Communication (COMM)

Courses

COMM 1001. FYE: Communication. 1 Hour.

A First Year Experience seminar designed to help students majoring in Communication and Media Studies adapt to college life and become integrated into Dixie State University and the Communication department. Students will refine academic skills, create and foster social networks, learn about college resources, explore different options available within the departments, and learn about career opportunities in our degree programs. Multiple listed with all other sections of First Year Experience (all 1001 courses, ENGR 1000). Students may only take one FYE course for credit. FA.

COMM 1010. Elements of Effective Communication. 3 Hours.

Required for all Communication Studies minors, but open to all students. Introduction to the theory and practice of communication in interpersonal, small group, organizational, and public settings. Includes essential theories through practical experience, including language use, nonverbal communication, organizational structure and practices, persuasion, and presenting. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain and apply the basic theories of Communication in rhetorical, group, organizational, intercultural, and interpersonal settings. 2. Recognize and apply primary principles and techniques of persuasion utilized in various communication contexts, including the formulation and delivery of messages, as well as the analysis of others' messages. 3. Employ and practice effective communication strategies and techniques in various written contexts. 4. Analyze communication problems encountered in real-world situations, using the Communication theories and principles. 5. Evaluate how the perception of both verbal and non-verbal messages influences culture, behavior, and action in our lives. FA, SP, SU.

COMM 1020. Public Speaking. 3 Hours.

Required for Communication Studies majors, but open to all students. Speaking and presenting in front of audiences occurs in almost every career field. This course is for any student with an interest in learning and improving these skills by preparing, outlining, organizing, and presenting various types of speeches, including introductory, informational, persuasive, and others. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain principles of effective oral communication. 2. Explain their personal speaking style, strengths and weaknesses. 3. Illustrate listening, note taking, and observational skills as they prepare public speaking discourses. 4. Formulate audience-centered speaking through public speaking discourses. 5. Critically analyze complex situations when communicating in a public speaking context. FA, SP, SU.

COMM 1050. Introduction to Communication Theory (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences and is an approved Global & Cultural Perspectives course. Required of all Communication Studies and Media Studies majors, and open to all students. Survey of basic issues, theories, concepts, and perspectives in the study of communication, including knowledge of the various contexts of communication and how they differ from each other. Students develop critical thinking and analytical skills; improve listening and observational skills; increase problem solving capabilities; gain insight into their own paradigms and the paradigms of others; and learn how to communicate effectively with others of varying beliefs, values, and cultures in a variety of contexts. Inclusive Access Course Material fees may apply, see Fees tab under each course section for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain how communication is integral to the human experience. 2. Describe some of the basic theories of communication, their origin, and their most well-known proponents, as well as explain how these theories are situated in the Communication paradigm continuum. 3. Differentiate between the various sub disciplines of Communication Studies, including interpersonal, cultural, organizational, interpersonal, and media, and interpret the implications of each area of scholarship. 4. Compare, analyze, and choose appropriate theories for academic and personal topics via critical thinking. 5. Demonstrate and integrate effective and appropriate listening, observational skills, problem-solving capabilities, and cultural competence in communication with others with similar and different beliefs, values, or perspectives. FA, SP.

COMM 1270. Critical Thinking and Communicating. 3 Hours.

Required for all Communication Studies majors, and is open to other interested students. The goal of this course is to examine fundamental elements of reasoning, define and apply intellectual standards, and develop analytical-thinking about the world around us. An important focus is given to open other systems of thinking to connect ideas between disciplines, as well as to understand different perspectives in a diverse and global society. How we think and respond to a variety of issues and situations is essential to problem solving, effective interpersonal communication, professional development and success, and productive engagement in our community and civic lives. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Recognize different types of logical contexts and their basic elements in learning. 2. Describe how concepts from different disciplines can be understood using the tools of critical thinking. 3. Recognize and illustrate how fallacies affect good reasoning. 4. Apply strategic thinking and take charge of daily activities. 5. Recognize and illustrate media biases and propaganda in different contexts. 6. Evaluate own decision-making pattern, and create solutions to repetitive poor problem solving habits. 7. Analyze role of language in ethical reasoning and analysis. 8. Apply reflective thinking to challenge own egocentric and sociocentric tendencies. FA, SP, SU.

COMM 2020R. Forensics Institute. 3 Hours.

For students enrolled in the Sun Country Forensics Institute summer workshop seeking to enhance their Policy, Lincoln-Douglas, and/or individual event debate knowledge and skills. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions.

