Social & Behavioral Sciences

McDonald Center

(435) 652-7881

https://socialscience.dixie.edu/

To find faculty & staff phone numbers and email addresses, please consult the University Directory.

Department Chair
Robert Carlson, Ph.D.

Administrative Assistant for Social & Behavioral Sciences
Hope Mullins

Advisors
Aaron Combs, M.S. Psychology Lecturer/Advisor
Craig Demke, B.A., Psychology Lecturer/Advisor
Kamil Taylor-Diggs, Criminal Justice Lecturer/Advisor

Dean
Richard Featherstone, Ph.D.

Administrative Specialist
Christine Arlotti

Social & Behavioral Sciences

The Social & Behavioral Sciences Department (SBS) is comprised of the Criminal Justice Program, the Psychology Program, the Sociology Program, and courses in Anthropology, and Social Work. The overarching focus of the SBS Department is to foster understanding of humans and societies. Students are provided opportunities to learn through traditional coursework, internships, and research. The strength of the SBS Department is the emphasis on developing critical thinking, the search for knowledge by means of scientific methods and research, integration of a variety of theoretical perspectives, and promoting a lifetime pursuit of knowledge and understanding. Some courses in the Social and Behavioral Sciences fulfill the General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences and Global and Cultural Perspectives requirements for all students. Coursework in the Social and Behavioral Sciences also fulfills the prerequisites and requirements for students planning to pursue careers in medical and health sciences.

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 1000. Introduction to Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Social & Behavioral Science requirement. Anthropology is the study of humankind, past and present. This course provides an introduction to the four sub-disciplines within Anthropology: Biological and cultural anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics.

ANTH 1010. Cultural Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Fullfills General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. An introduction to cultural anthropology. This course examines how the concept of culture allows students to understand similarities and differences in behavior and values in human societies. Human behavior varies widely over time and space, which will be explored by focusing on different cultures always making comparisons that will help students to better understand their own culture.

Criminal Justice Courses

CJ 1001. FYE: Criminal Justice. 1 Hour.

First Year Experience course designed to help freshmen interested in criminal justice become acquainted with the discipline, this course will also help students adapt to university life and become integrated into Dixie State University. Students will refine academic skills; create and foster social networks; learn about university resources; and explore degree options, current job opportunities, and various career paths. Multiple listed with all other sections of First Year Experience (all 1001 courses, ENGR 1000). Students may only take one FYE course for credit. FA, SP.

CJ 1010. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, law, private or industrial security, counseling, or criminology, and persons interested in the functioning of the U. S. criminal justice system. Examines the criminal justice system, police, courts, corrections, and related government functions and agencies. Identifies and explores problems, issues and trends in criminal justice. Uses a variety of teaching methods, including lecture, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. This course is required for the associate's degree in Criminal Justice and prepares students for bachelor's degree work. FA, SP.

CJ 1070. Special Function Officer Training (POST I). 6 Hours.

Restricted to students enrolled in Module I of the law enforcement academy program leading to State certification as a Special Function Officer. Counts as elective credit toward an AS or BS in criminal justice for completion of Module I of the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certification. Course work includes physical training, administration, certification, career orientation, criminal and traffic laws, and the proper means of enforcing them. Ethics and professionalism as well as police community relations are emphasized. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule.

CJ 1080. Law Enforcement Training (POST II), Part I. 6 Hours.

Restricted to students enrolled in Module II of the law enforcement academy program leading to State Certification as a Law Enforcement Officer Training. Counts as elective credit towards an AS or BS in criminal justice for completion of Module II of the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certification. Course includes physical training, completes the first portion of the law enforcement training required by the state of Utah to become law enforcement officer certified. Emphasizes firearms, emergency vehicle operation, and arrest, control techniques. Course fee required. Prerequisite(s): CJ 1070 and instructor permission. SP.

CJ 1090. Law Enforcement Training (POST II), Part II. 7 Hours.

Restricted to students enrolled in Module II of the law enforcement academy program leading to State Certification as a Law Enforcement Officer Training. Counts as elective credit towards an AS or BS in criminal justice for completion of Module II of the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certification. Course includes physical training, completes the second portion of the law enforcement training required by the state of Utah to become law enforcement officer certified. Emphasizes firearms, emergency vehicle operation, and arrest, control techniques. Course fee required. Prerequisite(s): CJ 1080 and instructor permission. SU.

CJ 1300. Intro to Corrections. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, law, or criminology. Examines corrections philosophy, history, punishment of offenders, and rehabilitation. Also identifies problems, issues and trends in the corrections system. Uses lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. Develops a foundation for a career in corrections or law enforcement. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (can be concurrently enrolled); AND CJ 1010. FA.

CJ 1330. Criminal Law. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement; adult or juvenile corrections; law, private or industrial security; or criminology, as well as those who may desire to learn about criminal law in society. Provides a foundational understanding of criminal law, including crimes and defenses, as well as the historical foundation, limits, purposes, and functions of criminal law, using lectures, videos, guest lecturers, and assigned text study. Prerequisite: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 1340. Criminal Investigation. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, or law. Includes interviewing witnesses and suspects; techniques in the collection and preservation of evidence; crime scene processing, including some post-crime scene processing of evidence; follow-up investigation and recent techniques of enhancing the criminal investigation function. Also provides an opportunity for in depth examination of the investigation needs of certain crimes using lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. Prerequisite: ACT score of 28; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 1390. Police Field Operations. 3 Hours.

Provides students with the knowledge needed by patrol and field officers, including an understanding of report writing as well as officer field note taking. Covers interviewing witnesses, search, seizure, arrest, and custody. Course covers Tennessee v. Gardner and the use of force doctrine and how it applies in field operations. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (can be concurrently enrolled); AND CJ 1010. Offered based on sufficient student need.

CJ 1900. Introduction to Computer Related Crime. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course for those students interested in learning about criminal investigations through digital forensics. Introduces computer crime through an overview of the criminal acts that can be committed using a computer or the Internet, and how those acts can be successfully investigated. Also includes the legal aspects of search and seizure, proper procedures for handling digital evidence in relation to the rules of evidence, and the use of basic imaging equipment. Course fee required. FA, SP.

