latest technology available.

Computer Requirement

Students in Business programs are required to have their own personal computer for use throughout their degree program. Laptop computers are recommended and all computers must be capable of running specialized business applications required in various courses, as well as Microsoft Office Suite.
 

Degrees & Certificates

Accounting


Finance

Admission Requirements MAcc

Applicants are expected to meet the following minimum criteria:

  • Bachelor’s degree from regionally accredited institution or the equivalent for international students.
  • Minimum overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0.
  • Minimum GPA of 3.0 in upper-division accounting courses
  • Foreign students must complete the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

The admission committee may waive the GMAT and/or TOEFL requirements if students supply sufficient evidence of preparation for the MAcc program for Dixie State University undergraduate students only.  Meeting the minimum requirements for admissions does not guarantee a student will be admitted.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify accounting, tax, auditing, and ethical issues in structured and unstructured fact-based situations.
    1. Students will identify the problem and acknowledge reasons for enduring uncertainty and absence of a single "correct" solution.
    2. Students will identify relevant information and uncertainties embedded in the information.
  2. Perform and gather research using the professional body of knowledge in the accounting discipline.
    1. Students will interpret information by:
      1. Organizing information in meaningful ways that encompass problem complexities.
      2. Qualitatively interpreting evidence from a variety of points of view.
      3. Recognizing and controlling for personal bias.
      4. Articulating assumptions and reasoning associated with alternative points of view.
  3. Use a range of techniques to perform analysis, synthesize information, and draw conclusions.
    1. After thorough analysis, students will develop and use reasonable guidelines for prioritizing issues and choosing among options
    2. Students will efficiently implement conclusions, involving others as needed.
  4. Communicate effectively in quantitative and qualitative terms through writing and speaking.
    1. Students will acknowledge and explain limitations of endorsed solutions.
    2. Students will integrate skills in on-going processes for generating and using information to monitor strategies and make reasonable modifications.
  5. Provide service in the local community through applied learning opportunities and community engagement.
    1. Students will spend time in the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program, assisting individuals in the community with their federal and state tax return preparation needs.
    2. Students will become VITA certified and will partner with the IRS and the Five Counties community organization to provide tax related services.
    3. Students will use their accounting knowledge and value-added skills to assist small business clients with entity discussion and selection, QuickBooks setup and training, income, sales, and payroll tax research and preparation, and financial statement preparation and analysis.
  6. Accept the obligation to act in a way that will serve the public interest, honor the public trust, and demonstrate commitment to professionalism.
    1. Students will recognize their responsibility to the collective well-being of the community of people and institutions that the CPA profession serves.
    2. Students will understand how their actions affect others and learn to take responsibility for their own actions.

Accounting Career Information

Job Outlook*

Employment of accountants and auditors is projected to grow 11 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. In general, employment growth of accountants and auditors is expected to be closely tied to the health of the overall economy. As the economy grows, more workers should be needed to prepare and examine financial records.

Salary Range*

The median annual wage for accountants and auditors was $67,190 in May 2015. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $41,400, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $118,930.

Career Strategies

In addition to the required coursework in Business, students can do the following to enhance their career opportunities:

  • Gain relevant experience through internships or related part-time employment
  • Develop good writing and oral communication skills
  • Develop strong interpersonal skills
  • Develop excellent computer application skills
  • Develop analytical, critical thinking, problem-solving skills
  • Maintain a high grade point average
  • Pass the C.P.A. Exam
  • Earn a Master's Degree in Accounting (MAcc) or (MTax)

Career Opportunities*

Business and Accounting graduates are high in demand in a variety of industries because they typically develop transferrable skills in critical thinking, problem diagnosis and solving, quantitative and analytical skills, and abstract thinking. A brief sampling of possible careers related to accounting includes:

  • Public Accounting
  • Management Accounting
  • Government Accounting
  • Internal Auditors
  • Accounting Education

Accounting Courses

ACCT 1010. Applied Business Accounting. 2 Hours.

For non-accounting majors, introduces basic bookkeeping practices through the complete accounting cycle for hospitality and service companies. FA, SP.

ACCT 2010. Financial Accounting. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing majors and emphases in the School of Business, and open to other interested students. Introduces basic concepts of financial accounting, covering complete accounting cycle for service and merchandise companies, including depreciation, accounts receivable, and inventory. Course fee required. FA, SP, SU.

ACCT 2020. Managerial Accounting. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing majors and emphases in the School of Business, and open to other interested students. Introduction to managerial accounting principles, including product costing, cost-volume profit analysis, profit planning, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisites: ACCT 2010; AND CIS 1200 OR CIS 1201. FA, SP, SU.