COMM 2110. Interpersonal Communication (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences, and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Required of all Communication Studies majors, but open to all students. Focuses on communication skills in a wide range of interpersonal areas appropriate to business or personal relationships, and involving initiating, developing, maintaining, and controlling the deterioration of relationships, with emphasis on listening, assertiveness, supportive climates, conflict, power management, and disclosure. Introduces the special needs of intercultural communication, and prepares students to effectively express ideas in one-to-one settings. Inclusive Access Course Material fees may apply, see Fees tab under each course section for details. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify, explain, and demonstrate interpersonal communication theories, models, and processes. 2. Develop and apply critical thinking and analytical skills in interpersonal communication contexts. 3. Employ and assess effective listening, observational, and problem-solving strategies in dyadic and group settings. 4. Describe and differentiate between constructive and deconstructive communication approaches. 5. Explain and evaluate the relationships between power, identity, culture, and disclosure in interpersonal communication contexts. 6. Describe and apply pragmatic strategies for relationship generation, maintenance, and termination. 7. Analyze and evaluate personal communication and relationships through self-reflection, self-awareness, and recognition of various cultural and environmental norms. FA, SP, SU.

COMM 2120. Small Group Communication. 3 Hours.

Required for all Communication Studies majors, but open to all students interested in small group communication in familial, work, social, religious, civic, or educational environments. Covers the formal and unspoken rules of conduct, roles, and expectations of performance unique to each group, as well as how to function productively in small group settings. Also reviews criteria for effective group decision-making. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe fundamental theories and concepts related to effective small group communication. 2. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of working in groups. 3. Explain pragmatic strategies for work group generation, maintenance and termination. 4. Present effective oral presentations in a small group format. 5. Present effective oral presentations in a small group format. FA, SP.

COMM 2700. Voice and Civility in Public Discourse. 3 Hours.

Required for Communication Studies majors, but open to all interested students. This course has two primary objectives applicable to all students. First, the course surveys theoretical frameworks for examining public discourse through lenses that identify the mass communication appeals used in democratic societies and capitalistic markets. Second, the course assists students in developing their own civil voice as citizen-consumers through adopting a critical eye on public discourse. Using a case-study approach, students learn to identify and analyze rhetorical appeals in free speech, social movements, mass media, the news industry, advertising, art, entertainment, and popular culture. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Understand the challenge of discovering and using civil voice effectively. 2. Identify the role of discourse in democracy, including its birth in ancient Athens. 3. Comprehend basic rhetorical methods for analyzing public discourse, specifically Aristotelian proofs, basic Burkean concepts, and introductory critical theory. 4. Analyze public discourse with rhetorical methods. 5. Dissect the role of rhetoric in social movements. 6. Identify the presence of ideology in public discourse. 7. Explain the impact of rhetoric during media production. FA, SP, SU.

COMM 2710. Communication Principles of Mentorship. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, required in the Applied Leadership emphasis, and open to all students. Explores the role of communication in mentoring relationships to prepare students for mentoring roles. Applies practice and theory from a variety of core communication courses. Through experiential learning, students will employ mentoring skills and discover best practices for successful mentoring relationships. Further, students will identify how mentorship skills facilitate leadership skills relating to presentation, nonverbal communication, collaboration and persuasive strategies. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Employ mentoring skills and discover best practices for successful mentoring relationships. 2. Identify how mentorship skills facilitates leadership skills relating to presentation, nonverbal communication, collaboration and persuasive strategies. 3. Apply communication theories to dyadic relationships through mentoring examples. 4. Practice mentoring skills within the classroom and their personal lives. 5. Identify quality mentoring skills. FA.

COMM 3010. Nonverbal Communication. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, but open to all students. Course considers the role that non-verbal behavior plays in communication and miscommunication. Students identify and analyze communicative acts involving self-monitoring and interpretation of others' behaviors (e.g., eye contact, body language, facial expression) in an effort to increase students' communication and behavior-related skills and apply these skills in social and professional contexts. Prerequisite: COMM 2110. FA.

COMM 3060. Communication Theory. 3 Hours.

Required for Communication Studies majors, but open to all students. Develops awareness, understanding, and application of the complex theories and concepts inherent in the study of Communication. Focuses on theoretical, conceptual, and applied research and scholarship that investigates ways in which people communicate, the consequences of those interactions, and the application of those theories and concepts to everyday life. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and differentiate between ontology, epistemology, and axiology approaches to Communication theories and traditions. 2. Explain and apply axioms of Communication theories, principles and ethics. 3. Recognize and analyze connections, relationships, and differences among communication theories and applications. 4. Compose a well-crafted research prospectus by integrating Communication theories, principles, axioms, logic, critical thinking, and written communication skills. 5. Apply and evaluate Communication theories, traditions and strategies in interpersonal, group, organizational, and cultural contexts beyond the classroom. Prerequisite: COMM 1050. FA, SP.