CJ 2020. Criminal Justice Supervision. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, or law. Covers principles of supervision, including motivation, discipline, evaluation, scheduling, work assignments, stress management and functioning of line and staff, using lectures, videos, guest lecturers, practical problem solving, and text study. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher); AND CJ 1010. SP.

CJ 2330. Juvenile Justice. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, law, criminology, school counseling, or teaching. Examines the origin, philosophy and development of the juvenile justice system, juvenile court, relationship of various segments of the juvenile justice system and also examines theories of juvenile criminality and trends in treatment. Uses lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. Provides a foundation for work with juveniles. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher); AND CJ 1010. SP.

CJ 2350. Laws of Evidence. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, law, or criminology. Deals with the principles and rules of law emphasizing evidentiary problems related to criminal cases. Uses lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. Provides a foundation for work in the criminal justice field or for students intending to attend the law enforcement or corrections academy. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher); AND CJ 1010. FA, SP.

CJ 2360. Juvenile Law & Procedure. 3 Hours.

Covers the causes and treatments of juvenile delinquency, including both conventional and non-conventional theoretical perspectives and solutions to the juvenile crime problem. Specific topics include: the nature of delinquency, theories in delinquency, female delinquency, gang behavior, and institutional care. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher); AND CJ 1010. FA.

CJ 2500. A+ Computer Hardware/Windows OS. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course introducing basic hardware and software using lecture and hands-on, practical application. Successful completion of the course prepares students to pass the A+ certification exam, the standard in foundational, vendor-neutral computer certification. Dual listed with IT 1200 (students may take only one course for credit). Course fee required. FA.

CJ 2700. Introduction to Digital Forensics. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course introducing the digital forensics process, including evidence processing, preservation, analysis, and presentation. Also includes digital evidence basics, data recovery, and some cyber law issues. Requires 6 hours of lab work on a Windows based machine each week. Course fee required. FA, SP.

CJ 2990. Seminar in Criminal Justice. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

CJ 2991. Seminar in Criminal Justice. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

CJ 3100. Profiling Deviant Behavior. 3 Hours.

An historical and theoretical exploration of deviant behavior specifically analyzing particular forms of deviant behavior such as murder and rape, among other crimes. These topics will be discussed using the criminal thinking approach, sociopathic and psychopathic behavior analysis, and life course perspectives. Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (all Grade C or higher); AND CJ 1010 or PSY 1010 (all Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 3200. Policing in U.S. Society. 3 Hours.

Explores law enforcement at the local, state, and federal levels, introducing the nature of policing, a history of policing in the United States, different types of law enforcement agencies, different roles of police in our society, how police respond to crime, problems in policing, and experiences of police officers. Prerequisites: CJ 1010; AND ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher). SP.

CJ 3250. Private Security. 3 Hours.

Examines external and internal private security measures; confidential personnel investigations and interview procedures. Studies principle and major concepts in prevention, protection, loss control and crime prevention in the commercial sector. Gives students a general overview of the role private security plays in modern society. The course will also introduce students to real-world concepts and applications and includes detailed coverage of everything from industry background and related law to premises, retails, business, employment, and information/computer security as well as surveillance, and even homeland security.

CJ 3270. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Focuses on theories and research of crime causation, using a variety of criminological theories to analyze biological, psychological, and social factors that have been shown to contribute to criminal behavior. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 3300. Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes the practical application of basic research practices to tests of criminological theory as well as law enforcement and corrections problems. Students gain the knowledge necessary to interpret pertinent research in their area of interest. Prerequisites: CJ 1010 (Grade C- or higher) AND ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C- or higher, or ACT score 28 or higher), AND MATH 1040 (Grade C- or higher). FA.

CJ 3320. Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

Examines procedural requirements for judicial processing of criminal offenders, including the rights of the accused, general court procedures, trial preparation, and principal constitutional law as applicable to criminal justice practitioners. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). Offered based on sufficient student need.

CJ 3350. American Jails and Prisons. 3 Hours.

Examines the American penal system with particular emphasis on history, management, operations, focusing on the contemporary, adult prison with a particular emphasis upon contemporary problems, issues, and dilemmas. Diversity topics such as integration of the prison work force by women and minorities as well as the problems of elderly, women, and minority inmates will be examined. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA.

CJ 3400. Drugs and Crime. 3 Hours.

Explains the international aspect of the growth, production and distribution of controlled dangerous substances, including the manufacture, cultivation, and distribution of controlled dangerous substances in the United States as well as strategies that have been used to combat the problem. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). SP.

CJ 3500. White Collar Crime. 3 Hours.

Examines white collar crime, specifically exploring the definitions of white collar crime and how it is prosecuted. Describes the theories used to best understand participation in this type of criminal behavior. Addresses the punitive measures implemented in white collar cases and ethical issues surrounding these measures. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). Offered based on sufficient student need.

CJ 3550. Crime, Media, and Culture. 3 Hours.

This class concerns the representations of crime and the criminal justice system in the media. Television, film, news organizations, music, and electronic/internet media intersects with crime and the criminal justice system in a number of important ways. The point of this course is to examine how the media represents, distorts, and/or filters crime and justice issues. We will explore the impact the media has on public perceptions of crime and society, criminals, and the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: CJ 3270 (Grade C- or higher) (can be concurrently enrolled).

CJ 3600. The Criminal-Life Course. 3 Hours.

Covers developmental trajectories of criminal behavior, beginning with the question, "what are the origins of delinquency?" Breaks into three sections: 1) The nature vs. nurture debate, 2) Investigates persistence and desistance of criminal behavior from childhood through adolescence (framed by the social psychological factors influencing crime), and 3) Examines criminal careers of people who persist in crime through adulthood. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA.

CJ 3710. Crimes Against Humanity. 3 Hours.

A multi-disciplinary examination of the emergence and impact of modern conceptions of human rights. Examines institutions such as International War Tribunals and Peace and Reconciliation Commissions. Particular attention paid to the theories and causes of genocide. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled). SP.

