Criminal Justice

University Plaza, Building D
(435) 652-7881
http://socialscience.dixie.edu/criminal-justice/

To find faculty & staff phone numbers and email addresses, please consult the University Directory.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Department Chair
Robert Carlson, Ph.D.

Criminal Justice Faculty
Gary Cantrell, Ph.D., Digital Forensics Emphasis Coordinator
Lish Harris, Ph.D., Criminology Emphasis Coordinator
R.C. Morris, Ph.D.

Administrative Assistant for Social & Behavioral Sciences
Ginger Alldredge

Lecturer/Advisor
Kamil Taylor-Diggs

Dean
Richard Featherstone, Ph.D.

Administrative Specialist
Christine Arlotti

Program Description

Criminal Justice is the application of law, and the social and natural sciences to the societal phenomenon of crime and delinquency. The discipline addresses definitions, causation, prevention, legal processes, and treatment of offenders.

Many career opportunities for students trained in Criminal Justice are available. Opportunities exist in various law enforcement and governmental agencies including DEA agent, FBI agent, corrections officer, security officer, private investigator, game law enforcement officer, immigration officer, Alcohol/Tobacco/Firearms inspector, United States trustee, Internal Revenue officer, Border Patrol agent, Consumer Safety inspector, and other related fields.

The Criminal Justice program offers baccalaureate degrees with emphases in Criminology or Digital Forensics. Both emphases are available in either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. In addition, students may pursue an Associate of Science in Criminal Justice degree, a Criminal Justice emphasis as part of the Integrated Studies baccalaureate degree, or a Certificate of Completion in Computer Forensics.

Dixie State University Computer Crime Institute (DSU-CCI)

The Dixie State University Computer Crime Institute (DSU-CCI) is a unique enterprise providing oversight to operations, projects, and finances involving DSU Criminal Justice faculty and students interfacing with local, state, regional, and national law enforcement officers and programs to educate traditional Criminal Justice majors and provide a new Criminal Justice focus on high tech crime. The Institute educates consumers, law enforcement, and criminal justice students (future law enforcement officers) on identify theft and computer related crimes. The DSU-CCI includes a cyber crime lab that is used to train DSU students and Utah’s local and statewide law enforcement officers in modern techniques necessary for combating the growing incidences of computer-based crime. They learn how to collect online evidence, dissect and analyze storage disks, keep detailed logs, protect the “chain of custody” and present expert testimony in court.

The Institute facilitates cooperation between law enforcement and academia that strengthens the region’s and Utah’s crime fighting efforts. The Institute also provides scholarships for top students and coordinates internships with law enforcement agencies targeting Utah computer crime. This real-life hands-on experience provides DSU students with experience for high level private and government jobs upon graduation. The goal is to provide the criminal justice field with focused graduates who have sufficient computer science skills to effectively meet and stay ahead of the threat.

What is the study of Criminal Justice?

The contemporary field of Criminal Justice is diverse; topics of study include law enforcement, criminal investigation, causes of criminal behavior, corrections, and more. Whether a student desires to enter law enforcement or to pursue a graduate degree in the behavioral sciences, this program intends to offer the appropriate education.

Program Learning Outcomes

DSU Criminal Justice graduates will be able to:

  • Define the major components of the Criminal Justice system and the fundamental processes that take place therein.

Criminology emphasis graduates will be able to:

  • Select primary criminological theories and outline their causal arguments.
  • Employ correct criminological theory to address criminal behavior, crime trends, or Criminal Justice policy/practice.
  • Characterize basic methodological techniques employed in past and current criminological research.
  • Appraise research that illuminates the strengths and weaknesses of current criminal justice policy or research that attempts to reveal the causes of criminal behavior.
  • Apply appropriate research methods to analyze varying criminal behaviors or functions within the Criminal Justice system.

Digital Forensics emphasis graduates will be able to:

  • Understand current technologies, and how these are misused to commit cyber-crime.
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the underlying hardware that facilitates criminal activity in cyber-crime.
  • Apply an understanding of different digital forensic methodologies to the appropriate environments and situation.
  • Identify each phase of the digital forensic process and apply each phase with current technologies in such a manner that will result in admissible evidence.
  • Explore the problems faced by criminal justice professionals through the examination of the yet to be solved challenges resulting from the emergence and proliferation of cyber-crime, and develop plausible solutions.

Course Prefixes

  • CJ

Clubs

The Criminal Justice Club is an active group of students who engage in social and service activities.

