English (ENGL)

Courses

ENGL 1000. Reading and Writing for Academic Success. 5 Hours.

Teaches basics of paragraph and essay organization and development, as well as critical thinking. Focuses on encoding (writing) and decoding (reading) skills in academic writing and reading activities. Assignments, activities, and tests relate to writing and critical reading skills. Successful students will be able to write structured, developed, and coherent paragraphs and essays which are relatively free of mechanical errors; edit and proofread their own work; and analyze the work of others in small and large groups. They will also be able to apply critical and analytical reading skills to comprehend and evaluate sophisticated and complex reading materials. Grade C or higher prepares students to enter ENGL 1010. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Create well-constructed paragraphs that demonstrate college-level thinking, focus (with a topic idea that is either stated or clearly implied), unity, development, and coherency. 2. Demonstrate outlining skills while reading and writing. 3. Explain the interrelated skills of encoding and decoding. 4. Demonstrate facility of basic structural and mechanical elements of writing as indicated on the Grading Standards sheet. 5. Critically evaluate each other's writings and the clarity of other written material. 6. Create essays, such as those expected in English 1010, with a minimum of five paragraphs that demonstrate college-level writing ability. 7. Demonstrate critical reading ability by comprehending rhetorical modes and organizational structures as well as by locating and accurately paraphrasing key ideas, recognizing underlying assumptions, and recognizing key supporting details. Prerequisites: ACT or equivalent English placement score of 13 or below. FA, SP.

ENGL 1002. Writing Bridge. 1 Hour.

Optional course for students with ACT 10-13 or equivalent CPT or SAT placement scores. Introduces students to college-level writing. Assignments and activities include writing and editing stand-alone paragraphs and short essays. Successful students will be prepared to retake the English college-placement test at the conclusion of the bridge course so they might bypass English 1000 and enroll directly into English 1010 or 1010D in the fall semester. Pass/Fail. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Create a well-constructed stand-alone paragraph, such as those which might be found on written exams or informal writing assignments, incorporating a topic sentence, clearly-stated main points, and supporting details. 2. Explain the interrelated skills of encoding and decoding. 3. Recognize grammatically-correct sentences and be able to retake the English portion of the CPT with a high enough placement score to allow them to enroll in English 1010 or 1010D (rather than English 1000). Prerequisite: Writing ACT/English placement score of 10 or above. SU.

ENGL 1010. Introduction to Writing (EN). 3 Hours.

Partially fulfills General Education English requirement. Designed to improve students' abilities to read, analyze, and write expository papers. Provides opportunities to write and revise a number of essays. Activities, library research, portfolios, writing to a style guide, and tests may also be used to prepare students to write college level papers. Successful completers (grade C or higher) will be prepared to take ENGL 2010. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate evidence and logic - including the identification of underlying assumptions, biases, and fallacies - in various texts. 2. Apply relevant, convincing, and effective evidence and logic in a variety of oral and written interactions. 3. Participate in the process of collaborative learning as it relates to reading and writing. 4. Compose an essay with a precise thesis statement that controls the selection, structure, and presentation of material. 5. Create competent essays and paragraphs through the writing process using standard written English. 6. Incorporate research into essays through adequate quotation, paraphrasing and summarizing. 7. Explain and avoid plagiarism. Prerequisites: Writing: ACT/English placement score of 17; or ENGL 1000 (Grade C or higher); or completion of all 4 advanced ESL courses: 2700 (Grade B or higher) and 2750 (Grade B or higher) and 2760 (Grade B or higher) and either ESL 2780 (Grade B or higher) or ESL 1580 (Grade A). FA, SP.

ENGL 1010A. Honors Intro to Writing (EN). 3 Hours.

Partially fulfills General Education English requirement. Designed to improve students' abilities to read, analyze, and write expository papers. Provides opportunities to write and revise a number of essays. Activities, library research, portfolios, writing to a style guide, and tests may also be used to prepare students to write college level papers. Successful completers (Grade C or higher) will be prepared to take ENGL 2010. Honors designation indicates greater student interaction, higher level of inquiry, and public presentation of a research project. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate evidence and logic - including the identification of underlying assumptions, biases, and fallacies - in various texts. 2. Apply relevant, convincing, and effective evidence and logic in a variety of oral and written interactions. 3. Participate in the process of collaborative learning as it relates to reading and writing. 4. Compose an essay with a precise thesis statement that controls the selection, structure, and presentation of material. 5. Create competent essays and paragraphs through the writing process using standard written English. 6. Incorporate research into essays through adequate quotation, paraphrasing and summarizing. 7. Explain and avoid plagiarism. Prerequisites: Honors, Admission to the DSU Honors Program OR program director permission; Writing, ACT/English placement score 19 or higher; Reading, ACT/reading-placement score 17 or higher. FA.

