Humanities Department

University Plaza
(435) 652-7822
http://dixie.edu/humanities/

To find faculty & staff phone numbers and email addresses, please consult the University Directory.

Department Chair 
Clinton Buhler, Ph.D.

Administrative Assistant
Francine Larger

Dean 
Richard Featherstone, Ph.D.

Administrative Specialist
Christine Arlotti

Program Description

The Humanities department offers a variety of courses in English as a Second Language, Foreign Languages (American Sign Language, Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish), Humanities and Philosophy.

Our mission is to provide students with a set of courses that will enable them to develop a broader perspective and a deeper understanding of their community and the world, as well as examine their assumptions, biases, and preconceptions about the world and its inhabitants. Our aim is to help students develop both as individuals and as active citizens by learning how to contextualize, think critically, and communicate effectively.

Course Prefixes

  • ASL, CHIN, FREN, GERM, HUM, JAPN, PHIL, SPAN

American Sign Language (ASL)

Dixie State University has recently added an American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreting Emphasis to its existing Integrated Studies Program. Students will choose an American Sign Language Interpreting Emphasis along with one other Emphasis.  Completion of the American Sign Language Interpreting Emphasis will provide students the necessary skills to attempt the Utah Novice Interpreter Exam and completion of the baccalaureate degree in Integrated Studies will satisfy the educational requirements for students to attempt the National Interpreter Certification.

A qualified interpreter is one who can both receptively and expressively, interpret accurately, effectively and impartially, using any necessary specialized vocabulary (http://nad.org/issues/american-sign-language/interpreting-american-sign-language). The demand for certified interpreters continues to grow throughout educational, medical, legal and social settings. 

Students with previous background in ASL can receive vertical credits as per policy stated below, and for most degrees can fill the BA foreign language requirement.  For more information, contact Dr. Allyson Hamilton at hamilton@dixie.edu.

Chinese

Beginning, intermediate and advanced classes are offered in Chinese.  Students who desire to fill the Bachelor of Arts language requirement can do so in Chinese.

French

Beginning and intermediate classes are offered in French.  Students who desire to fill the Bachelor of Arts language requirement can do so in French.

German

Beginning and intermediate classes are offered in German.  Students who desire to fill the Bachelor of Arts language requirement can do so in German.

Japanese

Beginning, intermediate and advanced classes are offered in Japanese.  Students who desire to fill the Bachelor of Arts language requirement can do so in Japanese.

Spanish

Spanish is the second most widely spoken language in the United States, and students studying Spanish at DSU can pursue a bachelor’s degree with a major in Spanish, a minor, a Spanish emphasis in Integrated Studies, or a secondary education teaching track.  A Spanish background provides students with a greatly enriched view of the world around them as well as Spanish language skills that will prove useful in many professional occupations.

Students also have the option of taking upper- division courses as electives or for personal interest in grammar and composition, literature, business Spanish, medical Spanish, conversation, and culture. Students could consider Spanish as a minor combined with a major in another discipline as a way to enhance their employability.  In the three years Dixie State has offered a Spanish degree, several graduates are currently continuing their education in medical or dental school, others in other graduate schools, and many are beginning teaching careers.  These students are finding that a background in Spanish expands their opportunities.

Spanish Study Abroad

The Spanish program offers two study abroad options on a rotating basis, one in Oviedo, Spain, and the other in Latin America.

For details contact:       Dr. Lucia Taylor (Spain) lucia.taylor@dixie.edu or Dr. Luis Arévalo (Latin America) arevalo@dixie.edu

Spanish Conversation Table

Once a week throughout the school year, Dr. Luis Arévalo conducts a Spanish conversation table.  All students are welcome to come and enjoy an opportunity to listen and share while they develop their skills in a non-stressful environment.

Spanish Campus Cultural Events

The Spanish program sponsors cultural events to celebrate important days relating to Spanish and Hispanic traditions and customs.  Everyone is welcome to come and participate.

Placement in Foreign Language Courses and Vertical Credits

Students who have extensive experience in a foreign language may receive credits for their knowledge in two ways: by receiving vertical credits or by testing. A student who has lived in a Spanish speaking environment for 1.5 - 2 years, for example, might be able to skip the 1000 and 2000-level classes and enroll directly in a specific upper-division course such as ASL 3010, SPAN 3010 (for heritage Spanish speakers) or SPAN, JAPN, or CHIN 3060, .  By passing the higher level class with a C grade or higher, the student can pay a fee and receive “vertical” credits for the classes that were skipped.  See Foreign Language Placement section below for exclusions.

Students who have previously studied or learned a second language may receive credits for their knowledge in two ways: by receiving vertical credits or by testing. A student who studies multiple years of a language in high school, for example, might be able to skip the 1010 course and begin with a 1020 level class, or s/he may skip to 2010 or 2020, depending on his/her background, and by passing the higher level class with a C grade can pay a fee and receive “vertical” credits for the class or classes skipped.

Students with background in a language can begin with any of the following courses and receive vertical credits for the 1010, 1020, 2010, or 2020 classes below them by passing the class with a C grade or higher, and after paying the appropriate posting fee.

ASL                  1020, 2010, 2020, and 3010.

Chinese             1020, 2010, 2020, 3060, and 3390

French              1020, 2010, and 2020

German             1020, 2010, and 2020

Japanese           1020, 2010, 2020, 3060, and 3070

Spanish             1020, 2010, 2020, 3010, and 3060

Credits by Testing

Students can also take the BYU Foreign Language Test (FLATS) and receive up to 12 credits. Students should be aware that if they are seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree, they will need additional course(s) to fill the requirement of 16 credits.

Foreign Language Placement

  • Students may not enroll in a language beginning or intermediate course if that language was the primary language of instruction for the student at the high school level without permission of the Department Chair.
  • Placement in all foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Students whose abilities and experience in a language are above the course level may be placed in a higher level class and may earn “vertical credit” for lower-level courses.  However, students who graduated from high schools where Spanish, German, etc. was the primary language of education are not eligible for vertical credits in that language.
Bachelor of Arts: Foreign Language Requirement3-16
Complete one of the following:
- Complete 16 credits in a single foreign language, through earned credit (grade C or higher), credit by examination, or vertical credit from the courses listed on the GE Foreign Language Requirement page 1
- Complete a 2020 or higher foreign language course (grade C or higher)
- Complete a 3060 foreign language course listed below (grade C or higher)
- Receive 16 transfer credits for GEFL 1000 (8) and GEFL 2000 (8) in a single foreign language (grade C or higher)
OR
Complete a 1020 course listed below in a second foreign language (grade C or higher) AND one of the following:
1. In a language not taught at DSU, receive 12 FLATS exam credits for FLAT 1000 (8) and FLAT 2000 (4)
or
2. In a language not taught at DSU, receive 12 transfer credits articulated as GEFL 1000 (8) and GEFL 2000 (4) (all grade C or higher)
OR
Available only to students who are nonnative English speakers, complete one of the following:
- Complete 16 credits of ESL courses listed below (grade B or higher)
- Complete ESL 2750 or ESL 2760 (grade B or higher).
- Submit one of the following test scores required for unconditional DSU admission: TOEFL (61 iBT, 173 CBT, or 500 PBT); or Michigan (70); or USU-IELE equivalent score. Other tests may be accepted for admission to DSU but will not fulfill this requirement. Official scores must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office.
Total Hours3-16
1

General Education Foreign Language Classes may be found on the General Education page.

Associate of Arts: Foreign Language Requirement3-8
Complete one of the following:
- Complete 8 credits numbered 1000 or above in a single foreign language, through earned credit (grade C or higher), credit by examination, or vertical credit from the courses listed on the GE Foreign Language Requirement page 1
- Complete a 1020 or higher foreign language course listed below (grade C or higher)
- Receive 8 FLATS exam credits for FLAT 1000
- Receive 8 transfer credits GEFL 1000 (grade C or higher) in a language not currently taught at DSU
Available only to students who are nonnative English speakers, complete one of the following:
- Complete 8 credits of ESL courses listed below (grade B or higher)
- Submit one of the following test scores required for unconditional DSU admission: TOEFL (61 iBT, 173 CBT, or 500 PBT); or Michigan (70); or USU-IELE equivalent score. Other tests may be accepted for admission to DSU but will not fulfill this requirement. Official scores must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office.
1

 General Education Foreign Language Classes may be found on the General Education page.