COMM 3120. Family Communication. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, and other interested students. Study of the complexities and influences of the family structure as representative of culture. This includes communication structure, interaction patterns, parenthood, abuse, conflict, family goals of finance and education, and dealing with rapid changes in restructuring when people enter and leave the family unit. Covers family interactions from the first meeting of partners to the final stages of life. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain different types of families and definitions of families. 2. Identify family structures, patterns, rules and roles. 3. Interpret family systems and patterns of communication. 4. Assess family communication challenges and formulate possible interventions based on theory and research. 5. Analyze social, cultural, ethical and contextual factors that impact family communication. Prerequisite: COMM 2110 or Instructor Permission. FA, SP.

COMM 3130. Rhetoric and Public Communication. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, but open to all students who have an interest in history, politics, or social movements. This course is designed to give students an understanding of the role of communication at the foundation of democracy and its role in cultures' oratorical traditions, storytelling, and mass culture. Specific focus is given to speech during periods of history that led philosophers to conceptualize the art of effective communication. Students are introduced to classical and modern theories as well as contemporary theories of power and justice, and they learn how to use these as lenses for both historical and current issues. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain basic definitions and concepts of rhetoric. 2. Explain the birth of rhetorical theory in ancient Greece and Rome and its relationship to current civic politics. 3. Explain modern and contemporary rhetorical thought. 4. Demonstrate how rhetorical insight informs the human condition, political and social processes, and knowledge. 5. Critique modern expressions of rhetorical communication with classical rhetorical theories. FA.

COMM 3150. Lying and Deception. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, and other interested students. Addresses what research identifies as an increase in deception in all aspects of human affairs. Students will identify the differences between whole truths, half-truths, expedient momentary acts of deception, and how these acts inform culture, while exploring the consequences of deception in human affairs and the ethical violations that accompany these acts. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe fundamental theories and concepts related to lying and deception. 2. Apply ethical decision making when considering the use of deceptive practices. 3. Explain examples of lying and deception within interpersonal, political, rhetorical and social contexts. 4. Demonstrate examples of self-protective consumer skills. 5. Assess types of nonverbal behaviors that suggest deception. Prerequisite: COMM 2110. FA.

COMM 3180. Provider and Patient Relations. 3 Hours.

For Communications Studies majors, required in the Health Communication emphasis, and open to all students interested in health, wellness, and medicine, professionally or personally. An examination of effective theories, frameworks, techniques and interventions used to develop effective communication between health and wellness providers and their patients. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Compare and contrast physician-centered vs. collaborative communication models in health settings. 2. Analyze theories and frameworks related to patient-centered medicine and provider-patient relations. 3. Apply motivational enhancement theory methods to assess provider-patient case studies. 4. Determine the rationale for the use of motivational enhancement, patient-centered medicine and collaborative healthcare techniques. 5. Comprehend and evaluate how various health communication techniques potentially affect patient outcomes. 6. Assess ethical and cultural contexts that impact provider-patient relations. FA.

COMM 3190. Intercultural Communication (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

This course fulfills the General Education requirement for Social and Behavioral Sciences and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Required of Communication Studies majors, and open to all other interested students. Develops cross-cultural, global understanding, cultural sensitivity, and perspective-taking. Focuses on theoretical and conceptual immersion in extant cross-cultural research and scholarship. Includes various forms and formats of media, culturally sensitive audience analysis, increased diversity sensitivity and understanding, as well as design and delivery of messages that are culturally appropriate and effective via traditional channels and new media technologies. Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior Standing. FA, SP, SU.

COMM 3200. Community Health Communication. 3 Hours.

Required for Communication Studies majors in the Health Communication emphasis, and satisfies upper division electives for General Communication Studies degree. Open to all students interested in health, wellness, and medicine, professionally or personally. A discussion-driven course that considers various community and public health topics and issues, analyzes contributing factors and connections, and explores the role we play, as both citizens and professionals, in overall health and wellness of our societies. Also includes an examination of communication theories, frameworks, and data used to develop effective community health communication strategies such as campaigns, interventions, health education efforts, and public health initiatives. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Understand the role communication plays in community and public health contexts. 2. Analyze health information and communication for its merit and implications (be a better consumer of health information). 3. Apply understanding of public, local, and global health concerns and how they develop. 4. Explore and evaluate with the diverse opportunities available to community professionals and scholars. 5. Critique community health communication and promotion based on communication theory and application. 6. Design community health messages based on the analysis of the health issue and audience composition. SP.