CJ 3810. Advanced Digital Forensics. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course exploring advanced issues in digital forensics. Topics will be determined by student interest, but may include lab assignment involving current issues such as steganography, encrypted file systems, advanced data recovery, and digital triage. Helps prepare students for advanced digital forensics courses through project work and advanced tool introduction. Requires 6 hours of lab work each week. Course fee required. Prerequisite: CJ 2700 (Grade C- or higher). FA.

CJ 3830. International Criminal Justice Systems. 3 Hours.

Examines the influences of the history, religion, ethnicity, and traditions of other nations on the development of their respective legal systems. Examines the respective distinctions between other countries and compares them with the political practices and legal systems of the USA. Consult course schedule for rotation. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (Grade C- or higher); can be concurrently enrolled.

CJ 3900. Digital Forensics Tools. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course designed to familiarize students with tools available to the digital forensic examiner. Topics include examination of email messages, deleted files, free space, file slack, and password recovery. In addition, students will learn to search for and export graphic files, gain access to encrypted files, and prepare basic forensic examination reports. Commercial tool certification training and opportunities available dependent on time and funds. This course is pared with CJ 3950. Requires 6 hours in the lab each week. Course fee required. Prerequisite: CJ 1900 or CJ 2700 (Grade C- or higher). FA.

CJ 3950. Digital Forensics Tools II. 3 Hours.

Continues the exploration of digital forensics tools from CJ 3900. This course explores more advanced digital forensic tools in use by digital forensics examiners. In addition advanced report writing will be covered to include digital forensics report formats, HTML with digital forensic report writing, and child exploitation reports. Commercial tool certification training and opportunities available dependent on time and funds. Requires 6 hours of lab work each week. Course fee required. Prerequisite: CJ 3900 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

CJ 4020. Urban Crime. 3 Hours.

Focuses on crime in the inner-city, the most crime-riddled areas in our country; examines urban crime typologies and their possible causes. Specifically, this course covers gang violence, the illegitimate economy of the inner-city, the policies designed to help combat the high crime rates of urban areas, and more. Prerequisite: CJ 3270. FA.

CJ 4100. Social Control. 3 Hours.

Closely examines the mechanisms of social control, including formal means through the criminal justice system and informal means through familial and communal institutions. Covers punitive measures used in the criminal justice system, the behavioral influence of social control mechanisms, the ethics of policies of social control, and more. Prerequisite: CJ 3270. FA.

CJ 4150. Criminal Justice Reform. 3 Hours.

Examines criminal justice reform. Topics may include bail, capital punishment, incarceration, juvenile justice, restorative justice, prisoner reentry, among others. Students will be introduced to potential reforms. Consult course schedule for rotation. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (Grade C- or higher).

CJ 4200. Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, law, or criminology. Examines criminal justice system, police, courts, corrections, and related government functions and agencies, identifying and exploring ethical problems, issues, and trends. Prerequisite: CJ 3270.

CJ 4240. Delinquency & Social Responsibility. 3 Hours.

Considers the statement: all crime is deviant but not all deviance is criminal. Breaks into three sections: 1. Reviews the origins, development, and reactions societies have to violations of codified law, 2. Considers what role a society plays in the creation and management of criminal behavior, and 3. Develops a plan for future laws and social policies designed to address criminal behavior. Prerequisite: CJ 3270. SP.

CJ 4260. The Criminology & Policy of Terrorism. 3 Hours.

Traces the history, causes and manifestations of terrorism, and reflects on the changes the 'War on Terrorism' has brought about for national and human security and for human rights. Also includes assessments of the responses to terrorism by domestic and international organizations, intelligence services and courts and trough diplomacy, criminal investigations, military action, etc. Prerequisites: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled) AND CJ 3300 (can be concurrently enrolled). Offered basd on sufficient student need.

CJ 4500. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of theoretical issues in criminal justice. Students will engage in research and presentations on a topic selected by the instructor. Repeatable as topic varies up to 9 credits. Consult course schedule for rotation. Prerequisite: CJ 3270.

CJ 4700. File System Analysis. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course which provides the analysis for digital media at the file system level, including NTFS, FAT, and less popular file systems. Requires 6 hours of lab work each week. Course fee required. Prerequisites: CJ 2700 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

CJ 4750. Small Device Forensics. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course exploring the digital forensic examination of various small scale digital devices such as personal digital assistants, cell phones, GPS devices, and MP3 players. Focuses on specific search and seizure issues with these devices, how forensic challenges differ from those present with personal computers, and the technical issues commonly encountered during examination. Requires 6 hours of lab work each week. Course fee required. Prerequisite: CJ 2700 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

CJ 4780. Digital Forensics Capstone. 3 Hours.

Capstone course for students seeking the digital forensics emphasis in the bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice with an emphasis in Digital Forensics or the Certificate of Completion in Computer Forensics. Involves a semester-long project overseen by a member of the faculty. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. SP.

CJ 4790. Capstone Research in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Criminal Justice capstone requirement. Requires consolidation of information, skills, and knowledge learned throughout students' undergraduate studies, particularly in the core and research areas, to conduct independent research to further develop their understanding of criminology as a science, contemporary issues and techniques in digital forensics, and/or other criminal justice topics. Prerequisite: CJ 3300, Criminal Justice major, and Senior status. FA, SP.

CJ 4860R. Criminology Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Students work with local or regional agencies or institutions or faculty on professional research. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Offered upon sufficient student need. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

CJ 4875. Criminal Justice Sr Practicum. 1 Hour.

Designed to help seniors graduating in criminal justice become acquainted with career opportunities and to prepare resumes for employment or graduate school. Students will refine interview skills; create and foster social networks with local employers; learn about graduate school resources; and explore post-graduate options. Prerequisites: CJ Major and Senior standing. SP.

CJ 4890R. Criminal Justice Internship. 1-3 Hours.

Internship in Criminal Justice emphasizing service-learning and community involvement. Provides actual work experience on a paid or volunteer basic in a criminal justice profession or related approved work situation. Credit hours are dependent on hours worked and other agreed-upon student outcomes. Repeatable up to 3 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP.