ENGL 1010D. Introduction to Writing (EN). 4 Hours.

Partially fulfills General Education English requirement. Designed to improve students' abilities to read, analyze, and write expository papers. Provides opportunities to write and revise a number of essays. Activities, library research, portfolios, writing to a style guide, and tests may also be used to prepare students to write college level papers. Includes practical writing instruction and in-class workshops. Successful completers (Grade C or higher) will be prepared to take ENGL 2010. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate evidence and logic - including the identification of underlying assumptions, biases, and fallacies - in various texts. 2. Apply relevant, convincing, and effective evidence and logic in a variety of oral and written interactions. 3. Participate in the process of collaborative learning as it relates to reading and writing. 4. Compose an essay with a precise thesis statement that controls the selection, structure, and presentation of material. 5. Create competent essays and paragraphs through the writing process using standard written English. 6. Incorporate research into essays through adequate quotation, paraphrasing and summarizing. 7. Explain and avoid plagiarism. Prerequisites: Writing: ACT/English placement score 14-16; or ENGL 1000 (Grade C or higher); or completion of all 4 advanced ESL courses: 2700 (Grade B or higher) and 2750 (Grade B or higher) and 2760 (Grade B or higher) and either ESL 2780 (Grade B or higher) or ESL 1580 (Grade A). FA, SP.

ENGL 1410. Elements of Grammar. 3 Hours.

Required of all English majors and recommended for other students interested in improving their knowledge of basic English grammar. Engages students in the study of English grammar to facilitate writing, editing, and an understanding of the relationship between language, formal rules, and meaning. Focuses on the study of sentence structure, the terminology and definitions of traditional grammar, and the conventions of usage and punctuation. Students will analyze written examples, diagram sentences, edit written work, and practice constructing original sentences according to the principles outlined. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify basic parts of speech. 2. Apply basic punctuation conventions to create various rhetorical effects. 3. Construct conventional sentence patterns. 4. Construct common sentence and word-order variations such as active and passive voice to create various rhetorical effects. 5. Modify verb forms in a consistent and accurate manner to create various rhetorical effects. 6. Construct cohesive paragraphs through repetition, known-new contract, metadiscourse, and parallelism. 7. Analyze written work to identify rhetorical effects. FA, SP.

ENGL 2010. Interm Writing Selected Topics: (EN). 3 Hours.

Partially fulfills General Education English requirement. Provides opportunities to analyze and write academic papers, including the research-supported essay, through writing and revising a number of essays. Other activities, such as portfolios, library research, and tests may be used to help students improve their writing of advanced-level papers. Successful students will demonstrate competence in the use of standard written English, in analyzing texts, in correctly paraphrasing, summarizing and quoting source material, and in appropriately citing the work of others. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate evidence and logic - including the critique of underlying assumptions, biases, and fallacies - in various texts. 2. Apply relevant, convincing, and effective evidence and logic in all oral and written interactions. 3. Engage in the process of collaborative learning as it relates to reading and writing. 4. Compose an essay with a precise thesis statement that controls the selection, structure, and presentation of material. 5. Create effective essays and paragraphs through the writing process using standard written English. 6. Incorporate research into essays, annotated bibliographies, research papers, and/or presentations through effective quotation, paraphrasing and summarizing. 7. Explain and avoid plagiarism. Prerequisites: ACT score of 28 or higher; OR ENGL 1010, or ENGL1010A, or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

ENGL 2010A. Honors Intermediate Writing (EN). 3 Hours.

Honors course. Partially fulfills General Education English requirement. Provides opportunities to analyze and write academic papers, including the research-supported essay, through writing and revising a number of essays. Other activities, such as portfolios, library research, and tests may be used to help students improve their writing of advanced-level papers. Successful students will demonstrate competence in the use of standard written English, in analyzing texts, in correctly paraphrasing, summarizing and quoting source material, and in appropriately citing the work of others. Honors designation indicates greater student interaction, higher level of inquiry, and public presentation of a research project. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate evidence and logic - including the critique of underlying assumptions, biases, and fallacies - in various texts. 2. Apply relevant, convincing, and effective evidence and logic in all oral and written interactions. 3. Engage in the process of collaborative learning as it relates to reading and writing. 4. Compose an essay with a precise thesis statement that controls the selection, structure, and presentation of material. 5. Create effective essays and paragraphs through the writing process using standard written English. 6. Incorporate research into essays, annotated bibliographies, research papers, and/or presentations through effective quotation, paraphrasing and summarizing. 7. Explain and avoid plagiarism. Prerequisites: Admission to the DSU Honors Program or program director permission; and ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010A (Grade C or higher). SP.