Definitions

Vertical Credit: Once a student completes a 1020, 2010, 2020, 3010, or 3060 foreign language class with a grade of C or higher, s/he may request credit for language classes in the same language below that level. The class used for vertical is determined by the department.  Posting fee required.

FLATS: Based on score of BYU Foreign Language Assessment Test (available on-line). Maximum 12 credits, cannot duplicate already earned credit, posting fee required,

Nonnative Speaker: For the purposes of earning credit in DSU foreign language classes and/or fulfilling any DSU foreign language requirement, a native speaker’s primary language of instruction at the high school level (as determined by the chair of the Humanities Department) is his/her native language.

Vertical Credit

Once a student completes a DSU 1020, 2010, 2020, 3010, or 3060 foreign language class, as determined by the department, with a grade of C or higher, s/he may request credit for language classes in the same language below that level. Posting fee required.

  • Receiving a grade of C or higher in a foreign language 1020 course enables a student to request “vertical credit” for the 1010 course in the same language (4 additional credits graded “P”).
  • Receiving a grade of C or higher in a foreign language 2010 course enables a student to request “vertical credit” for the 1010 and 1020 courses in the same language (8 additional credits graded “P”)
  • Receiving a grade of C or higher in a foreign language 2020 course enables a student to request “vertical credit” for the 1010, 1020, and 2010 courses in the same language (12 additional credits graded “P”).
  • Receiving a grade of B or higher in ESL 2700 enables a student to request “vertical credit” for ESL 1500 (4 additional credits graded “P”).
  • Receiving a grade of B or higher in ESL 2750 enables a student to request “vertical credit” for ESL 1550 (4 additional credits graded “P”).
  • Receiving a grade of B or higher in ESL 2760 enables a student to request “vertical credit” for ESL 1560 (4 additional credits graded “P”).
  • Receiving a grade of C or higher in a foreign language 3060 course enables a student to request “vertical credit” for the 1010, 1020, 2010, and 2020 courses in the same language (16 additional credits graded “P”) unless the 3060 course is the same language as the primary language of secondary instruction.

Procedure for Vertical Credit

  1. The instructor who taught the advanced class sends a copy of the class grade roll with an indication of all students who qualified for vertical credits to the department chair.
  2. The department chair submits to the Registrar’s Office the grade roll.
  3. The student verifies with the Registrar’s Office a desire to purchase the credits, pays the posting fee, and submits the receipt to the Registrar’s Office.
  4. After the above steps are completed foreign language credit \ graded “P” will be awarded for the preparatory foreign language course(s).

Some programs may have a restriction on which languages can be used to fulfill the Bachelor of Arts foreign language requirement. Check the Degree Worksheet for specific programs to verify which languages are accepted. In 2013-2014, programs in the Fine Arts Division (Art, Music, and Theatre) do not accept ASL.

Clubs

Dixie State University Spanish Club: This club is designed to help those students who are Majoring or Minoring in Spanish at Dixie State University to develop strong, long lasting relationships within the Spanish program as well as to continue to attain knowledge of the language and refine skills already acquired.

Spanish Program Learning Outcomes

PLO1 - Students will be able to communicate at the Advanced Low level in accordance with the ACTFL guidelines for Speaking.
https://www.actfl.org/publications/guidelines-and-manuals/actfl-proficiency-guidelines-2012/english/speaking

PLO2 - Writing proficiency: Students will be able to express themselves at the Advanced Mid level in accordance with the ACTL guidelines for Writing. 
https://www.actfl.org/publications/guidelines-and-manuals/actfl-proficiency-guidelines-2012/english/writing

PLO 3 - Literature Analysis: Students will be able to analyze literary works in Spanish.

PLO 4 - Cultural Awareness: Students will be able to gain knowledge and understanding of other cultures in accordance with the Standards for Foreign Language Learning.
https://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/publications/standards/1996%20National%20Standards%20for%20FL%20L%20Exec%20Summary.pdf

Career Strategies

Students majoring in Spanish can enhance learning and career opportunities in the following ways:

  • Use elective courses to enhance skills in areas such as writing, business, communication, etc.
  • Engage in service learning and volunteer opportunities
  • Enroll in a study abroad and/or travel study program
  • Consider graduate school; higher degrees will increase pay and may increase opportunities
  • In the three years since DSU has had a Spanish degree, multiple graduates in Spanish are now in either dental or medical school, others are in graduate school, and others have begun teaching careers.  Combining Spanish with science, criminal justice, or business, for example can open doors to successful future careers.

Career Opportunities*

Students who earn a bachelor’s degree in Spanish might pursue any of the following careers:

  • Translator / interpreter
  • Foreign service officer
  • Customer service
  • Business
  • travel industry
  • Journalism / broadcast media

Job Outlook*

Employment of interpreters and translators is expected to grow at an impressive rate from 2014 to 2024: 29%, which is much higher than the average for all other occupations. According to the Occupational Outlook handbook in 2015, the growth is due to a need for more skilled interpreters and translators to serve the ever more diverse U.S. population. Job opportunities in Spanish are predicted to be the most in demand.

Salary Range*

The top 10 percent of interpreters and translators earn more than $78,520, and the bottom 10 percent earn less than $23,160. The median pay for interpreters and translators is $44,190. 

*    From the Occupational Outlook Handbook

Further information can be obtained by going to the following website:

Johnson: What is a foreign language worth?    http://www.economist.com/blogs/prospero/2014/03/language-study

American Sign Language Courses

ASL 1010. Beginning American Sign Language I. 4 Hours.

For beginning students interested in American Sign Language. Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Emphasizes principles, methods, and techniques of communicating manually with deaf individuals. Teaches basic receptive and expressive skills, overviews basic grammatical structure in signing, and explores deaf culture. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including drills, videos, and work in pairs. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts degree or Bachelor of Arts degree for some majors. Successful completers are prepared to take ASL 1020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. FA.

ASL 1020. Beginning American Sign Language II. 4 Hours.

For students interested in American Sign Language who have completed ASL 1010 or who have equivalent experience (approximately two years of high school ASL). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Emphasizes principles, methods, and techniques of communicating manually with deaf individuals. Continues the development of basic conversational skills with emphasis on the receptive skills, grammatical features, vocabulary development, and cultural awareness. Varied methods are used to teach the class, including drills, videos, and work in pairs. Students using 1020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for ASL 1010 upon passing 1020 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts degree or Bachelor of Arts degree for some majors. Successful completers are prepared to take ASL 2010. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: ASL 1010 or instructor permission. SP.

ASL 1500. Introduction to Deaf Culture. 3 Hours.

For students interested in understanding Deaf culture. Focuses on the historical events that impact members of the Deaf Community. Explores American Sign Language and its unique place in Deaf culture. Also addresses the diversity and cultural identity of members of the Deaf community in America. Includes lecture, community experiences and basic comparison between Deaf culture and the student's own culture. Course is taught in or interpreted into spoken English. FA.

ASL 2010. Intermediate American Sign Language I. 4 Hours.

For intermediate-level students who have taken ASL 1020, or for students with equivalent experience (four or more years of high school ASL). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Continued emphasis on communicative competence, including both expressive and receptive abilities, as well as cultural awareness. Students using 2010 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2010 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts degree or Bachelor of Arts degree for some majors. Successful completers are prepared to take ASL 2020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: ASL 1020 or instructor permission. FA.

ASL 2020. Intermediate American Sign Language II. 4 Hours.

For intermediate-level students who have taken ASL 2010. Continued emphasis on communicative competence, including both expressive and receptive abilities, as well cultural awareness. Students using 2020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2020 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts degree or Bachelor of Arts degree for some majors. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: ASL 2010 or instructor permission. SP.