CJ 4900. Current Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of current issues in criminal justice, with all areas of the Criminal Justice system open to investigation. Including, but not limited to policing, legal, and corrections challenges as well as private industry demands on justice systems. Current issues topics selected by the instructor. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

Philosophy Courses

PHIL 1000. Intro to Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement. Covers the general nature of philosophy, its origins, and its influences on human experience. Offers an introduction to philosophical theories of knowledge, truth, reality, being, science, politics, aesthetics, ethics, values, and religion. Includes examinations requiring essay and objective responses, quizzes, formal essays and informal written responses, participation in class discussions, and group presentations. FA, SP.

PHIL 1120. Social Ethics. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement. For all students interested in philosophy, moral values, and the application of ethics to social issues. Covers the historical development of Western value systems, including the contribution of classical and Hebraic traditions to current personal and political values. Students are also asked to apply ethical theories such as utilitarianism and Kantian formalism to social issues of our day, such as genetic engineering, business practices, world hunger, euthanasia, and war. FA, SP.

PHIL 1250. Reasoning and Rational Decision-Making. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement. Strengthens critical thinking skills through analyzing and evaluating arguments, a basic logical framework, Aristotelian logic, the principles of Charity and Socratic Humility, beginning logic of sentences, fallacies, probability, statistical reasoning, and other forms of inductive argument in order to train students to recognize, evaluate, and construct arguments. FA.

PHIL 2600. World Religions: Topics. 3 Hours.

An approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Comparative study of the tenets of the world's major living religions. Introductory course that will survey the beliefs and practices of at least three of the following traditions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Daoism, Shinto, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Each semester will focus on different traditions, with a three semester 'rotation' between topics. The focus will be on developing an understanding and appreciation of the beliefs and practices of each tradition. Course topics will vary according to instructor emphasis. Repeatable up to 9 credits subject to graduation restrictions.

PHIL 2700. Chinese Political Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Introduction to Chinese thought and politics that examines trends in Chinese politics, specifically developments in Chinese political thought through consideration of important movements in the formation of contemporary China: Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Communism, etc. Dual listed with PHIL 2705; students may take only one course for credit. SU.

PHIL 2705. Travel Study: Chinese Political Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Travel study course providing an introduction to Chinese thought and politics that examines trends in Chinese politics, specifically developments in Chinese political thought through consideration of important movements in the formation of contemporary China: Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Communism, etc. Students will travel to Beijing, Qufu, and Xian. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. SU.

PHIL 2900. Symbolic Logic: The Study of Formal Reasoning. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the study of formal reasoning, with an emphasis placed on discussions of validity and deductive arguments. Besides preparing students for advanced studies (like law school) the study of argument construction also improves critical thinking, research, and writing skills. The study of logic aids in both qualitative and quantitative thought, which can prove an aid for the college experience. SP.

PHIL 3100. Aesthetics: Art and the Beautiful. 3 Hours.

A survey of the major historical sources in aesthetics. Questions surrounding the definition of art and beauty, the interpretation of art, art criticism, the nature of metaphor, and the connection between art and knowledge will be addressed. Through this course students will come to understand the complexity surrounding issues of art and beauty, and gain skill necessary to apply theoretical concepts to personal evaluation of art.

PHIL 3200. Philosophy in Literature: Historical Perspectives. 3 Hours.

A critical study of philosophical material found in works of literature. Or, to put it another way, philosophy presented through the medium of novels, poems, plays, and graphic novels. Authors likely to be studied include Plato, Nietzsche, Dostoyevsky, Sartre, Iris Murdoch, and Voltaire, as well as other contemporary authors.

PHIL 3510. Professional Ethics. 3 Hours.

Designed for business and other pre-professional students. Examination of selected ethical issues in business and technology, e.g., justice, corporate responsibility, preferential treatment, advertising practices, environmental responsibility, confidentiality and privacy, and government regulation. Prerequisite: Advanced Standing. Offered based on sufficient student need.

PHIL 3900. Topics in Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Explores advanced topics in the field of philosophy. Examples include Epistemology, Metaphysics, Empiricism, Free Will, Philosophy of Mind, Medieval Philosophy, Philosophy of War, or the work of a specific philosopher.

Psychology Courses

PSY 1001. FYE: Psychology/Social Science. 1 Hour.

For students interested in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Archeology, Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies, and Political Science). This course is designed to help students set the conditions to maximize their university experience. In particular, this course will help students understand and adapt to university life and expectations, refine university level skills and abilities, create and foster social networks, and introduce them to different fields of study, degree options, and career opportunities within the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Multiple listed with all other sections of First Year Experience (all 1001 courses, ENGR 1000). Students may only take one FYE course for credit.

PSY 1010. General Psychology. 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. For students in all disciplines who are interested in the fundamental scientific principles of behavior. Includes the study of learning, motivation, emotion, personality, mental disorders, treatment alternatives, and other related subjects as part of the course. Critical thinking will be explored in examining these aspects of behavior. Students will have frequent examinations and quizzes as part of the course requirements. FA, SP, SU.

PSY 1100. Human Development Through Lifespan. 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement and is an approved Global & Cultural Perspectives course. For all students who are interested in knowing how and why people change through the course of a lifetime. Covers biological, cognitive, and social changes from prenatal development to late adulthood. Studies scientific methods of collecting and interpreting data, analyzes developmental events from various perspectives, and focuses on applying this knowledge to one's own development. Utilizes textbook reading, tests, quizzes, and journal writing. Dual listed with FCS 1500 (students may take only one course for credit). FA, SP, SU.

PSY 1210. Psychology of Personal Growth. 3 Hours.

For all students who have a desire to increase self-awareness, understanding, and personal growth. Includes information on social influences, stress, health issues, communication, relationships, and challenges associated with marriage, child rearing, work, and aging. Uses textbook readings, group discussions, and journal writing to explore past and present decisions and to make future choices to promote personal growth toward self-actualization and fulfillment. Completion of PSY 1010 is recommended before enrolling in this course. SP.

PSY 2000. Writing in Psychology: APA Style. 3 Hours.

Required of psychology majors and recommended for students in all disciplines interested in understanding and more effectively using APA writing style. An introduction to the effective use and application of APA style for research projects, technical papers, and expository writing in the psychological and behavioral sciences. Prerequisites: PSY 1010; AND ENGL 2010; AND Psychology major OR Integrated Studies major with emphasis in Psychology. FA, SP.