ACCT 3000. Accounting for Management. 4 Hours.

Covers basic concepts and principles of financial and managerial accounting, focusing on the complete accounting cycle for service and merchandise companies, including depreciation, accounts receivable, inventory, product costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, profit planning, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. Does not fulfill pre-Business or pre-Accounting requirements. Prerequisite: CIS 2010. Offered based upon sufficient student need.

ACCT 3005. Accounting Essentials Boot Camp. 1 Hour.

The one-credit Accounting 3005, Accounting Essentials Boot Camp, course has been designed to help students develop a sufficient working knowledge of the Accounting Cycle to prepare them for the more in-depth study of the Accounting Cycle featured in Intermediate I (Accounting 3010). FA, SP.

ACCT 3010. Intermediate Accounting I. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing a degree or emphasis in Accounting. Covers conceptual framework of accounting; reviews the accounting process; reviews accounting statements including the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows, and includes an in-depth coverage of revenue recognition, accounting changes and error correction, and financial statement analysis. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ACCT 2010 (Grade B+ or higher) within two years of enrollment in this course; AND ACCT 2020; AND Advanced standing. FA, SP.

ACCT 3020. Intermediate Accounting II. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing a degree or emphasis in Accounting. Covers accounting for current and long-term assets, including accounts receivable, inventories, operating assets, and investments; accounting for current and long-term liabilities, including contingent liabilities, debt securities, and leases; and accounting for equity transactions, including capital stock issuance and reacquisition, stock rights and options, and dividends. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ACCT 3010; AND Advanced standing. FA, SP.

ACCT 3300. Cost Accounting. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing a degree or emphasis in Accounting. Covers the analysis of costs in a business organization for both internal and external use by management. Includes job order and product costing, standard variances analysis, profit performance analysis, labor costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, and capital building. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ACCT 2020; AND Advanced standing. FA, SP.

ACCT 3400. Tax Accounting I. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing a degree or emphasis in Accounting. Covers current federal income tax laws and the preparation of individual income tax returns, emphasizing analysis and interpretation of tax rules and their practical application as well as researching tax laws and rules. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ACCT 2020; AND Advanced standing. FA, SP.

ACCT 3440. Tax Practicum I. 3 Hours.

Required for Accounting majors. Gives Accounting students the opportunity to refine their interpersonal skills and apply tax concepts from the Tax Accounting I course as they meet with clients to prepare their tax returns in real time with state-of-the-art, Internet-based tax preparation software as part of the VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) program. Students are expected to meet with clients outside of the regularly scheduled Monday training classes at least two times per week. Course fee required. Prerequisite: ACCT 3400 (can be concurrently enrolled). SP.

ACCT 3500. Accting Practicum Techniques. 3 Hours.

Required for students pursuing a degree in Accounting. Provides hands-on instruction using QuickBooks software to prepare financial statements and related analysis. Payroll tax compliance, reporting, and planning will be covered, with emphasis on interpretation and practical application. Designed to provide Accounting majors with skills needed in ACCT 4600. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ACCT 3020, AND ACCT 4400. Corequisite: ACCT 4400. FA, SP.

ACCT 4030. Advanced Accounting. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing a degree or emphasis in Accounting. Covers the nature and financial reporting aspects of these complex business transactions, including accounting for business combinations and consolidations, joint ventures and foreign currency translations and segment reporting, as well as the unique accounting and financial reporting issues facing not-for-profit organizations and governmental entities. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ACCT 3020; AND Advanced standing. FA, SP.

ACCT 4100. Auditing. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing a degree or emphasis in Accounting. Covers auditing standards, internal accounting, control systems, compliance and substantive audit procedures applied to accounts and transaction cycles, and audit reports. Reviews the auditing concepts of materiality and risk, types of evidence and documentation, and introduces the ethical and legal responsibilities of the Certified Public Accountant. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ACCT 3010; AND Advanced standing. FA, SP.

ACCT 4400. Tax Accounting II. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing a degree in Accounting. Examines concepts and methods of determining the federal tax liability of corporations, S-corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts with special attention to the application of the law using electronic practitioner research tax databases and tax return preparation software. Course fee required. Prerequisites: ACCT 3400; AND Advanced standing. FA, SP.

ACCT 4440. Tax Practicum II. 2 Hours.

The Tax Practicum II class gives Accounting students who provided highly meritorious service during the first VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) season an opportunity to return for a second VITA season to participate as tax-return reviewers. This course is an elective course and requires instructor permission to attend. Prerequisites: ACCT 3440 AND Instructor permission. SP.