ASL 2300. Introduction to Interpreting. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the process of interpreting spoken English to American Sign Language and American Sign Language to spoken English. Course allows students to become familiar with the profession of interpreting including; legislation, history, ethics, terminology, and the variety of professional workplaces and the certification process. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including lecture, videos, guest lecturers, practice interpreting sessions and recording videos for self-evaluation of signing skills. This course is a prerequisite for advanced interpreting courses required for an American Sign Language Interpreting Emphasis. SP.

ASL 3010. Advanced American Sign Language I. 4 Hours.

Builds on skills learned in Beginning and Intermediate American Sign Language. Students will practice conversational skills and increase their understanding of the grammar of ASL including the use of space, facial grammar, semantics and syntactical structure. This course is taught in ASL and is designed for students who have demonstrated competency through former coursework, missionary service, or students who are native-users (CODAs). Students using ASL 3010 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level courses upon passing ASL 3010 with a grade of C or higher. Placement in Advanced American Sign Language classes require a screening for competency and skills. Placement is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: ASL 2020 (Grade C or higher). FA.

ASL 3020. Advanced American Sign Language II. 4 Hours.

Builds on skills learned in Advanced American Sign Language (ASL). Students will build their skills in conversational, grammatical and syntactical aspects of ASL. This course requires students to be actively involved in events of the Deaf community. This course is taught in ASL. Placement in Advanced American Sign Language classes requires a screening for competency and skills. Placement is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: ASL 3010 (Grade C or higher). SP.

ASL 3300. Current Trends in Interpreting. 3 Hours.

This course increases the focus on the process of interpreting spoken English to American Sign Language and American Sign Language to spoken English. Instruction focuses on the various types of interpreting including education, mental health, medical, legal, video relay and remote video interpreting. Students will explore the history of the interpreting profession and discover the processes and requirements of becoming a certified interpreter. Students will discover ways that they can provide cultural mediation in an interpreting situation. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including lecture, videos, guest lecturers, practice interpreting sessions and recording videos for self-evaluation of signing skills. Prerequisite: ASL 2300. SP.

ASL 3400. American Sign Language Linguistics. 3 Hours.

This course provides the foundation for concepts presented in ASL 3010 and ASL 3020. Course focuses on linguistic and grammatical structures of ASL including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the complexities of ASL and evaluate and improve their linguistic and grammatical skills. Prerequisite: ASL 2020. FA.

ASL 4300. Transliterating. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the challenges of transliterating between spoken English and manually coded English sign systems. Students will be able to recognize varieties of manually coded English sign systems and internalize strategies to match consumer language use and meaning. Students will learn the developmental theories behind manually coded sign systems. This course will prepare students to apply specific components on state quality assurance exams for American Sign Language Interpreters. Prerequisites: ASL 2020 and ASL 2300. FA.

ASL 4350. Advanced Interpreting. 3 Hours.

This course applies the knowledge gained in previous courses to the process of interpreting spoken English to American Sign Language and American Sign Language to spoken English. Instruction focuses on the profession and skills required to be an interpreter in a variety of settings. Students will participate in various interpreting scenarios. Participants will be expected to record their interpreting scenarios and participate in critiques of their own and other ASL interpreter's skills. Students will identify patterns of errors and apply techniques for repairing the interpreted messages. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including lecture, videos, guest lecturers, practice interpreting sessions and recording videos for self-evaluation of signing skills. Prerequisite: ASL 2300. SP.

ASL 4500. Advanced Deaf Culture. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on specific historical events that have contributed to the formation of the Deaf community. Students will explore how members of the Deaf community identify with their ethnic, cultural and linguistic characteristics. Students will explain how audism and oppression have impacted members of the Deaf community and how legislation and regulations have contributed both positively and negatively to events in the Deaf community. This course includes lecture, community experiences and basic comparison between Deaf culture and the student's own culture. This course is taught in American Sign Language. Prerequisite: ASL 1500. SP.

ASL 4700. Ethics of Interpreting. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the ethical aspects of medical, educational, legal, mental health, Video Relay, Video Remote and other interpreting situations. Students will understand the tenets of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Code of Professional Conduct. Students will study a variety of interpreting situations and discuss the specific ethical issues involved in the given scenarios. Students will use the Demand/Control Schema to consider all of the ethical choices that can be made in routine interpreting scenarios. Prerequisite: ASL 3300. FA.

Chinese Courses

CHIN 1010. Beginning Mandarin Chinese I. 4 Hours.

For beginning students interested in the Chinese language. Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Emphasis on gaining communicative competence by focusing on the development of speaking and listening comprehension skills. Discussion of Chinese culture is also a component of the course. Several teaching methods are used, including lecture, drill practice, conversation exchanges and group work. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take Chinese 1020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. FA.

CHIN 1020. Beginning Mandarin Chinese II. 4 Hours.

For students who have completed CHIN 1010 or who have equivalent experience (approximately two years of high school Chinese). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Continued emphasis on gaining communicative competence by focusing on the development of speaking and listening comprehension skills. Several teaching methods are employed, including lecture, drill practice, conversation exchanges, videos, lab tapes, and group work. Students using 1020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for CHIN 1010 upon passing 1020 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take CHIN 2010. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: CHIN 1010 or instructor permission. SP.

CHIN 2010. Intermediate Mandarin Chinese I. 4 Hours.

For students who have studied Mandarin Chinese for two semesters to continue to learn the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) to improve linguistic competence in real world situations. Linguistic proficiency is acquired through a variety of class activities. Although pinyin will be continuously used as a tool to facilitate the speaking and writing skills, a certain accumulation of knowledge of Chinese reading and writing (characters) is a prerequisite. Students using 2010 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2010 with a C or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: CHIN 1020 or instructor permission. FA (even).

CHIN 2020. Intermediate Mandarin Chinese II. 4 Hours.

For students who have studied Mandarin Chinese for three semesters to continue to learn the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) to improve linguistic competence in real world situations. Linguistic proficiency is acquired through a variety of class activities. Although pinyin will be continuously used as a tool to facilitate the speaking and writing skills, a certain accumulation of knowledge of Chinese reading and writing (characters) is a prerequisite. Students using 2020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2020 with a C or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: CHIN 1020 or instructor permission. SP (odd).

CHIN 3060. Introduction to Written Chinese. 3 Hours.

First course for students who have learned to speak but not write the language in a Chinese-speaking environment. Intensive study of writing system, grammar, and various writing styles. Students begin learning to comprehend simple written and spoken "Shumianyu" Chinese through authentic newspaper articles and video materials. Additional exposure to cultures and customs. Students who take this class will have had exposure to Mandarin Chinese through previous coursework or extended residency, such as missionary service, military service, etc. FA.

CHIN 3990. Seminar in Chinese. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

English as a Second Language Courses

ESL 0100. Intro to Academic Comm. 3 Hours.

Designed to help students prepare for communication in academic settings. This course will introduce listening, speaking, and note-taking strategies and skills in academia. Students will (1) listen to college lectures in authentic lecture settings, and (2) learn vocabulary which students are most likely to encounter in academia, working with the instructor, in small groups, or with technology to practice the skills presented in this course. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Listening score 0-8.

ESL 0111. English Conversation 1. 3 Hours.

Designed to give students a foundation in listening comprehension and conversation. The course will help student learn simple statements, questions, and commands of familiar topics and progress to understanding simple conversational English. In addition, the course will offer all-skills language practice in listening, speaking, reading, writing and pronunciation. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Listening score 0-8.

ESL 0140. Intro to Reading in English. 3 Hours.

Designed to help students who have extremely limited English proficiency gain the foundations related to developing reading skills in English. The course will introduce fundamental vocabulary, word attack skills, dictionary skills, and comprehension skills. Students will be introduced to: (1) both academic and non-academic materials, and (2) strategies for approaching different types of reading. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Reading score 0-11. Offered based on sufficient student need.

ESL 0150. Intro to Academic Writing. 3 Hours.