PSY 2430. Stress Management. 3 Hours.

For students of all disciplines who wish to learn more about the stress response. Sources of stress, physiological and psychological responses to stress and other components of stress will be investigated. Students will be given relaxation training through several alternative approaches. Includes examinations from the text, completion of self-appraisals, and self-exploration through written exercises. FA.

PSY 2480. Substance Abuse: Prevention. 3 Hours.

For students of all disciplines wishing to expand their awareness of the effects of drugs on the human body, to learn more about local, state, and federal laws regulating the use of drugs and alcohol, to become acquainted with information which identifies and describes characteristics of users, and to recognize healthy lifestyles as a viable alternative to substance abuse. Course requires reading, in-class oral presentation, and examinations from the textbook. SP.

PSY 2800. Human Sexuality in a Diverse Society. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social & Behavioral Science General Education and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Provides a basic understanding of the academic and scientific study of human sexuality with an emphasis on diversity in human sexuality. Human sexuality is examined from multiple perspectives; including historical, religious, biological, psychological, sociological, anthropological, and political; as well as medical, ethical and legal issues. The course is intended to provide an in-depth, college-level understanding of the foundations and diversity of human sexuality. FA, SP.

PSY 3000. Statistical Methods/Psychology. 4 Hours.

Required of Psychology majors. An introduction to and application of statistical methods in psychological research. Students will design and measure psychological constructs; select, compute, and interpret descriptive and inferential statistics; use computer technology to facilitate statistical analyses; accurately represent the results of statistical analyses; and critically analyze methodological and statistical arguments. Combined lecture/lab. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 (Grade C or higher); and MATH 1040; AND Psychology Major or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3010. Research Methods in Psychology. 4 Hours.

Required of Psychology majors. An introduction to the research process; deductive and inductive reasoning in science, the nature of theory, hypothesis testing and the use of empirical data; scientific knowledge and its applications. Naturalistic, case study, correlation, and experimental research methods in Psychology will be examined. Combined lecture / lab. Prerequisites: PSY 3000; Psychology Major or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3040. Psychology of Gender. 3 Hours.

For Behavioral Science majors and others interested in gender issues from a psychological perspective. Examines the topic of gender behaviors and attitudes that relate to (but are not entirely congruent with) biological sex. Discusses biological influences on gender, gender differences, gender development, and the influence of gender on various dimensions of daily life. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission.

PSY 3100. Profiling Deviant Behavior. 3 Hours.

An historical and theoretical exploration of deviant behavior specifically analyzing particular forms of deviant behavior such as murder and rape, among other crimes. These topics will be discussed using the criminal thinking approach, sociopathic and psychopathic behavior analysis, and life course perspectives. Dual listed with CJ 3100 (students may only take one course for credit). Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (both Grade C or higher), AND CJ 1010 or PSY 1010 (both Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3120. Cognitive Psychology. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic principles of human and non-human cognition. Topics include perception, categorization, attention, memory, knowledge representation, judgment and decision making, and problem solving. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, Social Science Composite Teaching, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3200. Development in Infancy & Childhood. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social/Developmental Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Covers the theories and research on prenatal development, pregnancy and birth, infants' sensory and motor capabilities, brain development, attachment, children's understanding of their physical and social world, pretense and theory of mind, language and reasoning, self-concept, parent-child and peer relations, self-control and morality. Biological, cognitive and social-cultural perspectives will be considered. Prerequisites: PSY 1100 or FCS 1500; AND PSY 2000 or BIO 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA.

PSY 3220. Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social/Developmental Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Provides a basic understanding of key developmental transitions during adolescence and emerging adulthood (e.g., biological, cognitive, social and emotional), some of the contexts in which these transitions are situated (e.g., family, school, culture) and how these transitions and contexts might interact with one another. Prerequisites: PSY 1100 or FCS 1500 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. SP.

PSY 3230. Adult Development & Aging. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social/Developmental Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. The study of adult lives from a life-span perspective. In addition to the psychology of aging, students will investigate societal influences on aging. Topics include theories of the life-cycle, identity formation, the experience of growing older, personality stability, and psychological adjustment to the myths and realities of age. Prerequisites: PSY 1100 or FCS 1500 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIO 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA.

PSY 3320. Survey of Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the basics of clinical psychology. The focus will be on introductory clinical helping skills and theory. This course stresses the importance of theory, quality research, prevention, assessment skills, and clinical abilities in interventions. Topics discussed will include real world application, skill role modeling, and critical evaluation of techniques and clinical issues. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3400 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. SP (odd).

PSY 3400. Psychology of Abnormal Behavior. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Clinical/Applied Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. An advanced course for students of all disciplines who wish to study the nature of mental disorders. Particularly important for students majoring in psychology, criminal justice, or education. Course will cover DSM IV diagnostic categories with descriptive information concerning etiology, symptomatology and therapeutic strategies. Requires college reading level skills and will require library research. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, Social Science Composite Teaching, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3410. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social/Developmental Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. The scientific study of how individuals' thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by other people. Topic areas include identity, social perception, attitudes, persuasion, conformity and obedience, stereotypes and prejudice, group conflict, aggression and violence, helping behavior, and interpersonal relationships. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3420. Psy of Culture & Diversity. 3 Hours.

Designed to deepen appreciation and understanding of cross-cultural research and its applications as well as the influence of culture on all aspects of psychology. Covers theory and research on the values, norms, group behavior, socialization, cognitive development, and psychopathology in comparative cultural perspective. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. SP (odd).

PSY 3440. Child & Family Mental Health. 3 Hours.

Provides a basic understanding of the emerging field of family mental health. Family mental health considers parent and child development (biological, cognitive, social and emotional), family relationships and family functioning. The course will include an introduction to observation, screening and assessment, diagnosis and intervention and interdisciplinary / multidisciplinary collaboration in the field of family mental health. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 (Grade C or higher) and PSY 1100 or FCS 1500; AND Psychology major or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology; or instructor permission. SP.

PSY 3450. Intro to Child Life Theory & Practice. 3 Hours.

