American Sign Language (ASL)

ASL 1010. Beginning American Sign Language I (ALCI). 4 Hours.

For beginning students interested in American Sign Language. Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Emphasizes principles, methods, and techniques of communicating manually with deaf individuals. Teaches basic receptive and expressive skills, overviews basic grammatical structure in signing, and explores deaf culture. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including drills, videos, and work in pairs. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts degree or Bachelor of Arts degree for some majors. Successful completers are prepared to take ASL 1020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. This course is designated as an Active Learning Cultural Immersion (ALCI) course. Students have a unique opportunity to learn another culture as part of the learning objectives of this course. This course requires purchase of software, see instructor for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate proficiency in one-to-one conversation and share basic information related to specific instructor-led common topics. 2. Demonstrate comprehension of messages in one-to-one conversation and through electronic means. 3. Express oneself in one-to-one conversations and through electronic means. 4. Identify the beliefs, values, and attitudes within Deaf culture. 5. Demonstrate proficiency in one-to-one conversation using basic grammatical structures of ASL, including topicalization, contrastive structure, ranking and narration. 6. Identify basic products related to Deaf culture and used by Deaf people. FA, SP.

ASL 1020. Beginning American Sign Language II (FL, ALCI). 4 Hours.

For students interested in American Sign Language who have completed ASL 1010 or who have equivalent experience (approximately two years of high school ASL). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Emphasizes principles, methods, and techniques of communicating manually with deaf individuals. Continues the development of basic conversational skills with emphasis on the receptive skills, grammatical features, vocabulary development, and cultural awareness. Varied methods are used to teach the class, including drills, videos, and work in pairs. Students using 1020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for ASL 1010 upon passing 1020 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts degree or Bachelor of Arts degree for some majors. Successful completers are prepared to take ASL 2010. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. This course is designated as an Active Learning Cultural Immersion (ALCI) course. Students have a unique opportunity to learn another culture as part of the learning objectives of this course. This course requires purchase of software, see instructor for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate proficiency in conversations in small groups with the teacher and classmates on common topics.2. Demonstrate comprehension of messages in small groups and through electronic means.3. Express oneself in small groups and through electronic means.4. Compare and analyze beliefs, values, and attitudes reflected in products found in Deaf culture and other cultures.5. Compare and analyze beliefs, values, and attitudes within Deaf culture. Prerequisite: ASL 1010 or instructor permission. FA, SP.

ASL 1500. Introduction to Deaf Culture. 3 Hours.

For students interested in understanding Deaf culture. Focuses on the historical events that impact members of the Deaf Community. Explores American Sign Language and its unique place in Deaf culture. Also addresses the diversity and cultural identity of members of the Deaf community in America. Includes lecture, community experiences and basic comparison between Deaf culture and the student's own culture. Course is taught in or interpreted into spoken English. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Illustrate understanding in one-to-one conversation to discuss viewpoints of Deaf people. 2. Demonstrate understanding in one-to-one conversation comparing Deaf culture with one's own and other cultures. 3. Demonstrate understanding in written format comparing Deaf culture with one's own culture. 4. Demonstrate understanding of how members of the Deaf community share certain commonalities which include specific places, behaviors, experiences and activities. 5. Describe examples of behaviors common to members of the Deaf community. FA.

ASL 2000. Fingerspelling and Numbers in American Sign Language. 2 Hours.

Focuses on the complex patterns and linguistic rules governing the use of fingerspelling and numbering. Students will practice their receptive and expressive skills that are required to be skilled communicators and effective American Sign Language Interpreters. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including lecture, videos, guest lecturers, practice interpreting sessions and recording videos for self-evaluation of signing skills. This course requires purchase of software, see instructor for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe and use lexicalized terms in ASL. 2. Express the linguistic rules governing the use of fingerspelling. 3. Produce interpretation of fingerspelled words clearly and accurately. 4. Express the linguistic rules governing the use of numbers in ASL including cardinal, ordinal, age, money and time. 5. Express the rule of nine in ASL. Prerequisite: ASL 1020. FA.

ASL 2010. Intermediate American Sign Language I (ALCI). 4 Hours.