Designed for students who have very limited English proficiency as indicated by TOEFL iBT writing scores of 8 or lower. Introduces the foundations of concepts related to developing writing skills in academic settings, including the skills necessary to develop coherency and fluency in writing by focusing on sentences, responses to readings, vocabulary development, and minimal technical accuracy. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Grammar score 0-6.

ESL 0160. Intro to English Grammar. 3 Hours.

Designed for students who have limited English proficiency skills. It will introduce the foundations of concepts related to developing skills in English usage, correct speech, writing forms and patterns, basic verb tenses and their related structures, and simple use of parts of speech. This course will focus on Standard American English usage and conventions. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Grammar score 0-6. Offered based upon sufficient student need.

ESL 0165. Intro/Integ English Skills Lab. 1 Hour.

Designed to help students improve their English skills using up-to-date technology. Focuses strongly on speaking, pronunciation, listening, and developing fluency, as well as grammatical accuracy and reading comprehension. Offered based on sufficient student need. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT combined score 0-26.

ESL 0200. Basic Academic Communication. 3 Hours.

Focuses on a basic foundation in listening comprehension skills in academic settings. By helping students develop a wide range of listening, speaking, and note-taking strategies and skills while listening to college lectures. In addition, the course will introduce students to vocabulary which they are most likely to encounter in academic contexts. Students will work with the instructor, in small groups, or with technology to practice the skills presented in this course. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Listening score 9-12, or ESL 0100 (Grade B or higher). Offered based on sufficient student need.

ESL 0211. Academic Speaking 2. 3 Hours.

Designed to give students a basic foundation in listening comprehension and conversation in academic contexts. The course will offer guided discussions on academic topics, which engage students in meaningful conversations with carefully chosen vocabulary and grammar. In addition, the course will offer all-skills language practice in listening, speaking, reading, writing and pronunciation while focusing on sample conversations, lectures, and presentations. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Listening score 9-12, or ESL 0111 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 0300. Basic Reading in English. 3 Hours.

Designed to give students the opportunity to develop reading skills in English. Students will study beginning vocabulary, as well as word attack, dictionary, and comprehension skills. Students will read academic and non-academic works and develop strategies for approaching different types of reading. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Reading score 12-17, or ESL 0140 (Grade B or higher). Offered based on sufficient student need.

ESL 0330. Introduction to American Culture and Society. 2 Hours.

This course introduces English as a Second Language students to American culture and society (with an emphasis on Utah and the Western United States) and develops basic language skills needed to interact with the community. Students will become familiar with American customs and cultural life in areas such as family life, holidays, beliefs, sports, entertainment, and the education system. Students will be encouraged to compare American culture with their home culture and come to a deeper understanding of both. The course will include activities which have students interact with the community through special projects and field trips. Prerequisites: Combined CaMLA score of 27 or higher; B or higher grade in any of the following courses: ESL111, ESL140, ESL150, ESL160.

ESL 0350. Basic Academic Writing. 3 Hours.

Designed to help students gain basic writing skills in academic contexts. It will help students develop coherency and fluency in writing by focusing on short writing assignments, responses to readings, vocabulary development, style and development, and technical accuracy. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Grammar score 7-10, or ESL 0150 (Grade B or higher). Offered based on sufficient student need.

ESL 0360. Basic English Grammar. 3 Hours.

Designed to help ESL students develop basic skills in English usage, correct speech and writing forms and patterns, basic verb tenses and their related structures, and simple use of parts of speech. The course will focus on Standard American English usage and conventions. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Grammar score 7-10, or ESL 0160 (Grade B or higher). Offered based on sufficient student need.

ESL 0365R. Basic Integrated English Skills Lab. 1 Hour.

Designed to help students improve their English skills using up-to-date technology. Focuses strongly on speaking, pronunciation, listening, and developing fluency, as well as grammatical accuracy and reading comprehension. Offered based on sufficient student need. Lab fee required. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credits. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT combined score 27-40, or ESL 0165 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 0565. Interm Integ Eng Skills Lab. 1 Hour.

Designed to help students improve their English skills using up-to-date technology. Focuses strongly on speaking, pronunciation, listening, and developing fluency, as well as grammatical accuracy and reading comprehension. Offered based on sufficient student need. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT combined score 41-61, or ESL 0365 (Grade B or higher). FA, SP.

ESL 0765R. Adv Integ English Skills Lab. 1 Hour.

Designed to help students improve their English skills using up-to-date technology. Focuses strongly on speaking, pronunciation, listening, and developing fluency, as well as grammatical accuracy and reading comprehension. Offered based on sufficient student need. Lab fee required. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credits. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT combined score of 62-69, or ESL 0565 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 1000. International Student Academic Success. 1 Hour.

For international students. This course provides international students with the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and awareness needed to adapt to college life at Dixie State University. Topics include: US immigration compliance, cross-cultural adjustment, campus services, academic advisement, safety and emergency issues, academic success, and academic integrity. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP.

ESL 1001. FYE: International Students. 1 Hour.

Strongly recommended for International students in their first semester at DSU. The course is designed to help students adapt to college life and become integrated into Dixie State University. Students will refine academic skills, create and foster social networks, learn about college resources, and explore different fields of study, degree options, and career opportunities. Open major sections will include information about choosing a major or area of study. Multiple listed with all other sections of First Year Experience (all 1001 courses, ENGR 1000). Students may only take one FYE course for credit. FA, SP, SU.

ESL 1500. Interm Reading in English. 4 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Foreign Language requirement. Focuses on the continued development of reading skills within academic content areas. Students use a variety of methods and materials to learn intermediate reading strategies and to improve comprehension, expand students' vocabularies, improve dictionary skills, and increase skills in reading for information. The course will focus on the skills students need to be successful in college-level reading intensive courses as well as the skills needed to read for entertainment and general information. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Reading score 18-27, or ESL 0300 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 1550. Interm Academic Writing. 4 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Foreign Language requirement. Designed to help students gain intermediate writing skills in academic contexts, this course will focus on writing well-developed short paragraphs with sentence variety, fluency, intermediate vocabulary, and standard conventions of English. Students will be exposed to the writing process and will be expected to produce pre-writing activities, drafts, revisions, in addition to final drafts of academic writing. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Grammar score 11-15, or ESL 0350 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 1560. Intermediate English Grammar. 4 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Foreign Language requirement. Designed to help ESL students develop basic skills in English usage, correct speech and writing forms and patterns, basic verb tenses and their related structures, and simple use of parts of speech. The course will focus on Standard American English usage and conventions. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Grammar score 11-15, or ESL 0360 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 1570. Interm Acad Communication. 4 Hours.

Designed to prepare students for the challenges of college lectures with a wide range of listening, speaking, and note-taking strategies and skills. The course will introduce the college lectures drawn from a range of academic disciplines. In addition, the course will ensure that students learn the vocabulary used frequently in academic settings. Students will work with the instructor, in small groups, or with technology to practice the skills presented in this course. The course will also develop classroom presentation skills. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Listening score 13-18, or ESL 0200 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 1580. Academic Speaking 3. 4 Hours.

Designed to help students build general English language proficiency and apply these skills for success in daily life, the community, and work. In addition, the course will offer students guided conversations within carefully structured grammatical frameworks and give students opportunities to practice language skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing and pronunciation. The course will also develop classroom presentation skills. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Listening score 13-18, or ESL 0211 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 1800. Experience in International English Studies. 4 Hours.

This is a special course for international students (from non-US universities) who want a brief experience of learning English in the United States, but cannot stay for an entire semester. It will include a four-week exposure to five DSU ESL classes for a total of 4 credits. Must register for this class and attend and complete all work required within the four weeks in the following courses: ESL 0411, 0565, 1500, 1550 and 1560. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP.