Provides an introduction to the theory and practice of the child life profession as a field in developmental psychology and family centered care when children have an acute, chronic, or life-threatening illness and traumatic injuries. Topics include children's emotional reactions to hospitalization, use of play, preparation, family support, designing healing environments, and specializations within the field. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 (Grade C or higher); AND ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher) or ACT placement of 28 or higher; AND PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology Major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA.

PSY 3460. Health Psychology. 3 Hours.

Examines the relationship between psycho-social factors and health and provides a broad overview using the basic concepts, theories, methods, and applications of health psychology. Course will critically examine state-of-the-art research as well as current gaps in knowledge to explore topics including: definitions and vice-versa, patient-practitioner relations, and health promotion. Emphasis will be placed on the ways psychological factors interact with the social, cultural, economic, and environmental contexts of health. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3480. Psychology of Sports & Exercise. 3 Hours.

Examines the relationship between psychosocial factors and sports and exercise. Provides a broad overview of the basic concepts, theories, methods, and applications of sports psychology. Emphasis will be placed on the ways psychological factors interact with the social, developmental, and environmental contexts of sports and exercise. Offered upon sufficient student need. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 and PSY 2000 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission.

PSY 3700. Personality Theory. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social/Developmental Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Offers students the opportunity for expanded self-understanding and understanding of others based on established personality theories. Primary focus is on presentation and discussion of diverse theoretical views of personality and personality development. Prerequisites: PSY 1010; AND PSY 2000 or BIO 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3710. Behavioral Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Biological/Cognitive Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Introduction to how the structure and function of the brain and the nervous system relate to specific psychological processes and overt behaviors including cognitive functions, sensory and motor systems, emotions, regulatory behaviors, reproductive behaviors, and psychopathology. Completion of PSY 3000 and 3010 is recommended before enrolling in this course. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010 (Grade C or higher); or BIOL 1610 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, Social Science Composite Teaching, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3712. Human Learning & Memory. 3 Hours.

Explores the theoretical and experimental analysis of learning and memory. Emphasis on historical concepts of learning and memory systems, encoding and retrieval processes as well as mechanisms of forgetting. Prerequisite: PSY 2000 (Grade C or higher).

PSY 3720. Psychopharmacology. 3 Hours.

Focuses on how the chemical functions of the brain, examining how behavior and environment can change brain functions, and how medications and drugs alter those functions. Includes a basic survey of neuropharmacology, the effects of various psychotropic drugs, and the actions of drugs used to treat mental disorders. Principles covered include neurophysiological mechanisms involved in synaptic activity, distribution of specific neurotransmitter systems, and actions of specific drugs and their effects on behavior, mood, and thought processes. Prerequisite: PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3710 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA (odd).

PSY 4000. History of Psychology. 3 Hours.

Required of Psychology majors. An examination of the philosophical issues that have troubled psychology as a science, such as determinism and free will, conscious and unconscious processed, the possibility and efficacy of self-knowledge, behaviorism vs. mentalism, and the relation of mind and brain. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 (Grade C or higher), AND completed at least 75 credit hours, AND Psychology major or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology; OR instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 4010. Intro to Program Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Designed to provide an overview of the program evaluation process; topics include an examination of models, theory, and techniques used in program evaluation. Content includes experimental design, qualitative approaches, cost analysis, public program evaluation, and ethics. Prerequisites PSY 3000 AND PSY 3010 or equivalent (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. Offered upon sufficient student need.

PSY 4120. Testing and Measurement. 3 Hours.

Survey of methods, techniques, and instruments for measuring individual differences in behavior, a critical analysis of representative tests, values and limitations of test, methods of test selection. Evaluation, interpretation, and uses of standardized tests of aptitude, intelligence, achievement, and personality. Prerequisites: PSY 3010. FA (odd).

PSY 4130. Interpersonal Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Biological/Cognitive Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Introduction to theoretical perspective in interpersonal neuroscience employed in developmental psychology and in the study of interpersonal experiences. This course will also explore the neural mechanisms of emotion, personality and mood as they relate to interpersonal interaction. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 or BIO 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA.

PSY 4140. Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Biological/Cognitive Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Cognitive neuroscience uses neuroimaging techniques such as PET and fMRI to examine issues related to the mind/brain. This course covers such topics as perception and encoding, cerebral lateralization and specialization, the control of action, executive function, and the problem of consciousness. Completion of PSY 3120 is recommended before enrolling in this course. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA (odd).

PSY 4145. Cognitive Neuroscience of Attention. 3 Hours.

Utilizing behavioral and biological techniques, including neuroimaging, genetics and single-cell neural recordings, students will develop an understanding of the mechanisms, development and effects of attention and be able to apply this understanding to a variety of human populations and situations. Students are recommended to take PSY 2000 before taking this course, but it is not required. Prerequisites: PSY 3120, PSY 4140, OR PSY 4150 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies major with Psychology or Biology emphasis; or instructor permission.

PSY 4150. Sensation & Perception. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Biological/Cognitive Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. The anatomical and physiological bases of sensation will be reviewed. Moreover, traditional and contemporary theories of perception will be critically considered. How we see, hear, feel pain and temperature, and in general receive information from the environment; how our perceptions are affected by expectancy, knowledge, and higher-level organizational factors. Students will be expected to master basic concepts of sensory and perceptual function. Prerequisite: PSY 2000 or BIO 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3120 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA (even).

PSY 4200. Psychology of Morality. 3 Hours.

Reviews recent and ongoing theory and research to explore how and why morality influences our judgments and actions with a specific emphasis on the relative roles of evolved emotions and of principled reasoning in moral processes. This course will incorporate evidence and argument from the fields of evolutionary biology, philosophy, anthropology, social neuroscience, and social psychology to explore the effects of moral thinking and feeling on topics such as economic and legal decision making, political affiliation, helping behavior, aggression and social deviance. Prerequisites: PSY 1010; AND PSY 2000 or BIO 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology majors, Biology majors, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; AND Advanced standing; or instructor permission. SP (even).

PSY 4300. Introduction to Counseling & Psychotherapy. 4 Hours.

