History & Political Science

226 McDonald Bldg.
(435) 652-7881
http://hps.dixie.edu/

To find faculty & staff phone numbers and email addresses, please consult the University Directory.

Department Chair
Chip McLeod, Ph.D.

Administrative Assistant
Hope Mullins

Dean
Richard Featherstone, Ph.D.

Administrative Specialist
Christine Arlotti

Program Description

The Dixie State University Department of History and Political Science offers a wide variety of courses to develop the following student outcomes: a descriptive knowledge base, scholarly research skills, effective written communication, and critical interpretations of the past and present. Through popular General Education courses like HIST 1700 American Civilization and POLS 1100 American Government, non-majors can fulfill their American Institutions credit required by the state of Utah for graduation. The department provides DSU students with a unique knowledge base and skill set to foster active citizenship and professional opportunities in a variety of fields.

The department is composed of 15 highly-qualified faculty members with a vast array of specialties including: African-American History, American Constitution, American Radicalism, American West, Civil War, Cold War, Early American Republic, Energy Security Strategies, International Law, International Relations, Islam, Latin-American Social Movements, Nazi Germany, Oral History, Popular Culture in East Asia, Transnational History, Utah/Mormon History, and War/Terrorism.

The Dixie State University Department of History and Political Science supervises several baccalaureate degrees. The History Bachelor of Arts degree requires proficiency in a foreign language, which can be fulfilled in a variety of ways. The Bachelor of Science degree requires social sciences coursework beyond the core and electives. Students pursuing teaching careers in secondary education can choose a Bachelor of Arts or Science in Social Sciences Composite Teaching. This unique program prepares students to teach in many areas of the high school curriculum, including: American History, World History, Utah History, Political Science, Psychology, Geography, Economics, and Sociology.

The History Minor option prepares students from a variety of disciplines to contextualize their field of study within the human experience. History Minors are exposed to a variety of perspectives and research methodologies that augment their skills in almost any profession or area of graduate study. Currently we do not offer a Political Science Minor, but plan on developing one in the upcoming future.

Why Study History and Political Science?

The Dixie State University Department of History and Political Science provides students with a critical education which understands movement and change. A critical education understands the contemporary world as a synthesis of the past, and appreciates how the present will project itself into the future. Such an education is the bedrock of active citizenship. If a citizen does not know history it is as if they were born yesterday. The study of History and Political Science is a protective armor against the excessive disinformation of the modern cyberworld and mass media.

In practical terms, the Department of History and Political Science prepares students to pursue advanced study in history, law, international relations, journalism, or numerous other professional fields. Our programs train students to investigate complex problems, identify reliable sources, analyze information, and communicate conclusions in a clear and thoughtful manner through advanced writing skills.

The core of our Department's mission is to assist students in understanding the complexity of the human experience in order to develop their own humanity. The study of the human experience must not end at the classroom door; by studying history, we make individuals of the past human again, and this in turn reconnects us to our own humanity

Course Prefixes:

  • HIST, POLS, SS

.

Career Strategies

Students can enhance learning and career opportunities in a number of ways:

  • Select minor and/or elective coursework in a complementary discipline, such as creative or technical writing, history, or multi-cultural communication
  • Create a portfolio of writing that demonstrates analytical and creative writing skills
  • Engage in opportunities for service-learning or study abroad
  • Develop strong public speaking skills
  • Develop strong grammar and language skills, including a second language
  • Consider graduate school; higher degrees will increase pay and may increase opportunities

Career Opportunities*

Because our programs are centered on learning how to think, especially analysis and synthesis, the opportunities for graduates are limited only by their imaginations and interests. Our graduates frequently work in these fields:

  • Law and politics
  • Local, state, and federal government
  • Secondary and post-secondary education
  • Public history and museum work
  • Publishing
  • Journalism
  • Media, television, and film
  • Social activism
  • Librarian or archivist
  • Media
  • Labor organizing
  • Non-governmental organizations
  • Non-profit organizations

Job Outlook / Salary Range*

Since the opportunities are so varied, the job outlook and salary range will depend on each student’s particular career path. The job outlook is best for those graduates who can analyze multiple perspectives and conflicting sources of information and then communicate their findings.