ESL 2150. TOEFL Preparation. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to develop and synthesize the main academic language skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) that are assessed by the TOEFL iBT. The course will help students master key test-taking strategies and give students several opportunities to practice the test. The development of a strong academic vocabulary is also a central focus of the course. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT combined score 62-69, or ESL 1500, 1550, and 1560 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 2700. Advanced Reading in English. 4 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Foreign Language requirement. Designed to help ESL students develop reading skills which are necessary for more rigorous academic work. Students will work on higher-level vocabulary development skills, dictionary skills, English usage skills, comprehension skills, and study strategies related to reading in the academic content areas. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Reading score 28-31, or ESL 0500 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 2750. Advanced Academic Writing. 4 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Foreign Language requirement. Designed to help students strengthen and enrich writing skills in academic contexts. Students will focus on moving beyond the standard academic paragraphs to the standard academic essays, and be expected to demonstrate fluency and coherency in English with vocabulary which is increasingly more complex and with few technical errors. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Grammar score 16-18, or ESL 1550 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 2760. Adv English Grammar. 4 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Foreign Language requirement. Designed to help ESL students strengthen and enrich skills in English usage, correct speech and writing forms and patterns, more complicated verb tenses and their related structures, and advanced use of parts of speech. The course will focus on Standard American English usage and conventions. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Grammar score 16-18 or ESL 1560 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 2770. Adv Academic Communication. 4 Hours.

Designed to prepare students for the challenges of college lectures with a wide range of listening, speaking, and note-taking strategies and skills. The course will introduce college lectures in a range of academic disciplines. In addition, the course will ensure that students learn the vocabulary used frequently in academic settings. Students will work with the instructor, in small groups, or with technology to practice the skills presented in this course. The course will also develop classroom presentation skills. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Listening score 19-22, or ESL 0400 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 2780. Academic Speaking 4. 4 Hours.

Designed to help students further develop their interpersonal communication skills in standard American English, this course will offer students guided conversations within carefully structured grammatical frameworks and encourage them to create conversations on their own. In addition, students will practice all-language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course will also develop classroom presentation skills. Offered based on sufficient student need. Prerequisite: CaMLA-ELT Listening score 19-22, or ESL 0411 (Grade B or higher).

ESL 2800. Advanced Experience in International English Studies. 4 Hours.

This is a special course for students who want a brief experience of learning English in the United States, but cannot stay for an entire semester. It will include a four-week exposure to five DSU ESL classes for a total of 4 credits. Must register for this class but for the four weeks of this course they will attend and complete all work required in the following courses: ESL 0611, 0765R, 2700, 2750 and 2760. Course fee required. FA, SP.

French Courses

FREN 1010. Beginning French I. 4 Hours.

For beginning students interested in the French language. Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities are used to develop communicative skills. Cultural awareness is also a component of this class. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including drills, videos, and work in pairs. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take FREN 1020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. FA.

FREN 1020. Beginning French II. 4 Hours.

For students interested in the French language who have completed FREN 1010 or who have equivalent experience (approximately two years of high school French). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Emphasizes developing communicative competence, including speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural awareness. Varied methods are used to teach the class, including videos and drilling concepts. Students using 1020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for FREN 1010 upon passing 1020 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take FREN 2010. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: FREN 1010 or instructor permission. SP.

FREN 2010. Intermediate French I. 4 Hours.

For intermediate-level students who have taken FREN 1020, or for students who have had equivalent experience (four or more years of high school French). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Continued emphasis on communicative competence. Grammatical structures will be reviewed, conversation will be emphasized, and reading and writing will receive increased focus, as well as cultural awareness. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including drills, videos, conversational activities, reading, and lecture. Students using 2010 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2010 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take FREN 2020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: FREN 1020 or instructor permission. FA.

FREN 2020. Intermediate French II. 4 Hours.

For intermediate-level students who have taken FREN 2010. Continued emphasis on communicative competence. Grammatical structures will be reviewed, conversation will be emphasized, and reading and writing will receive increased focus, as well as cultural awareness. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including drills, videos, conversational activities, reading, and lecture. Students using 2010 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2010 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: FREN 2010 or instructor permission. SP.

German Courses

GERM 1010. Beginning German I. 4 Hours.

For beginning students interested in the German language. Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills will help the student begin to develop communicative competence. Discussion of German culture is also a component of this course. Several teaching methods are employed, including lecture, drill practice, videos, and group work. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take GERM 1020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. FA.

GERM 1020. Beginning German II. 4 Hours.

For students interested in the German language who have completed GERM 1010 or who have equivalent experience (approximately two years of high school German). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Continued emphasis on developing communicative skills, including speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural awareness. Several teaching methods are employed, including lecture, drill practice, videos, and group work. Students using 1020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for GERM 1010 upon passing 1020 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts degree or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take GERM 2010. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: GERM 1010 or instructor permission. SP.

GERM 2010. Intermediate German I. 4 Hours.

For intermediate-level students who have taken GERM 1020, or for students who have had equivalent experience (four or more years of high school German). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Continued emphasis on communicative competence. Grammatical structures will be reviewed, conversation will be emphasized, and reading and writing will receive increased focus, as well as cultural awareness. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including role-play and small group activities, discussion of reading materials, and videos. Students using 2010 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2010 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take GERM 2020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: GERM 1020 or instructor permission. FA.

GERM 2020. Intermediate German II. 4 Hours.

For intermediate-level students who have taken GERM 2010. Continued emphasis on communicative competence. Grammatical structures will be reviewed, conversation will be emphasized, and reading and writing will receive increased focus, as well as cultural awareness. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including drills, videos, conversational activities, reading, and lecture. Students using 2010 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2010 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: GERM 2010 or instructor permission. SP.

Humanities Courses

HUM 1000R. Dixie Forum. 1 Hour.

For all students. Introduces students to a variety of speakers presenting lectures or performances on artistic, historic, business, scientific, and other academic topics. Successful completers will attend at least 10 presentations and write brief response papers for each. Repeatable up to 8 credits subject to graduation restrictions. FA, SP.

HUM 1001. FYE: Humanities. 1 Hour.

Designed for freshmen majoring in English or other humanities disciplines, including English, foreign language, and philosophy, this class also helps undecided humanities majors choose a field of study. Assists students to adapt to university life and become integrated into Dixie State University. Students will refine academic skills; create and foster social networks; learn about university resources; and explore degree options, current job opportunities, and various career paths. Multiple listed with all other sections of First Year Experience (all 1001 courses, ENGR 1000). Students may only take one FYE course for credit. FA, SP.

HUM 1010. Humanities Through the Arts. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Literature/Humanities General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For students in all disciplines with an interest in exploring the interrelationship of art, literature, music, philosophy, architecture, sculpture, and other art forms. Enhances appreciation and understanding of all forms of creative human expression. Includes readings, films, group discussions, lectures, and written responses to the humanities through papers and exams. Successful students will demonstrate skill on exams and in discussing, reading and writing about the humanities. FA, SP, SU.

HUM 1040. Non-Western Humanities through the Arts. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Literature/Humanities General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For students in all disciplines with an interest in exploring the interrelationship of non-western art, literature, music, philosophy, architecture, sculpture, and other art forms. Studies the major arts of Eastern cultures in their historical, religious and philosophical settings. Enhances appreciation and understanding of all forms of creative human expression in non-western contexts. Includes readings, films, group discussions, lectures, and written responses to the humanities through papers and exams. Successful students will demonstrate skill on exams and in discussing, reading and writing about the humanities, or as interest demands. FA, SP.

HUM 2990. Seminar In Humanities. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

HUM 3000. Period Studies in Humanities: [Time Period]. 3 Hours.

Takes an introductory, but analytically in-depth approach to the study of a particular period within the humanities (such as the medieval world, Romanticism, or Modernism). Involves study of more than one art form (e.g., music, art, and literature) or discipline (such as literature and philosophy) from the chosen period. Topics vary. Repeatable, with different topics, with a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HUM 3050. Gothic Humanities. 3 Hours.

Explores expressions of goth, gothic and gothicism in Western civilization within various artistic disciplines, including architecture, literature, film and fashion. Specific topics include the role of the Goths in the fall of Rome, medieval architecture, the gothic novel, Victorian medievalism, gothic film and fashion, and present-day, pop-culture gothic iterations, including zombies and vampires. The course aims to discuss the function of these darker artistic expressions and their relevance within the human experience. Prerequisite: Advanced standing.