Criminology Career Information

Career Strategies

In addition to the required coursework in criminal justice, students can do the following to enhance their career opportunities:

  • Learn to work well with people of diverse backgrounds.
  • Consider learning 2nd language.
  • Maintain a good driving record and a blemish free criminal record.
  • Gain firearms and self-defense training.
  • Develop strong interviewing, research, computer, and writing skills.
  • Obtain training or certifications in first aid, CPR or EMT.
  • Maintain a healthy and physically fit lifestyle.
  • To work with juveniles, gain experience working with youth through sports teams, as a summer camp counselor, in parks and recreation programs or community/religious youth groups.
  • Become familiar with the legal system and observe courtroom proceedings. Obtain experience through volunteering, practicum and/or internship opportunities.

Career Opportunities*

Career opportunities include local and federal law enforcement, corrections, and the courts. Criminal justice studies can also assist students in pursuit of graduate degrees that include other disciplines such as psychology, sociology, public administration, social work, counseling, and law.

Job Outlook*

Employment opportunities in law enforcement and corrections are very competitive on the local, state and Federal level. Career opportunities for attorneys will be competitive for the next several years.

Salary Range*

Salaries vary by geographic location, years of experience, and career speciality. For example, Police and sheriff’s patrol officers have median annual wages of $55,010, but salaries differ in various regions. Median annual wages of correctional officers and jailers are $39,020.

*

From the Occupational Outlook Handbook

Digital Forensics Career Information

Career Strategies

  • Maintain a good driving record and blemish-free criminal record.
  • Develop strong research and writing skills.
  • Develop excellent computer skills in networking, programming, or system administration
  • Become familiar with the legal system, observe courtroom proceedings.
  • Obtain experience through volunteering, practicum and/or internship opportunities.
  • Keep up-to-date on current technology.

Career Opportunities*

Essentially all criminal activity, in one way or another, will at some point produce evidence. Business and industry use digital forensics to identify property theft, fraud, network and computer intrusions and unauthorized use of computers and other digital media. Law enforcement agencies use digital forensics to gather digital evidence for a variety of crimes including child pornography, fraud, terrorism, extortion, cyber-stalking, money laundering, forgery, and identity theft. The military and government intelligence agencies use digital forensics in internal investigations and to gather intelligence information from computers captured during military actions.

Job Outlook*

Vast opportunities are available to individuals who are well-trained in the burgeoning field of digital forensics.

Salary Range*

Median annual wages of salaried private detectives and investigators are $42,870. Salaries for digital forensics specialists in government and corporate positions are higher at just over $50,000, but those positions are highly competitive. Wages of private detectives and investigators vary greatly by employer, specialty, and geographic area.

 

*

From the Occupational Outlook Handbook

Courses

CJ 1001. FYE: Criminal Justice. 1 Hour.

First Year Experience course designed to help freshmen interested in criminal justice become acquainted with the discipline, this course will also help students adapt to university life and become integrated into Dixie State University. Students will refine academic skills; create and foster social networks; learn about university resources; and explore degree options, current job opportunities, and various career paths. Multiple listed with all other sections of First Year Experience (all 1001 courses, ENGR 1000). Students may only take one FYE course for credit. FA, SP.

CJ 1010. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, law, private or industrial security, counseling, or criminology, and persons interested in the functioning of the U. S. criminal justice system. Examines the criminal justice system, police, courts, corrections, and related government functions and agencies. Identifies and explores problems, issues and trends in criminal justice. Uses a variety of teaching methods, including lecture, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. This course is required for the associate's degree in Criminal Justice and prepares students for bachelor's degree work. FA, SP.

CJ 1070. Special Function Officer Training (POST I). 6 Hours.

Restricted to students enrolled in Module I of the law enforcement academy program leading to State certification as a Special Function Officer. Counts as elective credit toward an AS or BS in criminal justice for completion of Module I of the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certification. Course work includes physical training, administration, certification, career orientation, criminal and traffic laws, and the proper means of enforcing them. Ethics and professionalism as well as police community relations are emphasized. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule.

CJ 1080. Law Enforcement Training (POST II), Part I. 6 Hours.

Restricted to students enrolled in Module II of the law enforcement academy program leading to State Certification as a Law Enforcement Officer Training. Counts as elective credit towards an AS or BS in criminal justice for completion of Module II of the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certification. Course includes physical training, completes the first portion of the law enforcement training required by the state of Utah to become law enforcement officer certified. Emphasizes firearms, emergency vehicle operation, and arrest, control techniques. Course fee required. Prerequisite(s): CJ 1070 and instructor permission. SP.

CJ 1090. Law Enforcement Training (POST II), Part II. 7 Hours.