*

 From the Occupational Outlook handbook

History Courses

HIST 1001. FYE: History. 1 Hour.

First Year Experience seminar course is designed to help freshman students interested in History to adapt to university life and become integrated into Dixie State University and the Humanities department. Students will refine academic skills, create and foster social networks, learn about university resources, explore the different options available within the History program, and learn about career opportunities in History. Multiple listed with all other sections of First Year Experience (all 1001 courses and ENGR 1000). Students may only take one FYE course for credit. FA.

HIST 1100. Western Civilization: From Pre-History to 1715. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement. Explores the intellectual, social, ethical, religious, and aesthetic processes, institutions and ideas of Western Civilization from pre-history to 1715. Emphasizes reading, discussing, and writing about important texts and art forms of various periods. Successful completers will have developed an understanding of the general intellectual trends and historical contexts of western civilization through the Age of Reason. FA.

HIST 1110. Western Civilization: From 1715 to Present. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement. Explores the intellectual, social, ethical, religious, and aesthetic processes, institutions and ideas of Western Civilization from 1715 to the present. Emphasizes reading, discussing, and writing about important texts and art forms of various periods. Successful completers will have developed an understanding of the general intellectual trends and historical contexts of western civilization after the Age of Reason. SP.

HIST 1500. World History to 1500. 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Spans human origins and early civilizations to the emergence of European Empires and the early explorations of the Americas up to 1500 C.E. FA.

HIST 1510. World History Since 1500. 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Themes in the historical development of the world's peoples and cultures since 1500, tracing the decline of Asiatic Empires and the rise of European Empires. Students will study the diversity of global experiences and the emergence of the modern globalized economy. SP.

HIST 1700. American Civilization. 3 Hours.

Fulfills the General Education American Institutions (Utah State Code R470) requirement. Surveys the historical, constitutional, and economic growth of the United States from colonial times to the present. Employs lectures, discussion, audio-visual materials, and various other instructional methods. Successful students will demonstrate a reasonable understanding of the history, principles, form of government, and economic system of the United States, as well as an appreciation of the American heritage and the responsibilities of American citizens. Prerequisite: Reading placement score of 17 or higher; or ENGL 1010, ENGL 1010D, or ENGL 1470. FA, SP, SU.

HIST 2700. U.S. History to 1877. 3 Hours.

If both HIST 2700 and HIST 2710 are successfully completed, fulfills the General Education American Institutions (Utah State Code R470) requirement. If course is not used for American Institutions requirement, it can be used to fulfill the General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement. Chronological survey of the first half of the American experience, beginning with the Paleo-Indian cultures and emphasizing American Independence, development of the Constitution, the emergence of Jacksonian democracy, and the causes of the Civil War, through post-Civil War Reconstruction. Includes social, political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic developments throughout this period. Prerequisite: Reading placement score 17 or higher; or ENGL 1010, ENGL 1010D, or ENGL 1470. FA.

HIST 2710. U.S. History Since 1877. 3 Hours.

If both HIST 2700 and HIST 2710 are successfully completed, fulfills the General Education American Institutions (Utah State Code R470) requirement. If course is not used for American Institutions requirement, it can be used to fulfill the General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement.Chronological survey of the second half of the American experience, beginning with the collapse of post-Civil War Reconstruction and emphasizing the growth of the U.S., emergence as a world power, and domestic reform of the twentieth century, through contemporary issues. Includes the social, political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic developments throughout this period. Prerequisite: Reading placement score 17 or higher; or ENGL 1010, ENGL 1010D, or ENGL 1470. SP.

HIST 3000. Historical Research Methodologies. 3 Hours.

A research intensive survey of the tools and techniques that historians use to study the past. Emphasis will be placed on historical theory, the process of historical inquiry, research methodologies, and the variety of physical and electronic resources available for historical research. Prerequisites: HIST 2700 or HIST 2710, and ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA.

HIST 3010R. Special Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Specialty subjects in which topics/themes will be developed based upon the research specialties of department faculty. Repeatable for 15 credits as long as the topic varies and subject to graduation restrictions. Offered upon sufficient student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3040. Early Modern Britain (1485-1716). 3 Hours.