For intermediate-level students who have taken ASL 1020, or for students with equivalent experience (four or more years of high school ASL). Native-speakers and students who have acquired proficiency in this language through extended residence, military service, church missions, or other methods may not enroll in this class. Continued emphasis on communicative competence, including both expressive and receptive abilities, as well as cultural awareness. Students using 2010 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2010 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts degree or Bachelor of Arts degree for some majors. Successful completers are prepared to take ASL 2020. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. This course is designated as an Active Learning Cultural Immersion (ALCI) course. Students have a unique opportunity to learn another culture as part of the learning objectives of this course. This course requires purchase of software, see instructor for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate proficiency in group conversation and exchange information and opinions on a variety of topics. 2. Demonstrate comprehension of messages in larger groups and through electronic means. 3. Express oneself in front of a larger group and through electronic means. 4. Demonstrate proficiency in appropriate social interactions using appropriate products that are acceptable in Deaf Culture. 5. Demonstrate proficiency in appropriate social interactions that are acceptable within Deaf culture. Prerequisite: ASL 1020 or instructor permission. FA.

ASL 2020. Intermediate American Sign Language II (ALCI). 4 Hours.

For intermediate-level students who have taken ASL 2010. Continued emphasis on communicative competence, including both expressive and receptive abilities, as well cultural awareness. Students using 2020 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level classes upon passing 2020 with a C grade or higher. This course partially qualifies students to receive an Associate of Arts degree or Bachelor of Arts degree for some majors. Placement in foreign language classes is at the discretion of the Department Chair. This course is designated as an Active Learning Cultural Immersion (ALCI) course. Students have a unique opportunity to learn another culture as part of the learning objectives of this course. This course requires purchase of software, see instructor for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Defend and exchange information and opinions on topics of students choosing in one-to-one and group settings both inside and outside of classroom. 2. Demonstrate comprehension of messages inside and outside of classroom and through electronic means. 3. Express oneself in front of an audience both inside and outside of classroom and through electronic means. 4. Defend and exchange information and opinions on topics of Deaf culture-related products and compare it to other cultures in one-to-one and group settings both inside and outside of the classroom. 5. Debate and exchange information and opinions on the impact of Deaf cultural norms on members of the Deaf community in one-to-one and group setting both inside and outside of the classroom. Prerequisite: ASL 2010 or instructor permission. SP.

ASL 2300. Introduction to Interpreting. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the process of interpreting spoken English to American Sign Language and American Sign Language to spoken English. Course allows students to become familiar with the profession of interpreting including; legislation, history, ethics, terminology, and the variety of professional workplaces and the certification process. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including lecture, videos, guest lecturers, practice interpreting sessions and recording videos for self-evaluation of signing skills. This course is a prerequisite for advanced interpreting courses required for an American Sign Language Interpreting Emphasis. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate the various laws that regulate the interpreting profession in Utah. 2. Describe the history of the interpreting profession. 3. Analyze the Code of Professional Conduct that applies to the interpreting profession. 4. Express the unique terminology associated with the interpreting profession. 5. Explain the various workplaces for interpreters. 6. Explain the Utah Certification process. 7. Explain the National Certification process. SP.

ASL 3060. Advanced American Sign Language I. 3 Hours.

Builds on skills learned in Beginning and Intermediate American Sign Language. Students will practice conversational skills and increase their understanding of the grammar of ASL including the use of space, facial grammar, semantics and syntactical structure. This course is taught in ASL and is designed for students who have demonstrated competency through former coursework, missionary service, or students who are native-users (CODAs). Students using ASL 3060 as an entry level class may receive vertical credits for lower level courses upon passing ASL 3060 with a grade of C or higher. Placement in Advanced American Sign Language classes require a screening for competency and skills. Placement is at the discretion of the Department Chair. This course requires purchase of software, see instructor for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Produce interpretations of source language into accurate target Language. 2. Analyze native source language for grammatical structure and apply those grammatical structures in a spontaneous conversation in the source language.3. Evaluate the accuracy of interpretation of target language of self and peers.4. Modify evaluations of target language to improve and recreate more accurate interpretations of source language. 5. Produce correct language interactions with members of the Deaf community. Prerequisite: ASL 2020 (Grade C or higher). FA.

ASL 3070. Advanced American Sign Language II. 3 Hours.

Builds on skills learned in Advanced American Sign Language (ASL). Students will build their skills in conversational, grammatical and syntactical aspects of ASL. This course requires students to be actively involved in events of the Deaf community. This course is taught in ASL. Placement in Advanced American Sign Language classes requires a screening for competency and skills. Placement is at the discretion of the Department Chair. This course requires purchase of software, see instructor for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Produce interpretations of source language into accurate target Language. 2. Analyze native source language for grammatical structure and apply those grammatical structures in a spontaneous conversation in the source language.3. Evaluate the accuracy of interpretation of target language of self and peers.4. Modify evaluations of target language to improve and recreate more accurate interpretations of source language. 5. Produce correct language interactions with members of the Deaf community. Prerequisite: ASL 3060 (Grade C or higher). FA.

