Criminal Justice (CJ)

Courses

CJ 1010. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, law, private or industrial security, counseling, or criminology, and persons interested in the functioning of the U. S. criminal justice system. Examines the criminal justice system, police, courts, corrections, and related government functions and agencies. Identifies and explores problems, issues and trends in criminal justice. Uses a variety of teaching methods, including lecture, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. This course is required for the associate's degree in Criminal Justice and prepares students for bachelor's degree work. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define the major components of the criminal justice system and the fundamental processes that take place therein. 2. Explain the vital role each branch plays in order for the criminal justice system as a whole to perform its proper function. 3. Identify the responsibilities and challenges faced by professionals working in the principle branches of the criminal justice system. 4. Discuss the process of the development, enforcement, reformation, and behavior of law. FA, SP.

CJ 1070. Special Function Officer Training (POST I). 6 Hours.

Restricted to students enrolled in Module I of the law enforcement academy program leading to State certification as a Special Function Officer. Counts as elective credit toward an AS or BS in criminal justice for completion of Module I of the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certification. Course work includes physical training, administration, certification, career orientation, criminal and traffic laws, and the proper means of enforcing them. Ethics and professionalism as well as police community relations are emphasized. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Develop a working knowledge of the concept of ethics and leadership as it relates to the law enforcement profession. 2. Express confidence in defensive tactics concepts and principles, performance under the effects of the sympathetic nervous system, essential officer behaviors, effective communication and decision making during high stress use of force. 3. Assess the medical condition of a victim, a fellow officer, or themselves if they become injured, and provide emergency care, including basic life support prior to the arrival of emergency medical services. 4. Describe the concepts of civil and criminal liability as they relate to law enforcement and the their performance. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

CJ 1080. Law Enforcement Training (POST II), Part I. 6 Hours.

Restricted to students enrolled in Module II of the law enforcement academy program leading to State Certification as a Law Enforcement Officer Training. Counts as elective credit towards an AS or BS in criminal justice for completion of Module II of the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certification. Course includes physical training, completes the first portion of the law enforcement training required by the state of Utah to become law enforcement officer certified. Emphasizes firearms, emergency vehicle operation, and arrest, control techniques. Prerequisite(s): CJ 1070 and instructor permission. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Simulate the basic concepts of emergency vehicle operations. 2. Integrates a competency for the safe handling and cleaning of firearms. 3. Prepare field notes and writing police reports. 4. Apply proper techniques for testifying in court. 5. Develop an understanding of the proper procedures for handling civil disputes and processing court documents. 6. Demonstrate knowledge of the provisions of Utah Traffic Law. 7. Demonstrate while defending themselves use of force decisions during a series of simulated offer encounters. Course fee required. SP.

CJ 1090. Law Enforcement Training (POST II), Part II. 7 Hours.

Restricted to students enrolled in Module II of the law enforcement academy program leading to State Certification as a Law Enforcement Officer Training. Counts as elective credit towards an AS or BS in criminal justice for completion of Module II of the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certification. Course includes physical training, completes the second portion of the law enforcement training required by the state of Utah to become law enforcement officer certified. Emphasizes firearms, emergency vehicle operation, and arrest, control techniques. Prerequisite(s): CJ 1080 and instructor permission. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Illustrate the types and methods of patrol operations. 2. Determine the difference between mental, physical, tactical, and firearms skills necessary for deploying as a first responder to high risk incidents. 3. Classify common components of explosive and incendiary devices. 4. Develop a competent understanding of laws and procedure related to handling child abuse or neglect situations. 5. Illustrate proper traffic accident investigations and report writing. 6. Distinguish between common types of drugs and the paraphernalia that are commonly found with various types of drugs. 7. Practice requirements to obtain Intoxilyzer certification. 8. Demonstrate the specific characteristics and basic principles of shooting a handgun. 9. Illustrate marksmanship and safety through practice on a firearms range. Course fee required. SU.