Designed to familiarize students with theories of counseling and psychotherapy with an emphasis on the major models within the field. Theories will be critically evaluated, contrasted, and applied to a range of psychological problems and diverse populations. Students will also explore the historical background and developmental precipitants of each theory as well as the multicultural strengths and weaknesses of each counseling approach. Opportunity is provided to practice and refine counseling skills. Highly recommended for students interested in pursuing a counseling related profession. Combined lecture/lab. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 or BIO 3110; AND PSY 3400 (all grade C or higher); AND Advanced standing; AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 4350. Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy. 3 Hours.

Introduce students to the field of marriage and family therapy. This includes the history, theory, prominent clinicians, therapeutic topics and techniques. Survey and comparative analysis of modern and postmodern approaches to family will be included. Both the theory and procedures of each modality will be addressed. Prerequisite: PSY 1100 or FCS 1500 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology majors, Biology Majors, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology. FA (even).

PSY 4440. Addiction. 3 Hours.

Provides students with the opportunity to explore the many issues related to the various forms and processes of addiction, focusing on etiology, assessment, treatment, and legal issues with regard to addiction. Students will also have the opportunity to learn about social and community resources designed to aid recovery. Prerequisite: PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3400 or PSY 3460; (Grade C or higher) AND Psychology majors, Biology majors, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA.

PSY 4510. Industrial-Organizational Psychology. 3 Hours.

Examines current issues in industrial-organizational psychology, specifically the relationship between people and the world of work. Topics include the history and methodology of industrial-organizational psychology, employment process, job analysis, testing and selection, performance appraisals, training, work motivation, job satisfaction, leadership, organizational development, and job stress. Successful students will gain a working knowledge of classic and cutting-edge topics in this field. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. SP.

PSY 4520. Psychobiology. 3 Hours.

Psychobiology is a four credit senior-level course with a laboratory. Nerve cell conduction, neurotransmission, and neuroanatomy are investigated in the context of human cognition and behavior through lecture, discussion, neural simulation, and lab dissection. A research-based approach is used throughout the course, and students complete research projects in lab using neural simulation software. Ethical issues in brain research are integrated into discussions when relevant. Prerequisites: PSY 3710 OR BIOL 2420 (either Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3000 OR BIOL 3150 (either Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies major with Psychology or Biology emphasis. Corequisite(s): PSY 4525 or BIOL 4525. FA (even).

PSY 4525. Psychobiology Lab. 1 Hour.

Lab portion of PSY 4520/BIOL 4520. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: PSY 3710 OR BIOL 2420 (either Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3000 OR BIOL 3150 (either Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies major with Psychology or Biology emphasis. Corequisites: PSY 4520 or BIOL 4520. FA (even).

PSY 4800R. Directed Research I. 1-3 Hours.

Students will work on a specific research project under the direction of a faculty member. Student involvement will depend on the student's preparation and interest. Completion of the course will require a paper (using supporting scientific sources, in APA style) related to the research problem. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 4801R. Directed Research II. 1-3 Hours.

Students will work on a specific research project under the direction of a faculty member. Student involvement will depend on the student's preparation and interest. Completion of the course will require a paper (using supporting scientific sources, in APA style) related to the research problem. Prerequisite: PSY 4800R (Grade C or higher), and Instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 4802R. Directed Research III. 1-3 Hours.

Students will work on a specific research project under the direction of a faculty member. Student involvement will depend on the student's preparation and interest. Completion of the course will require a paper (using supporting scientific sources, in APA style) related to the research problem. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 4810R. Internships and Field Experience. 1-3 Hours.

Application of psychological principles in community settings with supervision by faculty member and qualified personnel at cooperating agencies. Requires a contract agreed upon by student, agency supervisor, and faculty sponsor. FA, SP.

PSY 4860R. Psychology Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Students work in local or regional agencies or institutions by observing or participating in professional activities under appropriate supervision. Repeatable up to 9 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP, SU.

PSY 4910. Capstone Research in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Psychology Capstone requirement. Requires consolidation of information, skills, and knowledge learned throughout students' undergraduate studies, particularly in the Psychology Core and research areas, to conduct independent research to further develop their understanding of Psychology as a science. Course fee required. Prerequisite: PSY 3010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology Major; AND Senior standing. FA, SP.

PSY 4920. Capstone Seminar in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Psychology Capstone requirement. Requires that students write an APA-style review paper about an area of Psychology in which they have an occupational interest, engage in a collaborative research project, and create a professional planning portfolio containing the documents necessary for them to enter the workforce or gain admittance to graduate school. Prerequisite: PSY 3010 (Grade C or higher); Psychology major; and Senior standing. FA, SP.

PSY 4990R. Psychology Seminar: Advanced Topics. 3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in Psychology. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. Grades will be based on student papers and/or exams. Active participation in class discussions may also contribute toward a student's grade. The specific topic of this course will be approved by the department chair and will comply with university policy regarding the course credit offered. This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Instructor permission may be required at the request of the instructor. Prerequisites: Psychology major OR Integrated Studies major with Psychology emphasis; AND Senior standing; OR instructor permission.

Social Work Courses

SW 1010. Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the history and development of professional social work including basic principles and values, areas of practice, and work opportunities, including examination of the theoretical foundations for work with organizations, groups, and individuals, with an emphasis on each student's exploration of the values and belief systems that would affect their practice in the field. FA.

SW 2300. Social Work as an Institution. 3 Hours.

Introductory course providing undergraduate students with a framework for understanding the social welfare system in the United States and identifying major social problems facing contemporary American society such as poverty, racism and discrimination, child abuse, domestic violence, chronic illness, mental illness, substance abuse, crime and delinquency, unemployment and homelessness and provision for the aged. Focuses on how public and private social-service agencies attempt to address these social problems. Students are asked to explore their own values and beliefs about the provision of social services to disadvantaged populations. Intended to help students explore their interests and aptitudes for careers in social work. FA.

Sociology Courses

SOC 1010. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social & Behavioral Sciences General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Teaches what sociology is, what a sociologist does, and how sociology is applied, including the study of cultures, socialization, stratification, religion, families, organizations and social change through lectures, guest speakers, film, writing assignments, and exams. FA, SP, SU.