Restricted to students enrolled in Module II of the law enforcement academy program leading to State Certification as a Law Enforcement Officer Training. Counts as elective credit towards an AS or BS in criminal justice for completion of Module II of the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certification. Course includes physical training, completes the second portion of the law enforcement training required by the state of Utah to become law enforcement officer certified. Emphasizes firearms, emergency vehicle operation, and arrest, control techniques. Course fee required. Prerequisite(s): CJ 1080 and instructor permission. SU.

CJ 1300. Intro to Corrections. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, law, or criminology. Examines corrections philosophy, history, punishment of offenders, and rehabilitation. Also identifies problems, issues and trends in the corrections system. Uses lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. Develops a foundation for a career in corrections or law enforcement. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (can be concurrently enrolled); AND CJ 1010. FA.

CJ 1330. Criminal Law. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement; adult or juvenile corrections; law, private or industrial security; or criminology, as well as those who may desire to learn about criminal law in society. Provides a foundational understanding of criminal law, including crimes and defenses, as well as the historical foundation, limits, purposes, and functions of criminal law, using lectures, videos, guest lecturers, and assigned text study. Prerequisite: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 1340. Criminal Investigation. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, or law. Includes interviewing witnesses and suspects; techniques in the collection and preservation of evidence; crime scene processing, including some post-crime scene processing of evidence; follow-up investigation and recent techniques of enhancing the criminal investigation function. Also provides an opportunity for in depth examination of the investigation needs of certain crimes using lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. Prerequisite: ACT score of 28; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 1390. Police Field Operations. 3 Hours.

Provides students with the knowledge needed by patrol and field officers, including an understanding of report writing as well as officer field note taking. Covers interviewing witnesses, search, seizure, arrest, and custody. Course covers Tennessee v. Gardner and the use of force doctrine and how it applies in field operations. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (can be concurrently enrolled); AND CJ 1010. Offered based on sufficient student need.

CJ 1900. Introduction to Computer Related Crime. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course for those students interested in learning about criminal investigations through digital forensics. Introduces computer crime through an overview of the criminal acts that can be committed using a computer or the Internet, and how those acts can be successfully investigated. Also includes the legal aspects of search and seizure, proper procedures for handling digital evidence in relation to the rules of evidence, and the use of basic imaging equipment. Course fee required. FA, SP.

CJ 2020. Criminal Justice Supervision. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, or law. Covers principles of supervision, including motivation, discipline, evaluation, scheduling, work assignments, stress management and functioning of line and staff, using lectures, videos, guest lecturers, practical problem solving, and text study. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher); AND CJ 1010. SP.

CJ 2330. Juvenile Justice. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, law, criminology, school counseling, or teaching. Examines the origin, philosophy and development of the juvenile justice system, juvenile court, relationship of various segments of the juvenile justice system and also examines theories of juvenile criminality and trends in treatment. Uses lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. Provides a foundation for work with juveniles. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher); AND CJ 1010. SP.

CJ 2350. Laws of Evidence. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, law, or criminology. Deals with the principles and rules of law emphasizing evidentiary problems related to criminal cases. Uses lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. Provides a foundation for work in the criminal justice field or for students intending to attend the law enforcement or corrections academy. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher); AND CJ 1010. FA, SP.

CJ 2360. Juvenile Law & Procedure. 3 Hours.

Covers the causes and treatments of juvenile delinquency, including both conventional and non-conventional theoretical perspectives and solutions to the juvenile crime problem. Specific topics include: the nature of delinquency, theories in delinquency, female delinquency, gang behavior, and institutional care. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher); AND CJ 1010. FA.

CJ 2500. A+ Computer Hardware/Windows OS. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course introducing basic hardware and software using lecture and hands-on, practical application. Successful completion of the course prepares students to pass the A+ certification exam, the standard in foundational, vendor-neutral computer certification. Dual listed with IT 1200 (students may take only one course for credit). Course fee required. FA.

CJ 2700. Introduction to Digital Forensics. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course introducing the digital forensics process, including evidence processing, preservation, analysis, and presentation. Also includes digital evidence basics, data recovery, and some cyber law issues. Requires 6 hours of lab work on a Windows based machine each week. Course fee required. FA, SP.

CJ 2990. Seminar in Criminal Justice. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

CJ 2991. Seminar in Criminal Justice. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

CJ 3100. Profiling Deviant Behavior. 3 Hours.

An historical and theoretical exploration of deviant behavior specifically analyzing particular forms of deviant behavior such as murder and rape, among other crimes. These topics will be discussed using the criminal thinking approach, sociopathic and psychopathic behavior analysis, and life course perspectives. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher, OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher); AND CJ 1010 or PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 3200. Policing in U.S. Society. 3 Hours.