HUM 3070. The Global Arts: 1900-Today. 3 Hours.

Methods and practices of the discipline are introduced, centered on contemporary issues of globalization, media and the arts, memory and history, and cultural identity formation. Explores the interrelationship of all forms of creative human expression, including art, music, literature, film, architecture, and sculpture. Taught on as needed basis.

HUM 3100. Area Studies in Humanities: [Area]. 3 Hours.

Takes an introductory, but analytically in-depth approach to the study of the humanities produced within a particular geographical area (such as the Soviet Union or Britain). Involves study of more than one art form (e.g., music, art, and literature) or discipline (such as literature and philosophy) from the chosen location. Topics vary. Repeatable, with different topics, with a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HUM 3500. Topics in Humanities: [Topic]. 3 Hours.

Takes an in-depth theoretical and research-based approach to the study of a particular topic within the humanities. Involves study of more than one art form (e.g., music, art, and literature) or discipline (such as literature and philosophy) as related to the chosen topic. Topics vary. Repeatable, with different topics, with a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HUM 4000. Foundations of Dual Language Immersion Education. 3 Hours.

This course is for those seeking Dual Immersion Education endorsement. Emphasizes the theoretical and practical background about Dual Immersion Education. Overview of Dual Language Immersion Education, program models, teaching and learning issues in Dual Language Immersion Programs, and challenges of Dual Language Immersion Programs will be addressed to assist the success of prospective immersion teachers in the classroom. Eligible languages include Spanish, French, Mandarin Chinese, German, and Portuguese. Dual listed with SPAN 4000 and EDUC 4700 (students may only take one course for credit). Prerequisite: Must be admitted to DSU teacher preparation program or have a Utah teaching license. Instructor permission required. FA, SP, SU (Even years).

HUM 4700. Teaching Modern Languages. 3 Hours.

Designed for students intending to teach Modern Languages at primary or secondary schools. Students learn about a wide variety of approaches and methods of language teaching: from teaching trends in the early 20th century to current communicative approaches, as well as a broad range of alternative methods (e.g. Total Physical Response, Suggestopedia, Community Language Learning, Multiple Intelligences, Competency-Based Language Teaching etc.) Also looks critically at traditional dichotomies: explicit versus implicit language instruction, grammar versus communication, foreign language versus mother tongue. The concepts of language awareness, language learning reflection, and learner autonomy will be examined as indicators of a shift in language teaching towards learner centered approaches. In addition, we will also discuss the implications for teachers of recent concerns about standards, assessment, and continuing professional development. FA.

Japanese Courses

JAPN 1010. Beginning Japanese I. 4 Hours.

For beginning students interested in the Japanese language. Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Emphasis on gaining communicative competence by focusing on the development of speaking and listening comprehension skills. Discussion of Japanese culture is also a component of the course. Several teaching methods are employed, including lecture, drill practice, conversation exchanges, videos, lab tapes, and group work. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take JAPN 1020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. FA.

JAPN 1020. Beginning Japanese II. 4 Hours.

For beginning students interested in the Japanese language who have completed JAPN 1010 or who have equivalent experience (approximately two years of high school Japanese). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Continued emphasis on gaining communicative competence by focusing on the development of speaking and listening comprehension skills. Several teaching methods are employed, including lecture, drill practice, conversation exchanges, videos, lab tapes, and group work. Students using 1020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for JAPN 1010 upon passing 1020 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take JAPN 2010. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: JAPN 1010 or instructor permission. SP.

JAPN 2010. Intermediate Japanese I. 4 Hours.

For intermediate-level students who have taken JAPN 1020, or for students who have had equivalent experience (four or more years of high school Japanese). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Continued emphasis on communicative competence. Grammatical structures will be reviewed, conversation will be emphasized, and reading and writing will receive increased focus, as well as cultural awareness. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including drills, videos, conversational activities, reading, and lecture. Students using 2010 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2010 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take JAPN 2020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: JAPN 1020 or instructor permission. FA based on sufficient student need.

JAPN 2020. Intermediate Japanese II. 4 Hours.

For intermediate-level students who have taken JAPN 2010. Continued emphasis on communicative competence. Grammatical structures will be reviewed, conversation will be emphasized, and reading and writing will receive increased focus, as well as cultural awareness. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including drills, videos, conversational activities, reading, and lecture. Students using 2020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2020 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: JAPN 2010 or instructor permission. SP based on sufficient student need.

JAPN 3060. Intermediate Japanese Conversation and Language. 2 Hours.

Focus on the development of all language skills and improvement of pronunciation along with emphasis on grammar review, reading and writing. For non-native Japanese speakers who have a good command of basic Japanese obtained through previous coursework or extended exposure to the Japanese language through military or mission service, etc. Students using JAPN 3060 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level courses upon passing JAPN 3060 with a C grade or higher. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. FA.

JAPN 3070. Japanese History and Culture. 2 Hours.

Focuses on readings in Japanese history and literature with essential characters (hiragana, katakana, and kanji) and vocabulary, and grammatical points. Students using JAPN 3070 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level courses upon passing JAPN 3070 with a C grade or higher. Students who register for this class will have had extended exposure to the Japanese language through previous coursework or military or mission service, etc. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. SP.

JAPN 3990. Seminar in Japanese. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

Philosophy Courses

PHIL 1000. Intro to Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement. Covers the general nature of philosophy, its origins, and its influences on human experience. Offers an introduction to philosophical theories of knowledge, truth, reality, being, science, politics, aesthetics, ethics, values, and religion. Includes examinations requiring essay and objective responses, quizzes, formal essays and informal written responses, participation in class discussions, and group presentations. FA, SP.

PHIL 1120. Social Ethics. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement. For all students interested in philosophy, moral values, and the application of ethics to social issues. Covers the historical development of Western value systems, including the contribution of classical and Hebraic traditions to current personal and political values. Students are also asked to apply ethical theories such as utilitarianism and Kantian formalism to social issues of our day, such as genetic engineering, business practices, world hunger, euthanasia, and war. FA, SP.

PHIL 1250. Reasoning and Rational Decision-Making. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement. Strengthens critical thinking skills through analyzing and evaluating arguments, a basic logical framework, Aristotelian logic, the principles of Charity and Socratic Humility, beginning logic of sentences, fallacies, probability, statistical reasoning, and other forms of inductive argument in order to train students to recognize, evaluate, and construct arguments. FA.

PHIL 2600. World Religions: Topics. 3 Hours.

An approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Comparative study of the tenets of the world's major living religions. Introductory course that will survey the beliefs and practices of at least three of the following traditions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Daoism, Shinto, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Each semester will focus on different traditions, with a three semester 'rotation' between topics. The focus will be on developing an understanding and appreciation of the beliefs and practices of each tradition. Course topics will vary according to instructor emphasis. Repeatable up to 9 credits subject to graduation restrictions.

PHIL 2700. Chinese Political Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Introduction to Chinese thought and politics that examines trends in Chinese politics, specifically developments in Chinese political thought through consideration of important movements in the formation of contemporary China: Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Communism, etc. Dual listed with PHIL 2705; students may take only one course for credit. SU.

PHIL 2705. Travel Study: Chinese Political Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Travel study course providing an introduction to Chinese thought and politics that examines trends in Chinese politics, specifically developments in Chinese political thought through consideration of important movements in the formation of contemporary China: Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Communism, etc. Students will travel to Beijing, Qufu, and Xian. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. SU.

PHIL 2900. Symbolic Logic: The Study of Formal Reasoning. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the study of formal reasoning, with an emphasis placed on discussions of validity and deductive arguments. Besides preparing students for advanced studies (like law school) the study of argument construction also improves critical thinking, research, and writing skills. The study of logic aids in both qualitative and quantitative thought, which can prove an aid for the college experience. SP.

PHIL 3100. Aesthetics: Art and the Beautiful. 3 Hours.