ENGL 2100. Technical Writing (ALCS). 3 Hours.

Required for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Professional & Technical Writing, and open to students in science and technical disciplines who would like to increase their proficiency in writing. Provides students with opportunities to develop skills useful in professional, workplace settings. The course introduces students to technical formats, brevity and clarity strategies, and visual elements such as headings, lists and graphics. This course is designated as an Active Learning Community Service (ALCS) course. Students provide service in areas of public concern in a way that is mutually beneficial for both the student and community. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and critique structural and design elements in technical documentation. 2. Apply knowledge of technical writing, structure, and design to compose effective documents. 3. Combine and examine researched information in electronic and printed format. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 1010A (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher). FA.

ENGL 2130. Introduction to Science Fiction and Futurism (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Literature/Humanities General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For all students with an interest in the literature of science fiction and futurism. Sharpens students' literary skills, enhances self-knowledge, and increases understanding of the literature of the genre. Helps students to see how science and technology have shaped the modern world and how they may transform the future. The course covers classic and contemporary science fiction novels and uses class discussions and guest lecturers. Course offered in rotation, check class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Examine the basic elements of literature, including fictional and dramatic elements, rhetorical figures, and basic linguistic elements. 2. Appraise (orally and in writing) representative works of literature using appropriate terminology and critical concepts. 3. Investigate how science and technology have shaped the modern world and how they may transform the future. 4. Match the origins of some scientific discoveries and technological advances to specific works of science fiction. 5. List major influential SF authors and scientist who were inspired by them.

ENGL 2140R. Creative Writing. 3 Hours.

For all students with an interest in developing expressive skills through the writing of poetry, short stories, or dramatic presentations on stage and in film; required for English majors pursuing an English Education emphasis. Increases students' understanding of literature, other people, and their own ideas and feelings. Successful students will master material which includes figurative language, alliteration, assonance, rhythm in poetry and prose, dialogue, plot, setting, theme, and the critical vocabulary of the genres mentioned above. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain and demonstrate an understanding of the basic tenets of poetry, creative nonfiction, drama, and fiction. 2. Analyze professional and student writing, recognizing areas where writers successfully exhibit enhanced technique as well as where writers need improvement. 3. Participate in collaborative learning by utilizing a conventional creative writing workshop model. 4. Perform investigative and/or observational research, focus relevant details, and integrate research into the creative voice. 5. Investigate and partake in the process of publication, including journal searches, query letters, and submissions. FA, SP.

ENGL 2200. Introduction to Literature (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Literature/Humanities General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For all students who would like to increase their enjoyment of literature. Provides basic understanding of novels, short stories, poems, plays, and essays. Students will learn to read analytically and write critically. Course offered in rotation, check class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze, orally and/or in written form, literary concepts including setting, characterization, theme, point of view, figurative language, and plot. 2. Examine ethical values and critically discuss philosophical concerns in literature. 3. Create both formal critical essays and informal responses to concerns expressed in course texts. 4. Apply the techniques of effective collaboration through successful completion of various group activities.

ENGL 2201. Literature and the Land (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Literature/Humanities General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Introduces students to environmental literature and its historical development. Focuses on literary works from the eighteenth century to the present, students will read major authors and works and examine the concerns and values that have given rise to twentieth-century environmentalism and environmental literature. Students will survey a variety of texts, including poetry, short stories, novels, and personal and scholarly essays. Thematic concerns will revolve around questions of belonging, sustainability, urbanization, environmental activism, and, not least, the intersections of literature and the sciences. Further, students will engage with common practices in reading, interpreting, and writing about literature, and will address questions of literary form and genre, the relationship between literary works and the cultures that produce them, and how and why we read. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain and identify the characteristics of environmental literature in various literary genres. 2. Analyze, orally and/or in written form, literary aspects of environmental literature, including setting, characterization, theme, point of view, figurative language, and plot. 3. Assess ethical values and critically discuss philosophical concerns in environmental literature. 4. Produce researched and creative writings, as well as informal responses to concerns expressed in course texts. 5. Collaborate with peers on textual analyses. SP (even).

ENGL 2230. Introduction to Mythology (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Literature/Humanities General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For all students with an interest in the myths of the Greeks, Romans, Vikings, Slavs, and Celts. Provides a brief look at the historical backgrounds of the above peoples and their myths and some of the ways in which myths have been used in literature from Homer to contemporary fantasy and science fiction. Course offered in rotation, check class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and discuss (through class discussions and written assignments) the main myths of the Greeks, Romans, and Vikings, Celts, and Slavs. 2. Analyze the historical backgrounds of these peoples and their myths and some of the ways in which myths have been used in literature and life from Homer to the present. 3. Locate mythological characters in their original settings. 4. Differentiate among the many variations of myth that shape our stories, societies, and thoughts today. 5. Originate communication across cultural boundaries and offer solutions to the issues concerning multiple cultures. 6. Assess sources from a variety of perspectives and use those sources to inform discussion of problems in the global community.