CJ 1300. Intro to Corrections. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, law, or criminology. Examines corrections philosophy, history, punishment of offenders, and rehabilitation. Also identifies problems, issues and trends in the corrections system. Uses lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. Develops a foundation for a career in corrections or law enforcement. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define the major components of the penal system and the fundamental processes that take place therein. 2. Describe the various facets of the system of corrections in the United States. 3. Identify the responsibilities and challenges faced by professionals working in corrections. 4. Compare and contrast varying correctional techniques. Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 (can be concurrently enrolled) or ENGL 1010A (can be concurrently enrolled) or ENGL 1010D (can be concurrently enrolled); and CJ 1010. FA.

CJ 1330. Criminal Law. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement; adult or juvenile corrections; law, private or industrial security; or criminology, as well as those who may desire to learn about criminal law in society. Provides a foundational understanding of criminal law, including crimes and defenses, as well as the historical foundation, limits, purposes, and functions of criminal law, using lectures, videos, guest lecturers, and assigned text study. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define the major components of the judicial system and the fundamental processes that take place therein. 2. Explain the various facets of the system of criminal law in the United States. 3. Identify the responsibilities and challenges faced by professionals working in criminal law. 4. Discuss various key statutes of criminal law. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010, or ENGL 1010A, or ENGL 1010D (all Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 1340. Criminal Investigation. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, or law. Includes interviewing witnesses and suspects; techniques in the collection and preservation of evidence; crime scene processing, including some post-crime scene processing of evidence; follow-up investigation and recent techniques of enhancing the criminal investigation function. Also provides an opportunity for in depth examination of the investigation needs of certain crimes using lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the responsibilities and challenges faced by professionals working in criminal investigations. 2. Compare and contrast varying investigational techniques. 3. Apply investigative techniques to real or imagined crimes. 4. Enhance and further their critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010, or ENGL 1010A, or ENGL 1010D (all Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 1390. Police Field Operations. 3 Hours.

Provides students with the knowledge needed by patrol and field officers, including an understanding of report writing as well as officer field note taking. Covers interviewing witnesses, search, seizure, arrest, and custody. Course covers Tennessee v. Gardner and the use of force doctrine and how it applies in field operations. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the responsibilities and challenges faced by professionals working in law enforcement. 2. Compare and contrast varying law enforcement strategies and techniques. 3. Apply police field operations to real or imagined scenarios. 4. Discuss the effectiveness of various strategies and techniques used by law enforcement. Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 (can be concurrently enrolled), or ENGL 1010A (can be concurrently enrolled), or ENGL 1010D (can be concurrently enrolled), and CJ 1010.

CJ 1900. Introduction to Computer Related Crime. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course for those students interested in learning about criminal investigations through digital forensics. Introduces computer crime through an overview of the criminal acts that can be committed using a computer or the Internet, and how those acts can be successfully investigated. Also includes the legal aspects of search and seizure, proper procedures for handling digital evidence in relation to the rules of evidence, and the use of basic imaging equipment. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe all 4 phases of digital forensics and identify 2 distinct tasks in each phase. 2. Demonstrate the ability to trace emails back to their source given their header. 3. Demonstrate proficiency using a hardware imager. 4. Process a virtual or created crime scene. Course fee required. FA, SP.

CJ 2020. Criminal Justice Supervision. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, or law. Covers principles of supervision, including motivation, discipline, evaluation, scheduling, work assignments, stress management and functioning of line and staff, using lectures, videos, guest lecturers, practical problem solving, and text study. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the various principles of supervision as well as the solutions and processes used in supervision. 2. Evaluate the effectiveness of supervision solutions and processes. 3. Describe the effects that different supervision solutions and processes have on the offender, offender's loved ones, and the larger community. 4. Analyze the effects that different supervision solutions and processes have on the offender, offender's loved ones, and the larger community. Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 (Grade C or higher), or ENGL 1010A (Grade C or higher), or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher), AND CJ 1010.

CJ 2330. Juvenile Justice. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, law, criminology, school counseling, or teaching. Examines the origin, philosophy and development of the juvenile justice system, juvenile court, relationship of various segments of the juvenile justice system and also examines theories of juvenile criminality and trends in treatment. Uses lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. Provides a foundation for work with juveniles. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe the major theories of delinquency. 2. Describe the origin, philosophy, and development of the juvenile justice system. 3. Compare and contrast adult and juvenile justice systems. 4. Assess the effectiveness of various processes of the juvenile justice system. Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 1010A (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher), and CJ 1010.