A survey of the major historical sources in aesthetics. Questions surrounding the definition of art and beauty, the interpretation of art, art criticism, the nature of metaphor, and the connection between art and knowledge will be addressed. Through this course students will come to understand the complexity surrounding issues of art and beauty, and gain skill necessary to apply theoretical concepts to personal evaluation of art.

PHIL 3200. Philosophy in Literature: Historical Perspectives. 3 Hours.

A critical study of philosophical material found in works of literature. Or, to put it another way, philosophy presented through the medium of novels, poems, plays, and graphic novels. Authors likely to be studied include Plato, Nietzsche, Dostoyevsky, Sartre, Iris Murdoch, and Voltaire, as well as other contemporary authors.

PHIL 3510. Professional Ethics. 3 Hours.

Designed for business and other pre-professional students. Examination of selected ethical issues in business and technology, e.g., justice, corporate responsibility, preferential treatment, advertising practices, environmental responsibility, confidentiality and privacy, and government regulation. Prerequisite: Advanced Standing. Offered based on sufficient student need.

PHIL 3900. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Explores advanced topics in the field of philosophy. Examples include Epistemology, Metaphysics, Empiricism, Free Will, Philosophy of Mind, Medieval Philosophy, Philosophy of War, or the work of a specific philosopher.

Spanish Courses

SPAN 1001. FYE: Spanish. 1 Hour.

Strongly recommended for entering freshmen and transfer students with 0-24 credits. Designed to help students adapt to college life and become integrated into DSU. Students will refine academic skills, create and foster social networks, learn about college resources, and explore different fields of study, degree options, and career opportunities. Multiple listed with all other sections of FYE (all 1001 courses and ENGR 1000). Students may only take one FYE course for credit. FA.

SPAN 1010. Beginning Spanish I. 4 Hours.

Beginning course for students with little or no Spanish language experience. Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Emphasizes conversation, vocabulary building, and basic grammar. A variety of teaching methods will be employed, including drills, videos, etc. Some discussion of culture is included. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers are prepared to take SPAN 1020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. FA, SP, SU.

SPAN 1020. Beginning Spanish II. 4 Hours.

For students who have completed SPAN 1010 or who have equivalent experience (approximately two years of high school Spanish). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as cultural awareness will be emphasized. Varied methods are used to teach the class, including videos and drilling. Students using 1020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for SPAN 1010 upon passing 1020 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Upon completion of this course you will be prepared to take SPAN 2010. Equivalent experience may substitute for prerequisite. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: SPAN 1010 or instructor permission. FA, SP, SU.

SPAN 2010. Intermediate Spanish I. 4 Hours.

For Intermediate level students who have taken Spanish 1020, or equivalent experience (four or more years of high school Spanish). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Second-year course that emphasizes grammar review, composition, reading and conversation, and cultural awareness. Students using 2010 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level courses upon passing 2010 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts or Bachelor of Arts degree. Successful completers will be prepared to take Spanish 2020. Not for students with extended Spanish language experience abroad. Equivalent experience may substitute for prerequisite. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: SPAN 1020 or instructor permission. FA.

SPAN 2020. Intermediate Spanish II. 4 Hours.

For Intermediate students who have taken Spanish 2010, or equivalent (four or more years of high school Spanish). Continued emphasis on grammar and introduction of authentic literary works to develop reading comprehension at a higher level. Cultural awareness will be emphasized as well. Students using 2020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level courses upon passing 2020 with a C grade or higher. This course, along with one other Spanish course, will partially qualify students to receive an Associate of Arts degree. Not for students with extended Spanish language experience abroad. Successful completers should continue studies with SPAN 3020. Equivalent experience may substitute for prerequisite. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. Prerequisite: SPAN 2010 or instructor permission. SP.

SPAN 2990. Seminar in Spanish. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor. FA.

SPAN 2991. Seminar in Spanish. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

SPAN 3010. Spanish for Heritage Speakers. 3 Hours.

Entry level course designed for students whose home language is Spanish but whose education has been in English. Grammar will be reviewed while emphasizing the mechanics of written Spanish, including syntax, spelling, and the use of accents. Culture and traditions will also be taught. Strongly recommended for heritage Spanish students prior to taking more advanced Spanish courses. Students using 3010 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level courses upon passing with a C grade or higher. FA.

SPAN 3040. Intermediate Grammar and Oral Proficiency. 4 Hours.

Emphasis on oral production through discussion of topics drawn from texts and other media addressing current events. Additionally, the course addresses intermediate grammar topics through reading and listening exercises. Native speakers or those who have acquired intermediate proficiency through extended residence (e.g. native speakers, military service, extended family visits, church missions) are not eligible to take this class. Prerequisite: SPAN 2020.

SPAN 3060. Advanced Grammar, Culture and Composition I. 3 Hours.

Special attention is given to advanced areas of Spanish grammar appropriate for oral argumentation and expository writing and also to distinctions between formal and informal usage. Continued development of conversational and written skills through discussing the different cultural aspects of Spanish-speaking countries, emphasizing the richness of the different cultures as well as dialectal uses of grammar. Critical and creative writing with emphasis on summaries, narratives, and descriptions of a factual nature, and supported opinion. Authentic materials promote the understanding of Hispanic cultures. With the exception of students who obtained their high school diplomas in Spanish speaking countries, students using 3060 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level courses upon passing 3060 with a C grade or higher. Equivalent experience may substitute for prerequisite. FA, SP, SU.

SPAN 3070. Advanced Grammar, Culture and Composition II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of SPAN 3060. Emphasizes advanced grammar with focus on developing research skills. Attention is paid to Spanish/English contrasts, pronoun, tense, aspect, and mood selection; as well as reflexive and passive usage. Grammar skills are developed in conversation, reading and writing. Students are also introduced to linguistic concepts that will help them make their own judgments about grammar and pronunciation. Prerequisite: SPAN 3060. SP.

SPAN 3075. Intro to Spanish Linguistics. 3 Hours.

An introductory course in Spanish Linguistics for advanced students in Spanish. Students will be introduced to the scientific study of languages and to the study of Spanish. Through a theoretical and practical approach, students will discover different branches of study, phonetics, syntax, morphology, geographical variations and the evolution of the language. This course helps students understand the language and will introduces them to linguistics. Students preparing to become teachers will benefit from this course. Prerequisite: SPAN 3060. FA.

SPAN 3080. Spanish Phonetics & Pronunciation. 3 Hours.

Introduction to phonetics and phonology for advanced students of Spanish. Includes both theoretical and practical approaches to studying the Spanish sound system, including comparisons to English. Helps students improve their own or others' pronunciation in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3060. SP.

SPAN 3090. Spanish for the Professions. 3 Hours.

Offers a rotation of topics such as Medical Spanish, Spanish for Law Enforcement, or Spanish for Social Services according to student demand. Focuses on the practical needs of students who seek careers in applicable areas. Addresses the specialized vocabulary and communicative ability necessary for a professional in a bilingual English-Spanish or monolingual Spanish environment. Introduces interpretation in professional situations. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits as topic varies. Prerequisite: SPAN 3040, or SPAN 3060, or instructor permission. FA (even).

SPAN 3116. Pop Culture: Film, Media and Entertainment. 3 Hours.

Considers the role that current film, media, and entertainment play in the Spanish-speaking world. Students in this course will be exposed to the historical and cultural perspectives presented through these media. Proficiency goals: By the end of this course, students will be able to discuss familiar topics as well as some concrete social, academic, and professional topics. They will be able to talk in detail and in an organized way about events and experiences in various time frames, to confidently handle routine situations with an unexpected complication, and to share their point of view in discussions on some complex cultural and historical issues. Prerequisite: Dual Language Immersion and/or Spanish AP Exam (score 3 or higher).

SPAN 3117. Breaking Down Walls, Building Identities. 3 Hours.