SOC 1020. Social Problems. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social & Behavioral Sciences General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Studies contemporary social issues dealing with crime, sexuality, drug abuse, violence, and families, in addition to larger social problems such as war, poverty, race and ethnic relations, population and the environment through lectures, guest speakers, film, writing assignments, and exams. FA, SP.

SOC 1200. Sociology of the Family. 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement. Teaches what sociology is and how sociology is applied to the study of families, covering many different aspects of including families through history, gender roles, love, sexuality, courtship, marriage, parenting, children, racial-ethnic families, families and work, family violence, separation and divorce, and aging in the family through lectures, guest speakers, film, writing assignments, and exams. Offered based on sufficient student need.

SOC 3010. Stratification and Inequality. 3 Hours.

Examines theories of and research concerning explanations of the causes of social, economic, and political stratification and inequality, including consequences of inequality for individuals and groups. This course will examine the roles of race, gender and class in systems of stratification and inequality. Prerequisite: SOC1010 (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

SOC 3020. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Open to all students. Course covers sociological social psychological perspectives such as phenomenology, exchange, rational choice, dramaturgy, ethnomethodology, and symbolic interactionism. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher). FA.

SOC 3041. Sociology of Rock Music. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the cultural and structural aspects of rock music as an art world. As such, it will examine the music as the ongoing creation of people in many parts of society: artists, engineers, club owners, audience members, and critics to name just a few. The course will also look at visual, lyrical, and musical codes that define and distinguish rock music from other genres of music. Historical and cross-cultural examples of rock will include studies from various time periods and countries as well as how race, class, and gender are integral to an understanding of this art form. SP (odd).

SOC 3111. Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Introduces the research methods and designs by which Sociologists father and analyze data, including the common research methods of interviews, surveys, and observation, among others. Prerequisite: SOC 1010. SP.

SOC 3112. Social Statistics. 3 Hours.

Students will learn to use and interpret statistical analysis. Includes descriptive statistics (i.e., frequency distributions, graphs, central tendency, variability), examination of relationship between variables (bivariate regression, correlation), and a discussion of inferential statistics (t-test, ANOVA, chi-square). Prerequisites: SOC 1010 AND MATH 1040 (both Grade C or higher). SP.

SOC 3113. Survey Research and Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

Survey Research is designed to prepare students to understand, conduct, and analyze surveys and present the findings. This course will be particularly useful to assist students who are considering, planning or currently working on research projects with a survey component. Upon the completion of the course, students should be able to decide whether and when surveys are appropriate means of data collection, have a good idea of how to put together a survey, conduct basic quantitative analysis of survey data, and report the findings. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher). SP.

SOC 3114. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the many types of qualitative research methods within sociology. Students will learn about and actively administer field work and interview techniques among other types of methods. The collection, analysis, and interpretation of gathered data will be emphasized. Course offered in rotation. Consult class schedule. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher).

SOC 3140. Sociological Theory. 3 Hours.

Examines the variety of perspectives and theories unique to Sociology as a discipline which provide differing perspectives of social structure, culture, and interaction. Prerequisite: SOC 1010. FA.

SOC 3370. Gender in Contemporary Society. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social & Behavioral Sciences General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Introduction to the core sociological concepts of gender in contemporary society. It explores what sociologists mean by the concept of gender and how they observe and measure it. Furthermore, it gives students an understanding of the centrality of gender to the sociologist's perspective of social life; as well as underscoring the ways gender can be maintained and can also be organically and forcefully changed within society and the interactive effects they have on peoples' lives. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher).

SOC 3435. Globalization. 3 Hours.

Examines and critiques the historical origins, economic and technological foundations, institutional arrangements, ideological underpinnings, collective movements, and controversial outcomes of 'transnationalism', and 'globalization.' Sociological analysis emphasizes macro-level institutions that shape globalization and social conflicts arising from its effects. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher). FA (odd).

SOC 3550. Organizations in Society. 3 Hours.

Examines the culture and structure of formal organizations: organizational forms; bureaucracies; coordination of work; organizational control, autonomy and control, culture, conflict, diversity, and change. Sociological theories about modern organizations and the impact of new technologies will be examined. Prerequisite: SOC 1010. FA.

SOC 3560. Deviance and Social Control. 3 Hours.

Introduces the various perspectives and theories dealing with deviance and social control, including an examination of the ways in which people perceive and deal with what are seen as cultural norms. Prerequisite: SOC 1010. SP.

SOC 3630. Sociology of Racial & Ethnic Relations. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social and Behavioral Sciences General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Introduces students to the core sociological concepts of race and ethnic relations in contemporary society. Explores what sociologists mean by the concept of multiculturalism and how they observe and measure it. Furthermore, it gives students an understanding of the centrality of race and ethnicity to the sociologist's perspective of social life; as well as underscoring the ways minority status can be maintained and can also be organically and forcefully changed within society and the interactive effects they have on peoples' lives. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher).

SOC 4910. Senior Capstone. 3 Hours.

This course fulfills the Sociology capstone requirement to earn a BA/BS degree. In this course, students will undertake a well-defined research project involving primary and/or secondary data analysis. The final product for the capstone will be a paper of "publishable quality" combined with an end-of-semester presentation. Prerequisites: SOC 1010, SOC 3111, SOC 3112, SOC 3140 (all Grade C or higher), and Senior standing. SP.

Faculty

Department Chair

Robert Carlson, Ph.D.

Professors

Matt Smith-Lahrman, Ph.D.

Associate Professors

Robert Carlson, Ph.D.

John Jones, Ph.D.

Dannelle Larsen-Rife, Ph.D.

Assistant Professors

Gary Cantrell, Ph.D.

Christine Chew, Ph.D.

Lish Harris, Ph.D.

R. C. Morris, Ph.D.

Kristine Olson, Ph.D.

John Pugliese, Ph.D.

Ed Wu, Ph.D.

I-Shan Yang, Ph.D.

Instructors

Palwasha Ahad, Ph.D.

Steven Child, MSW

Michael Tatum, Ed.D.

Joan Runs Through, M.S.

Advisors

Aaron Combs, M.S.

Craig Demke