COMM 3230. Health Communication. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, required in the health communication emphasis, and open to all students interested in health, wellness, and medicine, professionally or personally. While patient-provider communication is important, it doesn't occur in a "vacuum." This course acknowledges and explores the overlapping and mutually-influential situations that affect our physical, mental, and social health, and surveys the many areas of theory and research on, and influence of, health communication in many contexts. The course considers health communication in the areas of: medical and provider relations, family interactions, social support, health systems and policy, organizations, diversity and culture, and media--all of which individually and collectively affect health beliefs, behaviors, and outcomes. Dual listed with HLOC 3230 (students may take only one course for credit). **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Comprehend the role communication plays in health in interpersonal, social, cultural, organizational/political, and mediated contexts. 2. Recognize and identify the dimensions of health and communication, and why these are important to communication. 3. Analyze health communication for its merit and implications (be a better consumer of health information). 4. Apply improved communication and decision making skills in health contexts. 5. Explore and evaluate with the diverse opportunities in health communication available to community professionals and scholars. 6. Recognize, synthesize, and evaluate how myriad health influences and contexts from our health system, interpersonal interactions, social norms, media content, and historical influences overlap to affect any singular health interaction. FA, SP.

COMM 3330. Negotiations and Bargaining. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, required in the Applied Leadership emphasis, and open to any interested students. Explores the processes and outcomes of negotiation and bargaining principles, theories, and related concepts by engaging in experiential opportunities in which students apply those principles and gain skills in negotiation and bargaining in current social and professional settings. Includes professional guest speakers. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe fundamental theories and concepts of negotiations and bargaining in different contexts. 2. Explain and apply effective conflict negotiating skills. 3. Apply negotiation skills through role-plays and group practice. 4. Apply appropriate methods of negotiation through case studies addressing various situations. 5. Assess ethical practices that inform negotiation outcomes. 6. Integrate negotiation and bargaining theories and skills into their lived experiences outside of academia. Prerequisite: COMM 1270. SP.

COMM 3350. Interviewing. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, and any interested students wishing to learn and apply effective interviewing techniques, whether on the interviewer or interviewee side. Focuses upon dyadic communication conducted specifically for gathering information and seeking entrance into closed workplaces, clubs, social, educational, or recreational groups. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Recognize and apply various theories of interviewing in employment, investigative, and persuasive contexts. 2. Construct and reply to proper interviewing questions in both interviewer and interviewee roles. 3. Prepare thoroughly and thoughtfully for interviews in different settings with different group or dyadic dynamics. 4. Simulate, practice, and critique various types of interviews. 5. Analyze their own interviewing skills, as well as peers', based on interviewing theories and concepts. 6. Integrate interviewing concepts and application from the classroom with "real world" scenarios and practical applications outside of the classroom in sales, employment, health, and journalism. SP.

COMM 3400. Gender Communication. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors and all other interested students. Students learn, analyze, and apply theories and research on the verbal and nonverbal interactions between men and women to encourage the development of communication skills between genders so that interpersonal and professional interactions are more successful and effective. Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior Standing. FA, SP.

COMM 3460. Critical and Rhetorical Analysis. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, and open to all students interested in improving their critical evaluation of public communication. Designed to enable students to be responsible consumers of public messages through introduction of the criticism of communication messages and media. Students will be introduced to the analysis of public address advertising, television, film, and literature as sites for critique. Introduces students to a range of methodological approaches to analyzing messages in linguistic and critical traditions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the humanities tradition of intellectual inquiry. 2. Illustrate key modes of rhetorical criticism, namely Aristotelian criticism, Pentadic criticism, ideological criticism, feminist criticism, and cluster criticism. 3. Model rhetorical critiques of texts that students find particularly significant. 4. Evaluate the human condition through insightful analysis that offers prescriptions for the betterment of society across all cultures. 5. Synthesize and connect rhetorical and critical theories, as well as utilize them as lenses through which to view and evaluate communication regarding current events, contemporary issues, civics, popular culture, and politics. SP.

COMM 3510. Ethics in Communication. 3 Hours.