ASL 3300. Current Trends in Interpreting (ALPP). 3 Hours.

This course increases the focus on the process of interpreting spoken English to American Sign Language and American Sign Language to spoken English. Instruction focuses on the various types of interpreting including education, mental health, medical, legal, video relay and remote video interpreting. Students will explore the history of the interpreting profession and discover the processes and requirements of becoming a certified interpreter. Students will discover ways that they can provide cultural mediation in an interpreting situation. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including lecture, videos, guest lecturers, practice interpreting sessions and recording videos for self-evaluation of signing skills. This course is designated as an Active Learning Professional Practice (ALPP) course. This course allows students to explore and apply content learned in the course in a professional experience away from the classroom. This course requires purchase of software, see instructor for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze the patterns of interpreting from Spoken English to American Sign Language and from ASL to spoken English. 2. Apply the unique terminology associated with the interpreting profession. 3. Analyze the similarities and differences between interpreting in educational, medical, community, video relay and remote video interpreting settings. 4. Explain the important historical events in the development of the interpreting profession. 5. Describe the process required to earn a Utah Novice, Utah Professional and national certification in interpreting. 6. Devise cultural mediation during an interpreting assignment. Prerequisite: ASL 2300. SP.

ASL 3400. American Sign Language Linguistics. 3 Hours.

This course provides the foundation for concepts presented in ASL 3010 and ASL 3020. Course focuses on linguistic and grammatical structures of ASL including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the complexities of ASL and evaluate and improve their linguistic and grammatical skills. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate the ability to communicate in ASL using appropriate grammatical features. 2. Articulate communication errors due to the misuse of grammatical features. 3. Evaluate their own use of handshape, palm orientation, location, movement and non-manual signals. 4. Develop corrections to their own sign productions. 5. Compose modifications of signs to include time and adverbial content. Prerequisite: ASL 2020 and acceptance to the ASL/ENG Interpreter Training Program. FA.

ASL 3500. Deaf History. 3 Hours.

This course explores the history of Deaf people in the United States. Students will examine the foundations of Deaf education, the rise of oralism, and trials that members of the Deaf Community have experienced. Students will explore the Deaf President Now Movement, various laws impacting the lives of Deaf people and the efforts that members of the Deaf Community have made to combat Audism. This course is taught in ASL. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate the effort that members of the Deaf Community have undergone to provide equity for services and recognition of culture. 2. Describe the creation, difficulties and successes of Deaf schools. 3. Analyze the impact of the Deaf President Now Movement. 4. Describe the effects of and propose ways to combat Audism. 5. Appraise the value of various technological advances that impact members of the Deaf Community. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the ASL Interpreting Program. SP.

ASL 3600. American Sign Language Literature. 3 Hours.

This course explores ASL Literature including ABC Stories, Number Stories, Classifier Stories, Handshape stories, Narratives and ASL Poetry. Students will discover various artists/performers involved in creating and disseminating ASL literature. Students will examine De'VIA and its place in American Deaf Culture. Students will create and evaluate their own ASL literature. This course is taught in ASL. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Assess the genres of ASL literature including ABC Stories, Number stories, Classifier stories, Handshape stories, Narratives and ASL Poetry. 2. Identify the creators of ASL Literature. 3. Analyze the various performers of the genres of ASL literature including ABC Stories, Number stories, Classifier stories, Handshape stories, Narratives and ASL Poetry. 4. Create ABC Stories, Number stories, Classifier stories, Handshape stories, Narratives and ASL Poetry. 5. Appraise their own creation and the work of others based on ASL Literature. Prerequisite: ASL 2020 (Grade C or higher). SP.

ASL 3990. Seminar in American Sign Language. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable-credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit hour offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other non-traditional instruction methods. Note that this course is an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. This course is repeatable up to 12 credits as long as the topic of the course is different each time. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Adapt their use of American Sign Language and culture depending on interests or context. 2. Integrate their knowledge of American Sign Language and culture of members of the Deaf community to actively participate in events or organizations. 3. Compose appropriate interpretations based on the need of consumers. Prerequisites: Instructor permission.