CJ 2350. Laws of Evidence. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, law, or criminology. Deals with the principles and rules of law emphasizing evidentiary problems related to criminal cases. Uses lectures, videos, guest lecturers and assigned text study. Provides a foundation for work in the criminal justice field or for students intending to attend the law enforcement or corrections academy. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the various principles and rules of law emphasizing evidentiary issues related to criminal justice. 2. Apply evidentiary law to real-world hypothetical cases. 3. Assess the utility and constitutionality of various laws of evidence. Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 1010A (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher), and CJ 1010. FA, SP.

CJ 2360. Juvenile Law & Procedure. 3 Hours.

Covers the causes and treatments of juvenile delinquency, including both conventional and non-conventional theoretical perspectives and solutions to the juvenile crime problem. Specific topics include: the nature of delinquency, theories in delinquency, female delinquency, gang behavior, and institutional care. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe the nature and theories of delinquency and institutional care. 2. Describe law and procedure as they relate to juveniles. 3. Differentiate juvenile and adult laws and procedures. 4. Examine changes that have occurred in juvenile law and procedure in the past. 5. Assess the effectiveness and utility of current juvenile criminal law and procedure. Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 1010A (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher), AND CJ 1010.

CJ 2700. Introduction to Digital Forensics. 3 Hours.

Skills-based course introducing the digital forensics process, including evidence processing, preservation, analysis, and presentation. Also includes digital evidence basics, data recovery, and some cyber law issues. Requires 6 hours of lab work on a Windows based machine each week. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Provide the steps for search and seizure of digital evidence on computers, personal digital devices, and data storage devices. 2. Understand how the 1st and 4th amendments apply to the search and seizure of digital evidence. 3. Describe the basics behind digital media and digital storage. 4. Understand when digital evidence is admissible in a court of law and when it is not. 5. Explain the entire process of a digital evidence examination including seizure, imaging, analysis, and presentation. Course fee required. FA, SP.

CJ 3100. Profiling Deviant Behavior. 3 Hours.

An historical and theoretical exploration of deviant behavior specifically analyzing particular forms of deviant behavior such as murder and rape, among other crimes. These topics will be discussed using the criminal thinking approach, sociopathic and psychopathic behavior analysis, and life course perspectives. Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (all Grade C or higher); AND CJ 1010 or PSY 1010 (all Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 3200. Policing in U.S. Society. 3 Hours.

Explores law enforcement at the local, state, and federal levels, introducing the nature of policing, a history of policing in the United States, different types of law enforcement agencies, different roles of police in our society, how police respond to crime, problems in policing, and experiences of police officers. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the various facets of law enforcement in the United States. 2. Analyze the responsibilities and challenges faced by professionals working in law enforcement. 3. Compare and contrast varying law enforcement strategies and techniques. 4. Assess the effectiveness of various strategies and techniques used by law enforcement. 5. Enhance and further their critical thinking skills. Prerequisites: CJ 1010 AND ENGL 1010 (Grade C or higher).

CJ 3250. Private Security. 3 Hours.

Examines external and internal private security measures; confidential personnel investigations and interview procedures. Studies principle and major concepts in prevention, protection, loss control and crime prevention in the commercial sector. Gives students a general overview of the role private security plays in modern society. The course will also introduce students to real-world concepts and applications and includes detailed coverage of everything from industry background and related law to premises, retails, business, employment, and information/computer security as well as surveillance, and even homeland security. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Examine external and internal private security measures; confidential personnel investigations and interview procedures. 2. Compare and contrast principle and major concepts in prevention, protection, loss control and crime prevention in the commercial sector. 3. Enhance and further their critical thinking skills. 4. Improve written and verbal communication skills.

CJ 3270. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Focuses on theories and research of crime causation, using a variety of criminological theories to analyze biological, psychological, and social factors that have been shown to contribute to criminal behavior. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Outline the major criminological theories that have been developed to describe the root causes of criminality. 2. Define the causal arguments outlined by these fundamental theories. 3. Compare and contrast varying theoretical frameworks. 4. Connect real, diverse facts to criminological theories. 5. Use criminological theory and crime trends to address criminal behavior within certain contexts. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

CJ 3300. Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes the practical application of basic research practices to tests of criminological theory as well as law enforcement and corrections problems. Students gain the knowledge necessary to interpret pertinent research in their area of interest. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Examine the link between theory and research. 2. Outline, describe, and apply various techniques of collecting, analyzing, and presenting data and research. 3. Further their inductive and deductive reasoning skills. 4. Improve written and verbal communication. Prerequisites: CJ 1010 (Grade C- or higher) AND ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C- or higher, or ACT score 28 or higher), AND MATH 1040 (Grade C- or higher). FA.