Required of all Communication Studies majors, and open to all other interested students. Requires students to become well-informed about communication strategies and skills that will develop an ethical sensitivity applicable to all walks of life through an intensive examination and evaluation of how well or how poorly ethical standards are formed, articulated, applied, and defended in communication efforts. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. List and explain the major theories of ethics in both Communication and Media Studies. 2. Describe the historical development of ethical standards in both communication and media, as well as demonstrate why these trajectories matter within the discipline. 3. Explain why ethical standards are critical to all forms of Communication. 4. Recognize and analyze (un)ethical conduct and strategies used by influential contemporary communicators, as well as propose solutions to ethical shortcomings. 5. Identify ethical communication dilemmas, isolate and examine the significant issue(s), and then choose or create an appropriate method of resolution. 6. Articulate at least four specific ethical situations they have (or likely will) experience as a professional communicator, and evaluate ethical and applicable responses. Prerequisite: COMM 1010 OR COMM 2110. FA, SP.

COMM 3550. Organizational Communication. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, and all other interested students. Especially complementary to business students or those who seek leadership positions during their careers. Examines organizational communication theories and concepts in detail, particularly with a view toward modern applications within a range of current professional settings. Course will advance students' abilities to understand the dynamics of communication within and across organizations, apply appropriate theories and concepts in analyses of intra- and inter-organizational interactions, and evaluate human behavior in large groups, comprehend organizational policies, and the positive and negative consequences of communication decisions within businesses and other organizations.

COMM 3850. Organizational Communication and System Dynamics. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, required in the Applied Leadership emphasis, and open to all interested students. Especially complementary to business or communication students or those who seek leadership positions during their careers. Focuses on complex processes inherent in organizations, including theoretical, conceptual, and applied research and scholarship that reviews why organizations succeed and why they fail, especially how organizations come to be, analysis of organizations to identify strengths and weaknesses, and identification of successful personal roles. Offers insights into organizational structure and cross-communicative patterns within organizations as well as an understanding of organizations from a Systems Dynamics perspective. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe fundamental theories and concepts of organizational communication. 2. Explain examples of effective non-verbal and verbal forms of communication in organizational settings. 3. Compare and contrast different organizations by analyzing their communication needs, values, goals, strategies and ethical considerations. 4. Evaluate effective organizational communication strategies. 5. Apply definitions and theories of leadership and high performance teams to organizational communication case studies, as well as organizations of which they are members. SP.

COMM 3990. Special Topics in Communication. 0.5-3 Hours.

Open to all students. Course that offers rotating special topics from faculty. Students may also request instruction on an area or topic that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in the Communication Studies discipline. Whether proposed by faculty or students, the seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair. It also must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered, and it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other traditional or nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course fulfills Communication Studies emphasis electives or general upper division elective hours. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

COMM 4010. Persuasion. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, required in the Health Communication emphasis, and open to all other students interested in learning to persuade. Develops awareness, understanding, and application of critical thinking and persuasive message design to achieve intended persuasive effects on specific audiences. Focuses on rhetorical, social scientific, conceptual, and applied research and scholarship that explores both traditional and modern persuasive processes in both oral and written persuasive messages. Critical thinking skills are developed through analysis of audiences and positional arguments and their construction. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe the axioms of persuasive communication and its principles and ethics. 2. Distinguish between different audiences by correctly analyzing their needs, values, general tendencies, and all ethical considerations applicable to a specific audience. 3. Explain the strengths and weaknesses of the perceptual process of communication. 4. Explain the importance of attending and listening to the other person, and demonstrate listening behaviors that display understanding in different contexts and cultures. 5. Apply and evaluate persuasion fundamentals and theories through written or oral works that address the social contexts experienced in both their personal and professional lives. 6. Evaluate the interplay between the persuasive source, the topic, the theory or framework, and the responsive audience. Prerequisite: COMM 1270. FA, SP.

COMM 4020. Integrated Oral Presentations. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, and other interested students. Develops theory-based skills integrating public speaking with technology by expanding presentational skills and message impact through production and incorporation of electronic images. Successful completers will understand integrated delivery strategies and develop a technological foundation to support this sophisticated form of public speaking. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and differentiate between cognitive and affective tools of visual support for their presentations. 2. Explain effective speech principles through rehearsal and delivery of integrated oral presentations. 3. Create impactful visual and motion information within oral presentations. 4. Integrate presentation software effectively within oral presentations. 5. Formulate and deliver oral presentations that meet the contextual needs of any given audience. Prerequisite: COMM 1020. FA.