ASL 4300. Transliterating. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the challenges of transliterating between spoken English and manually coded English sign systems. Students will be able to recognize varieties of manually coded English sign systems and internalize strategies to match consumer language use and meaning. Students will learn the developmental theories behind manually coded sign systems. This course will prepare students to apply specific components on state quality assurance exams for American Sign Language Interpreters. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate comprehension of the various manually coded sign systems. 2. Demonstrate the ability to produce manually coded signed English. 3. Describe the theories behind the development of manually coded sign systems. 4. Demonstrate strategies to match consumer language use and meaning. 5. Employ corrections to their own sign productions. Prerequisites: ASL 3060 and acceptance to the ASL/ENG Interpreter Training Program. FA.

ASL 4350. Advanced Interpreting (ALPP). 3 Hours.

This course applies the knowledge gained in previous courses to the process of interpreting spoken English to American Sign Language and American Sign Language to spoken English. Instruction focuses on the profession and skills required to be an interpreter in a variety of settings. Students will participate in various interpreting scenarios. Participants will be expected to record their interpreting scenarios and participate in critiques of their own and other ASL interpreter's skills. Students will identify patterns of errors and apply techniques for repairing the interpreted messages. A variety of teaching methods are employed, including lecture, videos, guest lecturers, practice interpreting sessions and recording videos for self-evaluation of signing skills. This course is designated as an Active Learning Professional Practice (ALPP) course. This course allows students to explore and apply content learned in the course in a professional experience away from the classroom. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate the patterns of interpreting from spoken English to American Sign Language and from American Sign Language to spoken English. 2. Contrast the similarities and differences between interpreting in educational, medical, community, video relay and remote video interpreting settings. 3. Develop interpreting skills for a variety of different settings. 4. Critique their own interpreting skills and the skills of others to discover where communication break-downs occur. 5. Develop strategies to improve communication in areas where break-downs have occurred. 6. Critique errors in their own interpreted messages. 7. Develop techniques for repairing interpreter errors. Prerequisites: ASL 2300 and a Utah Interpreter Provisional Permit and acceptance to the ASL/ENG Interpreter Training Program. SP.

ASL 4400. Topics in Interpreting. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the interpreting process with individuals who may require special attention such as individuals who are deaf/blind or have other considerations such as Cerebral Palsy or Usher's Syndrome. This course also prepares students to work with Certified Deaf Interpreters (CDIs), to work with an interpreter team, and to adjust their interpreter product based on feedback from participants. This course is taught in ASL. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate the changes necessary for providing a quality interpretation for a deaf/blind individual. 2. Demonstrate the changes necessary for providing a quality interpretation for a deaf individual who also has other requirements based on issues such as Cerebral Palsy or Usher's Syndrome. 3. Facilitate working with Certified Deaf Interpreters. 4. Facilitate working in teaming situations. 5. Modify their interpreting process based on feedback from participants. Prerequisites: ASL 3300 (Grade C or higher) and ASL 4700 (Grade C or higher) and Acceptance into the ASL Interpreting Program. FA.

ASL 4500. Advanced Deaf Culture. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on specific historical events that have contributed to the formation of the Deaf community. Students will explore how members of the Deaf community identify with their ethnic, cultural and linguistic characteristics. Students will explain how audism and oppression have impacted members of the Deaf community and how legislation and regulations have contributed both positively and negatively to events in the Deaf community. This course includes lecture, community experiences and basic comparison between Deaf culture and the student's own culture. This course is taught in American Sign Language. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Express the impact of the 1880's Conference of Milan on members of the Deaf community. 2. Express the impact of specific legislation on education of Deaf students and members of the Deaf community. 3. Compare how members of the Deaf community share certain cultural commonalities which include education, specific places, behaviors, experiences and activities. 4. Appraise specific instances of Audism and various ways that members of the Deaf community combat Audism and oppression. 5. Evaluate the uses of specific cultural artifacts common to members of the Deaf community. Prerequisite: ASL 1500 and ASL 2020. SP.

ASL 4700. Ethics of Interpreting. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the ethical aspects of medical, educational, legal, mental health, Video Relay, Video Remote and other interpreting situations. Students will understand the tenets of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Code of Professional Conduct. Students will study a variety of interpreting situations and discuss the specific ethical issues involved in the given scenarios. Students will use the Demand/Control Schema to consider all of the ethical choices that can be made in routine interpreting scenarios. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Enumerate each of the seven tenets of the Code of Professional Conduct. 2. Compose situations where the Code of Professional Conduct will apply. 3. Compile individual scenarios frequently found in Interpreting situations and be able to apply the Code of Professional Conduct to each given scenario. 4. Analyze cooperatively with other students to discuss possible ethical violations and the appropriate way to effectively remedy the given violations. 5. Integrate Demand/Control Schema to make ethical decisions. Prerequisite: ASL 3300. SP.