A study of England, Scotland, and Ireland with the emphasis on the social, cultural, political, religious and economic development from 1485 to 1715. This course will cover the Reformation, the civil war, and a monarchial and parliamentary revolution among other subjects. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA (odd).

HIST 3150. Russian History from 1860-1924. 3 Hours.

Surveys Russian history for the second half of the nineteenth century from the abolition of serfdom through Lenin. Discusses the fall of the Russian Empire, post-1917 Russia, the role of revolutionary ideology, industrialization of agrarian society, the emergence of Soviet institutions and culture. Emphasizes new definitions of gender, national and class identity, and the interaction between the intellectual elite and the working people. Also discusses major imperial expansion, internal diversity, and various 19th century challenges to empire, including parallels to and clashes with other expanding societies such as the United States. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA (even).

HIST 3160. Russian History 1924-Present. 3 Hours.

Highlights the formation, development and collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia's participation in the industrial revolution, two world wars and other critical moments in modern history. Starts with Joseph Stalin's rise to power and finishes with the analysis of the Cold War and the role of the new Russia in the 21st century. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). SP (odd).

HIST 3180. Nineteenth Century Europe. 3 Hours.

Analyzes transformations in political, economic, and social ideologies of Europe from 1815 to 1914, using primary documents on a variety of ideologies. Includes active class participation and discussion, and much writing in areas agreed upon between instructor and student. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA (odd).

HIST 3190. Twentieth Century Europe. 3 Hours.

Surveys major forces, events and experiences that shaped Europe from 1914 to 2000 and defined its place in the contemporary world. Examines industrialization, nationalism, colonial empires, world wars, Cold War polarization, and the European Union. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). SP (even).

HIST 3240. British History (1714-Present). 3 Hours.

Survey of British history from 1714 to the present, with special emphasis given to Britain's cultural, political, economic, and social development during the Industrial Revolution, the Victorian era, and the twentieth century. Also explores the relationship between the bodies of different types of citizens and the British state, the decline of Victorian values and the rise of New Labour, and Britain's relationship with and its place within the European Union. In addition, tracks the rise and fall of the British Empire and Britain's overall foreign and colonial policies, plus her role in the Napoleonic Wars, WWI and WWII. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). SP (even).

HIST 3250. World War II. 3 Hours.

Upper-level elective intended for history majors, social science composite majors, history minors, and interested DSU students. Examines the causes, history, and impact of the Second World War in both a European and a global context; special attention will be paid both to military events and to how the war influenced the cultural, social, political, and economic destinies of the many people who experienced it. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA (odd).

HIST 3460. Comparative Asian History. 3 Hours.

Surveys history of Asian continent, analyzing common patterns in the cultures of South, Southeast, and East Asia. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2017 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3480. East Asia to 1800. 3 Hours.

Explores the intellectual, social, political, cultural, and religious traditions of China, Japan, and Korea from antiquity to 1800. Each "country" will be addressed in a chronological framework. Analyzes the values and institutions underlying the East Asian world order, compares and contrasts the distinctive characteristics of each country, and explores the impact of East Asia's interdependence and early interaction with the West. Will be taught in two year consecutive cycles in the Fall beginning 2017 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3490. East Asia Since 1800. 3 Hours.

Examines the interrelated histories of China, Japan, and Korea, focusing especially on the forces that brought to the formation of modern East Asian nations in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: wars, colonialism, imperialism, Cold War geopolitics, nationalism, and socialism. Aims at understanding the historical origins of problems that continue to impact East Asia today and at placing the national history of China, Japan, and Korea within a wider East Asian regional framework. Will be taught in a two year consecutive cycle beginning Spring 2015 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3550. Culture of East Asia. 3 Hours.

Explores the culture of three East Asian countries: China, Japan and Korea. Students gain sincere view and understanding of these East Asian cultures through readings, hands-on cultural activities, writing, and discussions on major historical and social events. Will be taught every three years in Fall beginning 2016 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3620. History of Colonial Latin America. 3 Hours.

A topical study of Latin American history from the conquests of the Aztec and Inca in the sixteenth century until the wars of independence in the nineteenth century. This course assesses the impact of Spanish colonialism (as well as that of the Portuguese) on Native Americans and outlines the evolving institutional bases of life in colonial Latin America, including: colonial politics, society, economies, and culture as well as patterns of resistance and accommodation. Will be taught in a two year consecutive cycle beginning Fall 2016 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3630. History of Modern Latin America. 3 Hours.