This course considers how critical moments of change in the Spanish-speaking world have shaped the present by building new identities. Proficiency Goals: By the end of this course, students will be able to discuss familiar topics as well as some concrete social, academic, and professional topics. Students will utilize interpretive communication skills (listening and reading) in order to speak and write in detail and in an organized way about events and experiences in various time frames, to confidently handle routine situations with an unexpected complication, and to share their point of view in discussions on some complex cultural and historical issues. Prerequisite: Spanish AP Exam (Score 3 or higher).

SPAN 3390. Intro to Spanish Literature. 3 Hours.

Readings in modern Hispanic literature (either Spanish peninsular or Latin American), focusing on formal literary analysis. Prerequisite: SPAN 3060. FA.

SPAN 3570. Contemporary Spanish Culture and Society Through Film. 3 Hours.

Critical approaches to Spanish culture and society from the early 20th century to the present as portrayed in Spanish film. An introduction to filmic textual analysis and discussion of topics such as avant-garde, social art, revolutionary movements, civil war, exile, Francoism, democratic transition, peripheral nationalisms, immigration, cultural diversity, postmodernity, globalization. Prerequisite: SPAN 3060.

SPAN 3580. Contemporary Issues. 3 Hours.

Introduction to contemporary and historical, political, economic, and cultural issues affecting one or more of the countries of Spain and/or Spanish America. Repeatable for credit as topic varies for a total of 9 credits, subject to graduation restrictions. Prerequisite: SPAN 3060. Offered based upon sufficient student need.

SPAN 3950. Hispanics in US Service Learn. 3 Hours.

Service Learning advanced Spanish course looking at a wide variety of issues that affect the lives of Hispanics living in the United States: immigration law, ESL, education, health issues, discrimination, employment, religion, etc. Students will become familiar first hand with these issues working on volunteer projects in a variety of settings such as public schools, hospitals and health clinics, legal service offices, and minority civic centers. Students will do work on a volunteer basis (not for pay) in an area that will be linguistically challenging and therefore will show a gain in Spanish language skills in order to increase cultural awareness and heightened sensitivity for immigrant issues. Prerequisite: SPAN 3060. SP.

SPAN 3990. Seminar in Spanish. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable-credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit hour offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other non-traditional instruction methods. Note that this course is an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

SPAN 4000. Foundations of Dual Language Immersion Education. 3 Hours.

This course is for those seeking Dual Immersion Education endorsement. Emphasizes the theoretical and practical background about Dual Immersion Education. Overview of Dual Language Immersion Education, program models, teaching and learning issues in Dual Language Immersion Programs, and challenges of Dual Language Immersion Programs will be addressed to assist the success of prospective immersion teachers in the classroom. Eligible languages include Spanish, French, Mandarin Chinese, German, and Portuguese. Dual listed with HUM 4000 and EDUC 4700 (students may only take one course for credit). Prerequisites: Must be admitted to DSU teacher preparation program or have a Utah teaching license; Instructor permission required.

SPAN 4510. Business Spanish I. 3 Hours.

Conducted largely in Spanish, provides a solid foundation in the vocabulary and discourse used in Spanish when dealing with different types of companies. Develops cross-cultural communicative competence for business purposes. Also enhances students' geographic literacy and cultural understanding of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: SPAN 3060.

SPAN 4520. Business Spanish II. 3 Hours.

Provides a broad overview of globalization and its impact on international business in Latin America and Spain today. This lecture and discussion format course focuses on the trend of cross-over businesses and markets that have emerged in response to the demographic, social, cultural, political and economic shifts occurring around the globe. Students learn about the determinants of culture and the role culture plays in international business settings. Prerequisite: SPAN 3060.

SPAN 4550. Culture and Civilization of Spain. 3 Hours.

Covers the cultural history of Spain from the Middle Ages to the present, including history, architecture, art, literature music and film, to determine if there is a uniquely Spanish manner of seeing and understanding the world--one which emerges as clearly distinct from the culture of America and other Western European nations. Prerequisite: SPAN 3060. SP.

SPAN 4560. Culture/Customs of Spanish America. 3 Hours.

A study of the historical, cultural, and social influences that created the modern Latin American Society, including differentiating indigenous empires and identifying the legacy of those ancient civilizations; analyzing the complex conquest by Spain and examining the linguistic, social, political, and cultural aspects of Hispanic heritage; reviewing the different quests for independence in the 1800s; distinguishing the social and political aspects of the evolution of modern Latin American political systems; and examining examples of representative artistic and literary production. Prerequisite: SPAN 3060. FA.

SPAN 4610. Spanish Peninsular Literature to 1800. 3 Hours.

Survey of selected periods and themes in Spanish literature of the Iberian Peninsula. Students will examine the most important literary texts, trends, genres, and literary, cultural, and philosophical theories from the Middle Ages to 18th Century through class discussions and lectures, analysis of readings, online databases, and videos. Prerequisite: SPAN 3390. FA (odd).

SPAN 4620. Spanish Peninsular Literature From 1800. 3 Hours.

Survey of selected periods and themes in Spanish literature of the Iberian Peninsula. Readings of masterpieces by great writers chosen from the 18th Century to the present will be examined through lectures, oral discussions, and written reports in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3390. SP (even).

SPAN 4625. Generation of '98. 3 Hours.

Examines the historical and social background of major authors and its works around the so called "disaster of 1898". Class discussion will focus on novels, poetry, and essays of this famous group of writers (Miguel de Unamuno, Pio Baroja, Antonio Machado, Ramon del Valle Inclan, and others). Prerequisite: SPAN 3390 (Grade C or higher), or instructor permission.

SPAN 4630. Spanish American Lit to 1880. 3 Hours.

Survey of selected periods and themes in Spanish American literature, covering texts from the pre-Hispanic, European exploration, and colonization of the Americas (1492-1826) periods in order to study a topic of interest in Spanish American literature and culture through reading and thinking critically about a wide variety of literary and cultural texts, including letters, chronicles, essays, poetry, and fiction. Prerequisite: SPAN 3390. FA (even).

SPAN 4640. Spanish American Lit From 1880. 3 Hours.

Survey of selected periods and themes in Spanish American literature, covering texts from independence to the present in order to study a topic of interest in Spanish American literature and culture through reading and thinking critically about a wide variety of literary and cultural texts, including romantic allegories of the nation, modernism and postmodernism, avant-garde poetry, regionalism versus cosmopolitanism, indigenous and indigenist literature, magical realism and literature of the boom, Afro-Hispanic literature, and testimonial narrative. Prerequisite: SPAN 3390. SP (odd).

SPAN 4700. Teaching Modern Languages. 3 Hours.

Designed for students intending to teach foreign/modern languages in primary or secondary schools. Teaching methods course that includes a wide variety of approaches to and methods of teaching language, including alternative methods and traditional dichotomies such as explicit versus implicit language instruction, grammar versus communication, and foreign language versus mother tongue. Examines concepts of language awareness, language learning reflection, and learner autonomy as indicators of a shift in language teaching towards learner-centered approaches. Discusses the implications of concerns about standards, assessment, and continuing professional development. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA.

SPAN 4800. Spanish Senior Capstone. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Spanish capstone requirement. This course is designed to be a culminating experience in which the student will demonstrate skills and knowledge garnered from his/her experience within the Spanish program. The Spanish major will research, write and revise an extensive research paper under the supervision of a Spanish faculty member. The capstone topic selected will directly relate to the language, literature, culture, history and/or civilization of the Spanish-speaking peoples of the world. The student will present the results of his/her research in a public forum at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: Senior status, Spanish major, and instructor permission. FA, SP.

Faculty

Department Chair

Clinton Buhler, Ph.D.

Professor

Leonor Ceballos Ph.D. (Spanish)

Associate Professor

Michael Cartmill, Ph.D. (Spanish)

Assistant Professors

Luis Arévalo, Ph.D. (Spanish)

Clinton Buhler, Ph.D. (Humanities)

Allyson Hamilton, Ed.D. (ASL)

Melanie Hinton, Ph.D. (Humanities)

Lucia Taylor, Ph.D. (Spanish)

John Wolfe, Ph.D. (Philosophy)

Lecturer/Advisor

Ron Gill, Ed.D. (Spanish)