Explores law enforcement at the local, state, and federal levels, introducing the nature of policing, a history of policing in the United States, different types of law enforcement agencies, different roles of police in our society, how police respond to crime, problems in policing, and experiences of police officers. Prerequisites: CJ 1010; AND ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher). SP.

CJ 3250. Private Security. 3 Hours.

Examines external and internal private security measures; confidential personnel investigations and interview procedures. Studies principle and major concepts in prevention, protection, loss control and crime prevention in the commercial sector. Gives students a general overview of the role private security plays in modern society. The course will also introduce students to real-world concepts and applications and includes detailed coverage of everything from industry background and related law to premises, retails, business, employment, and information/computer security as well as surveillance, and even homeland security.

CJ 3270. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Focuses on theories and research of crime causation, using a variety of criminological theories to analyze biological, psychological, and social factors that have been shown to contribute to criminal behavior. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 3300. Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes the practical application of basic research practices to tests of criminological theory as well as law enforcement and corrections problems. Students gain the knowledge necessary to interpret pertinent research in their area of interest. Prerequisites: CJ 1010 AND, ACT score of 28; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher); AND MATH 1040 (Grade C or higher). FA.

CJ 3320. Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

Examines procedural requirements for judicial processing of criminal offenders, including the rights of the accused, general court procedures, trial preparation, and principal constitutional law as applicable to criminal justice practitioners. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). Offered based on sufficient student need.

CJ 3350. American Jails and Prisons. 3 Hours.

Examines the American penal system with particular emphasis on history, management, operations, focusing on the contemporary, adult prison with a particular emphasis upon contemporary problems, issues, and dilemmas. Diversity topics such as integration of the prison work force by women and minorities as well as the problems of elderly, women, and minority inmates will be examined. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA.

CJ 3400. Drugs and Crime. 3 Hours.

Explains the international aspect of the growth, production and distribution of controlled dangerous substances, including the manufacture, cultivation, and distribution of controlled dangerous substances in the United States as well as strategies that have been used to combat the problem. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). SP.

CJ 3500. White Collar Crime. 3 Hours.

Examines white collar crime, specifically exploring the definitions of white collar crime and how it is prosecuted. Describes the theories used to best understand participation in this type of criminal behavior. Addresses the punitive measures implemented in white collar cases and ethical issues surrounding these measures. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). Offered based on sufficient student need.

CJ 3600. The Criminal-Life Course. 3 Hours.

Covers developmental trajectories of criminal behavior, beginning with the question, "what are the origins of delinquency?" Breaks into three sections: 1) The nature vs. nurture debate, 2) Investigates persistence and desistance of criminal behavior from childhood through adolescence (framed by the social psychological factors influencing crime), and 3) Examines criminal careers of people who persist in crime through adulthood. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA.

CJ 3710. Crimes Against Humanity. 3 Hours.

A multi-disciplinary examination of the emergence and impact of modern conceptions of human rights. Examines institutions such as International War Tribunals and Peace and Reconciliation Commissions. Particular attention paid to the theories and causes of genocide. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). SP.

CJ 3810. Advanced Digital Forensics. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course exploring advanced issues in digital forensics. Topics will be determined by student interest, but may include lab assignment involving current issues such as steganography, encrypted file systems, advanced data recovery, and digital triage. Helps prepare students for advanced digital forensics courses through project work and advanced tool introduction. Requires 6 hours of lab work each week. Course fee required. Prerequisite: CJ 2700 (Grade C- or higher). FA.

CJ 3900. Digital Forensics Tools. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course designed to familiarize students with tools available to the digital forensic examiner. Topics include examination of email messages, deleted files, free space, file slack, and password recovery. In addition, students will learn to search for and export graphic files, gain access to encrypted files, and prepare basic forensic examination reports. Commercial tool certification training and opportunities available dependent on time and funds. This course is pared with CJ 3950. Requires 6 hours in the lab each week. Course fee required. Prerequisite: CJ 1900 or CJ 2700 (Grade C- or higher). FA.

CJ 3950. Digital Forensics Tools II. 3 Hours.

Continues the exploration of digital forensics tools from CJ 3900. This course explores more advanced digital forensic tools in use by digital forensics examiners. In addition advanced report writing will be covered to include digital forensics report formats, HTML with digital forensic report writing, and child exploitation reports. Commercial tool certification training and opportunities available dependent on time and funds. Requires 6 hours of lab work each week. Course fee required. Prerequisite: CJ 3900 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

CJ 4020. Urban Crime. 3 Hours.