A topical study of Latin American history since the wars of independence in the nineteenth century up to the present. This course assesses the major political, social, and economic changes that took place throughout Latin America during this momentous period of nation-state formation and engagement with the rest of the world. Will be taught in a two year consecutive cycle beginning Spring 2017 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3640. History of Latin American Revolutions. 3 Hours.

Examines the major revolutionary movements in modern Latin America, particularly during the twentieth century. Including, but not limited to, those movements that developed in Mexico, Cuba, Chile, and Nicaragua. Students will analyze the political, economic, social, and cultural elements at work domestically and internationally that compelled people in these countries to rebel against their government and the status quo. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2016 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3660. History of Mexico. 3 Hours.

Surveys the history of Mexico from the earliest human inhabitation to the present by presenting different interpretations of the major themes and developments in Mexican social, economic, political, and cultural history, including: the reign of the Aztec Empire, Spanish conquest and colonialism, the Porfiriato, and the Mexican Revolution. The goal of this course is to foster a deeper understanding of and appreciation for Mexico's past. Will be taught every three years in Fall beginning 2015 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3670. Slavery & the American Republic. 3 Hours.

Explores the creation of slavery in North America from European settlement until 1865, and emphasizes the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the creation of hereditary chattel slavery in America, the government and legal mechanisms that allowed this, slave life and culture, and the efforts to abolish the institution before the Civil War. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2018 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3720. Colonial America (1607-1763). 3 Hours.

An in-depth exploration of the economic, political, social, and military growth and development of British North America from its founding in 1607 until the Revolutionary War experience of the 1770s. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2016 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3730. The American Civil War and Reconstruction (1848-1876). 3 Hours.

Examines America's greatest crisis from the Mexican War (1846-48) through the abandonment of Reconstruction in 1877, exploring the political, social, economic, and military aspects of the nation's march to war, the conflagration that preserved the Union and ended slavery, and the efforts to reconstruct a shattered South. The course also investigates how Americans remember the Civil War and Reconstruction. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2018 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3740. Emergence of Modern America (1876 - 1941). 3 Hours.

A concentrated survey that explores U.S. history from the Gilded Age in the late nineteenth century through the Progressive Era of reform, WWI, the 1920s, the Great Depression and the New Deal, ending with the onset of WWII. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA (even).

HIST 3750. Contemporary America (1941-Present). 3 Hours.

Covers recent United States history, including domestic and foreign policy since World War II. Emphasizes Cold War, Civil Rights, and the political and social developments of contemporary American. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). SP (odd).

HIST 3870. History of Utah. 3 Hours.

Examines the history of Utah from the earliest human inhabitants, through the settlement by European/Americans in the so-called pioneer period, and on to Statehood. The relationship of Utah's Dixie to Utah's history is a subtopic throughout the course. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). SP.

HIST 4310. History of Nationalism. 3 Hours.

Examines development of nationalism. Addresses different theories of nationalism, and then tests these theories with various case studies. Emphasizes research and writing. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4370. History of Social Movements in Modern America. 3 Hours.

Examines the causes, the organizational methods, the goals, the results, and the historical significance of movements that served to expand social, economic, and political rights in twentieth century America. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4400. Introduction to Islam. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the history, politics, and culture of Islam in order to increase the understanding of the contemporary dimension of this world religion. Dual listed with POLS 4400 (students may take only one course for credit). Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). SP (odd).

HIST 4490. Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. 3 Hours.

Examines the events and ideas in Germany and elsewhere that produced the Nazi state, the Second World War, and the Holocaust. Special attention will be given to the political, cultural and economic events that led to the rise of Hitler and to the reasons for racism, bigotry and intolerance, including the controversial issues of Nazi terror, the 'blame' for these years of murder and war, and the link between the WWII and the Holocaust. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4700. African-American History 1619-Present. 3 Hours.

Surveys major aspects of African Americans' experience and includes their West African background, enslavement, emancipation during the Civil War and Reconstruction, segregation and marginalization, civil rights struggles for equality and inclusion, and the achievements and challenges posed in the late twentieth century and the modern era. Will be taught every three years in Fall beginning 2017 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4710. The American Revolution. 3 Hours.