CJ 3310. Victimology. 3 Hours.

This course serves as an in-depth study into both scholarly and applied fields of victimology. Topics related to crime victimization typology, research methods, theoretical perspectives, and victims' experiences within the criminal justice system are discussed throughout the semester. Consult course schedule for rotation. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Exhibit adequate knowledge regarding victimology and any other topics outlined in the text and supplemental readings. 2. Apply victimological knowledge to real-life experiences. Prerequisites: CJ 3270 (Can be concurrently enrolled).

CJ 3320. Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

Examines procedural requirements for judicial processing of criminal offenders, including the rights of the accused, general court procedures, trial preparation, and principal constitutional law as applicable to criminal justice practitioners. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define the major components of the judicial system and the fundamental processes that take place therein. 2. List the various facets of criminal procedure in the United States. 3. Identify the responsibilities and challenges faced by professionals working in the judicial system. 4. Discuss various legal statutes that affect criminal procedure. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled).

CJ 3350. American Jails and Prisons. 3 Hours.

Examines the American penal system with particular emphasis on history, management, operations, focusing on the contemporary, adult prison with a particular emphasis upon contemporary problems, issues, and dilemmas. Diversity topics such as integration of the prison work force by women and minorities as well as the problems of elderly, women, and minority inmates will be examined. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze the major components of the penal system and the fundamental processes that take place therein. 2. Examine the strengths and weaknesses of the system of corrections in the United States. 3. Identify the responsibilities and challenges faced by professionals working in corrections. 4. Enhance and further their critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled).

CJ 3400. Drugs and Crime. 3 Hours.

Explains the international aspect of the growth, production and distribution of controlled dangerous substances, including the manufacture, cultivation, and distribution of controlled dangerous substances in the United States as well as strategies that have been used to combat the problem. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the various facets of drug policy in the United States. 2. Apply such knowledge to real-life experiences and occurrences. 3. Offer insightful critiques concerning the theory and practice of drug policy and enforcement in both the past and present. 4. Improve written and verbal communication skills. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled).

CJ 3450. Community Policing. 3 Hours.

This course examines key aspects of community-oriented policing and problem-solving policing. Particular emphasis is placed on the history and philosophy of community-policing, partnerships between police and the communities they serve, and problem-solving and crime prevention using current methods and tools. Consult course schedule for rotation. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Have knowledge of community oriented policing and problem-solving, especially the SARA problem-solving model. 2. Apply understanding of problem-solving to crime and disorder problems that police face. Prerequisites: CJ 3270 (Can be concurrently enrolled).

CJ 3500. White Collar Crime. 3 Hours.

Examines white collar crime, specifically exploring the definitions of white collar crime and how it is prosecuted. Describes the theories used to best understand participation in this type of criminal behavior. Addresses the punitive measures implemented in white collar cases and ethical issues surrounding these measures. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the various types of white collar crime. 2. Offer insightful critiques concerning the theory and practice of criminal justice intervention in instances of white collar crime. 3. Connect criminological theories to white collar crime. 4. Improve written and verbal communication skills. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled).

CJ 3550. Crime, Media, and Culture. 3 Hours.

This class concerns the representations of crime and the criminal justice system in the media. Television, film, news organizations, music, and electronic/internet media intersects with crime and the criminal justice system in a number of important ways. The point of this course is to examine how the media represents, distorts, and/or filters crime and justice issues. We will explore the impact the media has on public perceptions of crime and society, criminals, and the criminal justice system. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze the impact of media on the perception of crime. 2. Critique media sources coverage of crime regardless of students' own personal opinions. 3. Enhance and further their critical thinking skills. 4. Improve written and verbal communication skills. Prerequisites: CJ 3270 (Grade C- or higher) (can be concurrently enrolled).