Focuses on crime in the inner-city, the most crime-riddled areas in our country; examines urban crime typologies and their possible causes. Specifically, this course covers gang violence, the illegitimate economy of the inner-city, the policies designed to help combat the high crime rates of urban areas, and more. Prerequisite: CJ 3270. FA.

CJ 4100. Social Control. 3 Hours.

Closely examines the mechanisms of social control, including formal means through the criminal justice system and informal means through familial and communal institutions. Covers punitive measures used in the criminal justice system, the behavioral influence of social control mechanisms, the ethics of policies of social control, and more. Prerequisite: CJ 3270. FA.

CJ 4200. Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, law, or criminology. Examines criminal justice system, police, courts, corrections, and related government functions and agencies, identifying and exploring ethical problems, issues, and trends. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 and CJ 3300. SP.

CJ 4240. Delinquency & Social Responsibility. 3 Hours.

Considers the statement: all crime is deviant but not all deviance is criminal. Breaks into three sections: 1. Reviews the origins, development, and reactions societies have to violations of codified law, 2. Considers what role a society plays in the creation and management of criminal behavior, and 3. Develops a plan for future laws and social policies designed to address criminal behavior. Prerequisite: CJ 3270. SP.

CJ 4260. The Criminology & Policy of Terrorism. 3 Hours.

Traces the history, causes and manifestations of terrorism, and reflects on the changes the 'War on Terrorism' has brought about for national and human security and for human rights. Also includes assessments of the responses to terrorism by domestic and international organizations, intelligence services and courts and trough diplomacy, criminal investigations, military action, etc. Prerequisites: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled) AND CJ 3300 (can be concurrently enrolled). Offered basd on sufficient student need.

CJ 4500. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of theoretical issues in criminal justice. Students will engage in research and presentations on a topic selected by the instructor. Repeatable as topic varies up to 9 credits. Consult course schedule for rotation. Prerequisite: CJ 3270.

CJ 4700. File System Analysis. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course which provides the analysis for digital media at the file system level, including NTFS, FAT, and less popular file systems. Requires 6 hours of lab work each week. Course fee required. Prerequisites: CJ 2700 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

CJ 4750. Small Device Forensics. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course exploring the digital forensic examination of various small scale digital devices such as personal digital assistants, cell phones, GPS devices, and MP3 players. Focuses on specific search and seizure issues with these devices, how forensic challenges differ from those present with personal computers, and the technical issues commonly encountered during examination. Requires 6 hours of lab work each week. Course fee required. Prerequisite: CJ 2700 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

CJ 4780. Digital Forensics Capstone. 3 Hours.

Capstone course for students seeking the digital forensics emphasis in the bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice with an emphasis in Digital Forensics or the Certificate of Completion in Computer Forensics. Involves a semester-long project overseen by a member of the faculty. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. SP.

CJ 4790. Capstone Research in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Criminal Justice capstone requirement. Requires consolidation of information, skills, and knowledge learned throughout students' undergraduate studies, particularly in the core and research areas, to conduct independent research to further develop their understanding of criminology as a science, contemporary issues and techniques in digital forensics, and/or other criminal justice topics. Prerequisite: CJ 3300, Criminal Justice major, and Senior status. FA, SP.

CJ 4860R. Criminology Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Students work with local or regional agencies or institutions or faculty on professional research. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Offered upon sufficient student need. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

CJ 4875. Criminal Justice Sr Practicum. 1 Hour.

Designed to help seniors graduating in criminal justice become acquainted with career opportunities and to prepare resumes for employment or graduate school. Students will refine interview skills; create and foster social networks with local employers; learn about graduate school resources; and explore post-graduate options. Prerequisites: CJ Major and Senior standing. SP.

CJ 4890R. Criminal Justice Internship. 1-3 Hours.

Internship in Criminal Justice emphasizing service-learning and community involvement. Provides actual work experience on a paid or volunteer basic in a criminal justice profession or related approved work situation. Credit hours are dependent on hours worked and other agreed-upon student outcomes. Repeatable up to 3 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP.

CJ 4900. Current Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of current issues in criminal justice, with all areas of the Criminal Justice system open to investigation. Including, but not limited to policing, legal, and corrections challenges as well as private industry demands on justice systems. Current issues topics selected by the instructor. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

Faculty

Chair of the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Robert Carlson, Ph.D.

Assistant Professors

Gary Cantrell, Ph.D.

Lish Harris, Ph.D.

R.C. Morris, Ph.D.

DSU-CCI Director

Bill Matthews, M.A.

Instructors

Joan Runs Through, M.S.

Michael Tatum, Ed.D.