Examines the social, political, economic, and military contours of the American experience from the French and Indian War through George Washington's first presidential administration, with the major focus placed on the origins, process, and effects of the Revolutionary War. Will be taught every three years in Fall beginning 2016 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4720. The New Nation (1789-1848). 3 Hours.

Explores the major social, political, economic, and military contours of the United States from the establishment of the republic's new government under the Constitution through the Mexican-American War, 1846-1848. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2017 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4730. Society and Culture in the United States (1780-1860). 3 Hours.

A topical examination of American cultural and social history between the Revolution and the Civil War, focusing on the growth and development of the nation's market economy, slavery and abolition, changes in family life, evolving understandings of democracy and republicanism, and the rise of popular literature, amusements, and religion. Will be taught every three years in Fall beginning 2015 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4800R. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students in the History Department who wish to pursue a specific focus of special interest not available in the existing course offerings. Students work under close supervision by appropriate faculty in the design and successful completion of the course. Structured by a formal contractual arrangement with the faculty member that is submitted at the beginning of the semester in which that course work is undertaken. Students are expected to meet with the faculty mentor each week and to provide the faculty member with progress reports and assignment development for feedback and grading purposes on an ongoing basis. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Offered by arrangement.

HIST 4890. Senior Capstone. 3 Hours.

Senior history seminar emphasizing historiographical literacy, research, and writing skills in relation to a specific historical topic. Prerequisite: HIST 3000 (Grade C or higher). SP.

Political Science Courses

POLS 1100. American Government. 3 Hours.

Fulfills the General Education American Institutions (Utah State Code R470) requirement. Surveys the founding of the U.S. Government; the U.S. Constitution; and the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches of government. Also covers politics and elections, international relations, and national security. Helps students acquire a greater understanding of the federal system and of federalism. Employs a wide variety of instructional methods including lectures, student reports, discussions, and audio-visual materials. Successful students will demonstrate a reasonable understanding of the history, principles, form of government, and economic system of the United States. Prerequisite: Reading placement score 17 or higher; or ENGL 1010, ENGL 1010D, ENGL 1470. FA, SP, SU.

POLS 2100. Introduction to International Relations. 3 Hours.

Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Examines the military, economic, social, and political interactions between nations, including how realist, liberal, and idealist theories describe and explain the causes of war and peace, the issues concerning trade and globalization, the content and purpose of international law, and the importance of international institutions such as the United Nations and the European Union. Students will read widely and write analytically to gain a deep understanding of these theories and issues. FA.

POLS 2200. Intro to Comparative Politics. 3 Hours.

Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For students interested in politics or planning to major in political science. Examines political activities within individual countries by looking at the politics of a diverse set of nations such as the United States, England, Russia, China, Japan, Mexico, Iran, Nigeria, etc., in order to compare the political institutions and patterns in one country with those in other countries. The focus is on each country's internal politics, with a view to making generalizations about how politics work in a variety of national settings. This will allow students to understand many democratic styles and how democratic politics compares with the politics in authoritarian governments. Students will read widely and write comparatively about various government structures in various countries. SP (odd).

POLS 2300. Intro to Political Theory. 3 Hours.

For students interested politics or planning to major in political science. Examines the ideas about government from Plato to John Rawls, including Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbs, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Hume, Burke, Kant, Mill, and Marx. Covers ideas about the relationship between those who govern and those who are governed; about the nature of the good life and the role of government in achieving it; about ideas of how those who govern are to be chosen; about the necessity of limits, if any, on those who govern; and about the correct balance between freedom for the individual and the authority of the state. Students will read from the works of the great political thinkers and write criticisms and comparisons of those thinkers' ideas. SP (even).

POLS 2900R. Public Policy and Government Internship. 3 Hours.

Internship in Political Science designed to provide students with practical work experience in local, state or national government institutions. Potential opportunities include state legislature or congressional internship programs. Repeatable up to 12 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP, SU.

POLS 2990. Seminar in Political Science. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

POLS 3030. State and Local Government. 3 Hours.

Surveys the politics, structure, and activities of state and local governments, including intergovernmental relations, legal and theoretical concerns, political processes, and administrative issues, with special attention given to the Utah experience. Prerequisite: POLS 1100. Offered based on sufficient student need.