COMM 4030. Applied Organizational Communication Research. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors and open to all students. Examines modern research initiatives in organizational communication theories and concepts in detail, particularly with a view toward modern applications within a range of current professional settings. Students will design and implement original research emerging from case study. Successful completers will increase their abilities to apply appropriate theories and concepts in analyses of organizations, human behavior, organizational policies and their consequences. Prerequisite: COMM 4450.

COMM 4050. Leadership and High Performance Teams. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, required in the Applied Leadership emphasis, and open to all interested students. Emphasizes development of teamwork and the principles of high performance teams, including conceptualization and practice of the many types of leadership and their effective applications. Successful students will increase skills and understanding of group processes and leadership dynamics within groups. Prerequisite: COMM 2120. SP.

COMM 4450. Communication Research. 3 Hours.

Required for Communication and Media Studies majors. Focuses on Communication-specific quantitative, qualitative, and critical research methodologies through a process of Communication research design and analysis. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe quantitative, qualitative, and rhetorical research methods used in Communication Studies. 2. Explain connections between Communication theories and research in oral and written form. 3. Formulate research methods and concepts in oral and written form. 4. Create quantitative, qualitative, and/or rhetorical research designs and apply appropriate associated methods in an ethical manner to a student research initiative. 5. Evaluate and critique research designs, methods, and writing found in scholarly and popular sources. Prerequisite: COMM 3060 or MDIA 3060 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA, SP.

COMM 4490. Communication and Contemporary Public Issues. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors and open to any other interested students. An analysis of public issues that currently dominate public communication and the media landscape, including the impact of ae effective communication. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe trends in business, education, politics, health, popular culture, and technology and their relationship to communication theories and skills as key influences. 2. Develop a comprehension of how rhetorical strategies impact changes in international policy and vice-versa. 3. Analyze how political, legal and economic changes affect society and are reflected in society's communication. 4. Apply rhetorical skills s in areas such as employment, health, immigration, and political change. 5. Analyze communication from public leaders using rhetorical methods. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. SP.

COMM 4500. Communication and Conflict. 3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors, required in the Applied Leadership emphasis, and open to all students. Explores the theoretical and conceptual foundations of conflict, primarily at the interpersonal, dyadic level, as well as the sources, types, and outcomes of their application. Successful students will increase awareness of the sources of conflict and demonstrate skill development in resolution techniques, as well as be able to apply this awareness and skill to their personal and professional relationships with others. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Understand fundamental human conflict theories and concepts. 2. Demonstrate confidence in utilizing interpersonal conflict negotiating skills. 3. Recognize types of conflict and appropriate methods of dealing with conflicts. 4. Demonstrate conflict resolutions skills. 5. Apply interpersonal conflict resolution skills across various cultural settings. Prerequisite: COMM 2110 or instructor approval. FA, SP.

COMM 4890R. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

For Communication Studies majors with advanced standing who wish to pursue a specific focus of study related to their degree emphasis and/or research interest not otherwise available in the current Communication Studies curriculum. Students and faculty work closely to design and set successful completion goals for the course, which is dependent upon a formal contractual arrangement with the faculty member that is submitted at the beginning of the semester in which coursework is undertaken. The proposed course is contingent upon the department chair's approval. Students are required meet the college requirement of 45 hours of work per credit. Variable credit 1.0 - 3.0. Repeatable up to 9 credits. Prerequisites: Communication major, and Instructor permission. FA, SP, SU.

COMM 4900R. Communication Internship. 3 Hours.

Required for all Communication Studies and Media Studies majors. Designed to integrate students into professional communication environments to increase competencies and initiate networking. Potential environments include broadcast and feature motion picture production, corporate and business communication, public relations, journalism, etc. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP, SU.

COMM 4980. Senior Seminar. 4 Hours.

Required for all Communication Studies & Media Studies majors. Students complete a culminating scholarly project (research, production, etc.) that allows students to demonstrate competency in, and application of, communication knowledge and skills. Through the Capstone Project (final project) students will demonstrate the achievement of the Communication Department Learning Objectives. Students will work with an instructor to complete appropriate documentation of the project (for example, paper, peer reviewed presentation, public editorial approval, etc.). **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze communication phenomenon utilizing theory and research. 2. Develop a scholarly project considering ethical and cultural contexts. 3. Organize the implementation and completion of a scholarly project. 4. Synthesize communication theory and research in written and oral form. 5. Apply communication theory and research to a "real-world" project. Prerequisite: COMM 4450 or Instructor permission. FA, SP, SU.