CJ 3600. The Criminal-Life Course. 3 Hours.

Covers developmental trajectories of criminal behavior, beginning with the question, "what are the origins of delinquency?" Breaks into three sections: 1) The nature vs. nurture debate, 2) Investigates persistence and desistance of criminal behavior from childhood through adolescence (framed by the social psychological factors influencing crime), and 3) Examines criminal careers of people who persist in crime through adulthood. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Outline the life-course perspective of criminological theory. 2. Identify key aspects of development that affect participation in criminal behavior. 3. Apply such knowledge to real-life experiences and occurrences. 4. Improve written and verbal communication skills. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled).

CJ 3710. Crimes Against Humanity. 3 Hours.

A multi-disciplinary examination of the emergence and impact of modern conceptions of human rights. Examines institutions such as International War Tribunals and Peace and Reconciliation Commissions. Particular attention paid to the theories and causes of genocide. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define key behavioral and situational causes of participation in crimes against humanity. 2. Apply such knowledge to real-life experiences and occurrences. 3. Offer insightful critiques concerning the material covered in class. 4. Improve written and verbal communication skills. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled).

CJ 3830. International Criminal Justice Systems. 3 Hours.

Examines the influences of the history, religion, ethnicity, and traditions of other nations on the development of their respective legal systems. Examines the respective distinctions between other countries and compares them with the political practices and legal systems of the USA. Consult course schedule for rotation. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify how the 4 dominant legal systems were adopted by selected western and non-western countries and how that has shaped the development of their criminal justice system and response to crime. 2. Examine the historical, political and legal elements of a diverse group of international criminal justice systems. 3. Analyze the theoretical and methodological issues involved in the study of comparative international criminal justice systems. 4. Evaluate and apply knowledge of international system approaches to solve a contemporary criminal justice issue facing the United States. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (Grade C- or higher); can be concurrently enrolled.

CJ 4020. Urban Crime. 3 Hours.

Focuses on crime in the inner-city, the most crime-riddled areas in our country; examines urban crime typologies and their possible causes. Specifically, this course covers gang violence, the illegitimate economy of the inner-city, the policies designed to help combat the high crime rates of urban areas, and more. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the sociohistorical causes of modern inner-city communities. 2. Offer insightful critiques concerning the theory and practice of law and law enforcement in inner-city communities. 3. Connect criminological theories to crime in inner-city communities. 3. Enhance and further their critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: CJ 3270. FA.

CJ 4100. Social Control. 3 Hours.

Closely examines the mechanisms of social control, including formal means through the criminal justice system and informal means through familial and communal institutions. Covers punitive measures used in the criminal justice system, the behavioral influence of social control mechanisms, the ethics of policies of social control, and more. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe the various facets of social control. 2. Apply such knowledge to real-life experiences and occurrences. 3. Offer insightful critiques concerning the theory and practice of criminal justice mechanisms of control in both the past and present. 4. Improve written and verbal communication skills. Prerequisite: CJ 3270. FA.

CJ 4150. Criminal Justice Reform. 3 Hours.

Examines criminal justice reform. Topics may include bail, capital punishment, incarceration, juvenile justice, restorative justice, prisoner reentry, among others. Students will be introduced to potential reforms. Consult course schedule for rotation. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Examine various problems within the American criminal justice system. 2. Evaluate potential reforms within the criminal justice system. 3. Critique reforms to predict whether such efforts would be cost-effective/feasible to improve and resolve the many complicated dilemmas facing our criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (Grade C- or higher).

CJ 4200. Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

For students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, law, or criminology. Examines criminal justice system, police, courts, corrections, and related government functions and agencies, identifying and exploring ethical problems, issues, and trends. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and describe acceptable ethical conduct in the criminal justice field. 2. Extend their understanding of ethical conduct to real-life experiences in the criminal justice field. 3. Offer insightful critiques revolving around professional ethics to the actions and behaviors of criminal justice officials. 4. Improve verbal and written communication skills. Prerequisite: CJ 3270.

CJ 4240. Delinquency & Social Responsibility. 3 Hours.