ACCT 4600. Accounting Practicum. 3 Hours.

Required for students pursuing a degree in Accounting. Provides an exceptional learning environment that places students in real-life, small business accounting practice and advising setting. Commercial accounting and tax software will be used to prepare financial statements and analysis and in tax compliance, return filing, and planning. Prerequisite: ACCT 3500. FA, SP.

ACCT 4890. Accounting Internship I. 1-3 Hours.

Internship experience for students pursuing a degree or emphasis in Accounting. Variable credit 1.0 - 3.0. Prerequisites: ACCT 2020; AND Advanced standing; AND Instructor permission. FA, SP, SU.

ACCT 4891. Accounting Internship II. 1-3 Hours.

Internship experience for students pursuing a degree or emphasis in Accounting. Variable credit 1.0 - 3.0. Prerequisites: ACCT 4890; AND Instructor permission. FA, SP, SU.

ACCT 6010. Accounting Professionalism, Communication and Ethics. 3 Hours.

Develops team building skills and accounting professionalism important for succeeding within the accounting professional environment. In addition, this course will focus on improving business presentation skills with oral and written communication. The course will also introduce basic behavioral or communication skills needed to manage yourself and relationship with others in organizations. The development of professional ethics and values will be stressed and will compromise a minimum of 1/3 of the material in this course. Prerequisite: Acceptance into MAcc Program. SU.

ACCT 6110. Financial Accounting and Reporting. 3 Hours.

This course will cover the hypothetical, conceptual and pragmatic principles with form the general frame of reference for financial accounting and reporting. Pronouncements issued by FASB and predecessor standard-setting bodies will be researched as well as current accounting issues. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the MAcc Program. SU.

ACCT 6120. Business Environment and Concepts. 3 Hours.

This course will cover knowledge of corporate governance, economic concepts essential to understanding the global business environment and its impact on an entity's business strategy and financial risk management; financial management processes; information systems and communication; strategic planning; and operations management as it pertains to business environmental concepts of the CPA exam. Prerequisite: Acceptance into MAcc program. FA.

ACCT 6130. Auditing and Attestation. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on various theoretical and practical applications of the changing audit discipline. Authoritative attestation and auditing literature is studied as well as recent PCAOB pronouncements. Case studies will be used to consider risk assessment, independence issues, internal control evaluation, and audit processes. Prerequisite: Acceptance into MAcc program. FA.

ACCT 6140. Laws and Regulations. 3 Hours.

This course will include coverage of current legal and regulatory issues applicable to practicing accountants. Common law and statutory liability, UCC and contracts, and antitrust regulations will be covered. Taxation of property transactions, individual and entities will also be covered. Prerequisite: Acceptance into MAcc program. SP.

ACCT 6200. Tax Research and Communications. 3 Hours.

This course examines research methods used for Federal Taxation. Topics include ethics, tax research methodology, primary sources of law, and secondary sources of law and tax practice. Students will use electronic databases and other library resources to research fact patterns. Prerequisite: Acceptance into MAcc program. FA.

ACCT 6210. Advanced Individual Taxation. 3 Hours.

This course will emphasize topics affecting high-wealth individuals such as taxation of investments, charitable giving, alternative minimum tax, foreign income and assets, and compensation and retirement planning. Prerequisite: Acceptance into MAcc program. FA.

ACCT 6220. Advanced Pass through Entities. 3 Hours.

This course involves federal taxation of entities that pass through certain income and deductions to its owners with primary emphasis on partnerships, S Corporations, trusts and estates. Some attention will also be given to transfer taxes in the form of estate and gift taxation. Prerequisite: Acceptance into MAcc program. FA.

ACCT 6230. Estates, Gifts and Multijurisdictional Tax. 3 Hours.

This course examines the details of three Federal transfer taxes: the estate tax, gift tax and generation skipping tax. Topics will include transfers subject to the gift tax, valuation of gifts, gift tax exclusion, gift splitting, the gross estate, deductions for transfer taxes, life insurance subject to estate tax and the determination and payment of the three taxes. This course will also cover global, state, and local taxation issues. It will include, but not be limited to, transfer pricing, foreign tax credits, subpart F, tax treaties, different types of taxes, and nexus. Students will be expected to prepare estate and gift tax returns, multi-jurisdictional tax returns, and research issues related to transfer taxes and present topics to the class. Prerequisite: Acceptance into MAcc program. SP.

ACCT 6310. Advanced Cost Accounting. 3 Hours.

This course reviews the development and use of management accounting information systems in planning and control activities. The course will prepare students for completing the 2nd part of the CMA designation and will use case studies of actual companies. It will focus on new management accounting practices adopted by the innovative companies around the world. Prerequisite: Acceptance into MAcc program. SP.