POLS 3100. Global Issues. 3 Hours.

Examines critical international issues such as peace, economic prosperity, regional stability, and citizenship by studying the US government's role in global affairs. This course will explore foreign policy strategies designed to alleviate existing and potential threats to these key international issues. SP (even).

POLS 3200. Introduction to Law and Politics. 3 Hours.

Examines law as a means of social ordering, social and political functions of civil and criminal law, organization and functions of courts and the legal profession. Special emphasis will be given to applying political and moral theory to legal analysis of the Anglo-American legal tradition. FA (odd).

POLS 3320. Introduction to Public Policy and Analysis. 3 Hours.

Examines theoretical approaches to the study of public policy with special focus on elements such as, agenda setting, policy formulation and implementation and oversight. This course also discusses aspects such as, federalism, crime, lobbying, civil rights, foreign policy, and national security. This course will aid students in gaining a comprehensive understanding of the policy making process, as well as, the effect of policy upon Americans, their government and the world. Students will be instructed through a variety of methods such as, lectures, student debate papers, discussions, and audio-visual means. Successful students will demonstrate a reasonable understanding of the various aspects involved in the formulation and augmentation of policy. FA (odd).

POLS 3400. Global Law. 3 Hours.

Studies the historical evolution of the traditions in comparative perspective with emphasis on France and Germany in the civil law and on the United States and the United Kingdom in the common law. Develops the skills needed for comparative analyses and evaluation of global societies and regions by understanding the foundations of the legal systems on which they stand. SP.

POLS 3500. War and Terrorism. 3 Hours.

Develops logical analyses and critical thinking in the context of War and Terrorism. Applies doctrines of conflicts within our past, to the contemporary conflicts and those within our future. Explores the real cost and effectiveness of war, its true value and impact on the global society, and its real meaning. FA.

POLS 3900. Public Policy and Government Internship Preparation and Research. 3 Hours.

Internship preparation and research course designed to provide political science interns with the skills necessary for success in state legislative internships. Topics covered will include: Utah's legislative process, Utah's executive branch structure, legislative research skills, constituent communication and services, constituent survey analysis, legislative scheduling, Microsoft Outlook, and Microsoft Excel. Week long course taught during the second week of Spring Semester. At the conclusion of the internship, students will submit a research paper based on their experience. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Corequisite: POLS 2900R. SP.

POLS 3960. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Specialty subjects in which topics/themes will be developed based upon the research specialties of department faculty. Repeatable for nine credits subject to graduation restrictions. Offered upon sufficient student demand.

POLS 4400. Introduction to Islam. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the history, politics, and culture of Islam in order to increase the understanding of the contemporary dimension of this world religion. Dual listed with POLS 4400 (students may take only one course for credit). SP.

Social Sciences Courses

SS 4700. Social Studies Curr Methods. 3 Hours.

An intensive course focusing on the methodology of teaching secondary education, including skill, concept and value development in middle, junior high and senior high school social studies teaching. Required for certification in the Social Sciences Composite teaching program. Taught upon sufficient student need.

Faculty

Department Chair

Chip McLeod, Ph.D.
Department Chair

Professors

Chip McLeod, Ph.D.
Early American Republic and Civil War

Associate Professor

Joe Green, M.S.
International Relations and Political Theory

Assistant Professors

Frank Klackle, Ph.D.
Latin American/World History

Hosok O, Ph.D.
Asian/World History

Jeremy Young, Ph.D.
Modern U.S./Cultural History

Instructors

Ace Pilkington, D. Phil.
British and Russian History

Yukie Saito, Ph.D.
Asian History and Gender

Leo Lyman, Ph.D.
Utah History

Lyttle Preston Hughes, Ph.D.
International Relations and Islam

Jason Blazevic, Ph.D.
American Government and China

Shadman Bashir, LL.M.
International Law and Terrorism

Reuben Wadsworth, M.A.
U.S. History

Ron Rife, M.A.
U.S. History

Kimball Forbes, Juris Doctor
American Government

L. Dean Marriott, Ed.D.
U.S. History

Lecturer Advisor/Instructor

Amy Millet, M.A.
U.S. History