Considers the statement: all crime is deviant but not all deviance is criminal. Breaks into three sections: 1. Reviews the origins, development, and reactions societies have to violations of codified law, 2. Considers what role a society plays in the creation and management of criminal behavior, and 3. Develops a plan for future laws and social policies designed to address criminal behavior. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify various causes of juvenile delinquency. 2. Analyze social responses to juvenile delinquency, especially those found in the criminal justice system. 3. Apply such knowledge to real-life experiences and occurrences. 4. Enhance and further their critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: CJ 3270. SP.

CJ 4260. The Criminology & Policy of Terrorism. 3 Hours.

Traces the history, causes and manifestations of terrorism, and reflects on the changes the 'War on Terrorism' has brought about for national and human security and for human rights. Also includes assessments of the responses to terrorism by domestic and international organizations, intelligence services and courts and trough diplomacy, criminal investigations, military action, etc. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe the various facets of terrorism policy in the United States. 2. Apply such knowledge to real-life experiences and occurrences. 3. Offer insightful critiques concerning the theory and practice of terrorism policy in both the past and present. 4. Connect criminological theories to terrorism. Prerequisites: CJ 3270 (can be concurrently enrolled) AND CJ 3300 (can be concurrently enrolled).

CJ 4500. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of theoretical issues in criminal justice. Students will engage in research and presentations on a topic selected by the instructor. Repeatable as topic varies up to 9 credits. Consult course schedule for rotation. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Produce insightful critiques concerning material covered in class. 2. Improve written and verbal communication skills. 3. Enhance and further their critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: CJ 3270.

CJ 4790. Capstone Research in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Criminal Justice capstone requirement. Requires consolidation of information, skills, and knowledge learned throughout students' undergraduate studies, particularly in the core and research areas, to conduct independent research to further develop their understanding of criminology as a science, contemporary issues and techniques in digital forensics, and/or other criminal justice topics. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply knowledge gained throughout their studies to either: a) produce a piece of new research; or b) serve as a community volunteer. 2. Examine either a criminal justice issue (in the case of a research project) or their own experiences (in the case of a community volunteer) in order to better understand the criminal justice system as well as offer critiques to certain facets of the criminal justice system. 3. Build on existing knowledge gained through past studies to transition into a career or graduate school after graduation. Prerequisite: CJ 3300, Criminal Justice major, and Senior status. FA, SP.

CJ 4860R. Criminology Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Students work with local or regional agencies or institutions or faculty on professional research. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Offered upon sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Experience work with local or regional agencies or institutions or faculty on professional research. 2. Apply the knowledge gained through their coursework to real-life experiences within these agencies, institutions, or with faculty. 3. Enhance and further their critical thinking skills. 4. Improve written and verbal communication skills. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

CJ 4875. Criminal Justice Sr Practicum. 1 Hour.

Designed to help seniors graduating in criminal justice become acquainted with career opportunities and to prepare resumes for employment or graduate school. Students will refine interview skills; create and foster social networks with local employers; learn about graduate school resources; and explore post-graduate options. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Improve verbal and written communication skills. 2. Prepare for career or graduate studies. Prerequisites: CJ Major and Senior standing. SP.

CJ 4890R. Criminal Justice Internship. 1-3 Hours.

Internship in Criminal Justice emphasizing service-learning and community involvement. Provides actual work experience on a paid or volunteer basic in a criminal justice profession or related approved work situation. Credit hours are dependent on hours worked and other agreed-upon student outcomes. Repeatable up to 3 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Gain actual work experience on a paid or volunteer basic in a criminal justice profession or related approved work situation. 2. Enhance and further their critical thinking skills. 3. Improve written and verbal communication skills. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP.

CJ 4900. Current Issues in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

In-depth study of current issues in criminal justice, with all areas of the Criminal Justice system open to investigation. Including, but not limited to policing, legal, and corrections challenges as well as private industry demands on justice systems. Current issues topics selected by the instructor. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and discuss multiple issues related to criminal justice currently being discussed and debated within the academic community as well as among policy-makers and criminal justice officials. 2. Analyze the rationale behind numerous positions on these current issues. 3. Critique these positions regardless of students' own personal opinions. 4. Explore pragmatic, data-driven responses to issue and problems in the criminal justice system. 5. Improve written and verbal communication skills. Prerequisite: CJ 3270 (Grade C- or higher). SP.