ACCT 6900. Graduate Accounting Internship/Work Experience. 3 Hours.

A significant professional-level field experience in the area of accounting or taxation. The student will be counseled and supervised as he/she applies and integrates the knowledge and skills obtained through MAcc. Prerequisite: Acceptance into MAcc program. FA, SP, SU.

Finance Courses

FIN 1750. Personal Finance: Financial Citizenship in Social and Economic Systems (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Society is placing increasing responsibility on individuals for their financial well-being (e.g., retirement, health care). This course is devoted to building quantitative skills associated with individual financial decision making and analyzing the connection between individual decisions and societal well-being. This course seeks to address the "how" and "why" in personal financial decisions. Topics covered include credit/debt, property insurance, saving, and investing. The course will draw on multiple disciplines. Economics, finance, and applied mathematics are directly addressed. Public financial policy in areas of political science, law, and psychology are also discussed. FA, SP.

FIN 3150. Managerial Finance I. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing majors and emphases in the School of Business. Covers fundamentals necessary to analyze financial statements, including statement of cash flows and financial ratio analysis, identifying financial management goals, time value of money, valuation, risk and return characteristics, and capital and cash budgeting. Prerequisites: ACCT 2010 and STAT 2040 and ECON 2010. FA, SP.

FIN 3200. Money, Banking, & Credit. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. Covers monetary standards, organization and functioning of the credit system and the Federal Reserve System, problems of money, prices, and credit control, while emphasizing recent monetary and banking trends. Prerequisite: FIN 3150 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA.

FIN 3500. Financial Negotiations. 3 Hours.

For students in the School of Business. Designed to teach students to use an integrated process for strategically planning for, conducting, and debriefing individual and group negotiations while assessing the impact of stakeholder positions, interests, and relationships. Prerequisite: FIN 3150. SP.

FIN 3750. Introduction to Investments. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. Highlights investment markets, transactions, return and risk measures, stock and preferred stock analysis and valuation, mutual funds, portfolio building and management, and derivative securities. Prerequisite: FIN 3150. FA.

FIN 4150. Managerial Finance II. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. In-depth treatment of capital budgeting, project valuation, risk assessment, capital structure, cash flow management, dividend policy, corporate incentive problems, agency theory, and signaling theory. Prerequisite: FIN 3150. SP.

FIN 4180. Entrepreneurial Finance. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. Explores all aspects of consumer and commercial credit management, including personal/consumer loans, mortgages, and credit cards; commercial credit topics such as business credit, factoring, financial analysis and reporting agencies; management of consumer credit by businesses; and credit issuance and collection policies. Prerequisites: ACCT 2020; AND ENGL 2010; AND FIN 3150. SP.

FIN 4300. Real Estate Finance. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. Covers mechanisms of real estate financing, sources of funds and financial institutions, governmental agencies, the framework for urban real estate investment decisions by individuals and institutions, the use of financing techniques, leverage, risk analysis and control, and taxation. Prerequisite: FIN 3150. FA.

FIN 4380. Financial Modeling and Decision Making. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. Applies economic theories to solve various problems in financial management and investments using a hands-on approach in building financial spreadsheet models in Microsoft Excel. Prerequisite: FIN 3150. FA.

FIN 4400. International Finance. 3 Hours.

Required of students pursuing an emphasis in Finance; open to other interested students in the School of Business. A study of the international monetary system in its theoretical and institutional setting, the position of an individual business firm in conducting international trade, and procedures in financing international transactions. Prerequisite: FIN 3150. SP.

FIN 4750. Portfolio Practicum. 3 Hours.

Gives students hands-on money management experience by managing a fund. Major areas of fund management covered will include: portfolio objectives, industry sector analysis, company analysis and valuation, portfolio formation, efficient transactions, performance evaluation, and ethics. Prerequisite: FIN 3750 (Grade B- or higher). SP.

FIN 6380. Financial Modeling and Decision Making. 3 Hours.

Applies economic theories to solve various problems in financial management and investments using a hands-on approach in building financial spreadsheet models in Microsoft Excel. Prerequisites: Acceptance into MAcc program. FA.

Faculty

Department Chair

Nate Staheli, Ph.D., M.Acc., C.P.A.

Associate Professor

Steven Day, M.Acc., C.P.A.

Nate Staheli, Ph.D., M.Acc., C.P.A.

Assistant Professors

Derrick Esplin, Ph.D., M.Acc., C.P.A., C.M.A.

Todd Hess, M.Acc., C.P.A.

Ross Johnston, Ph.D., C.P.A.