ENGL 2270. World Literature Before 1650 (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills Literature/Humanities General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For all students with an interest in improving their enjoyment of world literature. Introduces representative masterpieces from ancient, medieval, and Renaissance literature. Surveys a variety of literary masterpieces from all over the world, including ancient Egypt, ancient Greece, India, China, and Japan. Engages students with common practices in reading, interpreting, and writing about literature, and addresses questions of literary form and genre, the relationship between literary works and the cultures that produce them, and how and why we read. Course offered in rotation, check class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of the importance and scope of the literature for the time period covered by creating connections, both verbal and written, between various texts and authors. 2. Investigate the significance of a wide variety of genres from the literary movements and time periods covered through short written and oral responses and reflections. 3. Identify and explain the significance of major authors and movements covered in this survey. 4. Analyze and critique a specific literary text in a meaningful and effective fashion, doing far more than stating the obvious. 5. Synthesize relevant scholarly sources with the student's own original ideas in a balanced manner (quotations, paraphrases, and summaries fit nicely with paragraph main ideas and topic sentences).

ENGL 2280. World Literature After 1650 (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills Literature/Humanities General Education and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For all students with an interest in improving their enjoyment of world literature. Introduces representative literary masterpieces from the eighteenth century to the present. Students will survey a variety of literature from writers around the globe. Engages students with common practices in reading, interpreting, and writing about literature, and addresses questions of literary form and genre, the relationship between literary works and the cultures that produce them, and how and why we read. Course offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of the importance and scope of the literature for the time period covered by creating connections, both verbal and written, between various texts and authors. 2. Investigate the significance of a wide variety of genres from the literary movements and time periods covered through short written and oral responses and reflections. 3. Identify and explain the significance of major authors and movements covered in this survey. 4. Analyze and critique a specific literary text in a meaningful and effective fashion, doing far more than stating the obvious. 5. Synthesize relevant scholarly sources with the student's own original ideas in a balanced manner (quotations, paraphrases, and summaries fit nicely with paragraph main ideas and topic sentences).

ENGL 2330. Children's Literature (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For students who love children and reading or who have an interest in elementary education, child development, or parenthood. Teaches the historical development of children's literature; examines literary elements, such as characterization, plot, and style; focuses on a broad spectrum of literary genres in children's literature, such as realistic fiction, picture books, poetry, and informational books; and acquaints students with major authors and illustrators of children's literature, past and present. Students will create a file of all books and stories read in addition to tests, quizzes, and papers on textbook readings. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze orally and in written form literary aspects of children's literature including plot, setting, characterization, theme, point of view, and figurative language. 2. Compare and differentiate the characteristics of quality vs. subpar children's literature of various literary genres. 3. Critique works of children's literature in order to select the best literature to engage and meet the needs of children. 4. Investigate current issues and trends in children's literature and formulate informed personal positions regarding these issues and trends. FA.

ENGL 2335. Multi-Cultural Child/Young Adult Literature (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement and is an approved Global & Cultural Perspectives course. For students who love children and reading or have an interest in elementary education, child development, or parenthood in a global society that recognizes and supports diversity. Teaches the historical development of children's literature throughout the world; examines literary elements such as characterization, plot, and style; focuses on multicultural and international literature for children in a broad spectrum of literary genres such as realistic fiction, picture books, poetry, traditional literature, past and present. Students will critically examine themes and issues relating specifically to multicultural and international literature. Course offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze orally and in written form literary aspects of multi-cultural children's and young adult literatures including plot, setting, characterization, theme, point of view, and figurative language. 2. Compare and differentiate the characteristics of quality vs. subpar multi-cultural children's and young adult literature from various literary genres. 3. Critique works of multi-cultural children's and young adult literature in order to select the best multi-cultural literature to engage and meet the needs of children and young adults. 4. Investigate current issues and trends in multi-cultural children's and young adult literature and formulate informed personal positions regarding these issues and trends.

ENGL 2400. American Lit Before 1865 (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. This course will introduce students to some of the major writers and works in American literature from the Colonial Period to the American Renaissance. Students will survey a variety of literature, from the sermons and poetry of the early Puritans to the seminal essays, poetry and fiction of the American Renaissance. Engages students with common practices in reading, interpreting, and writing about literature, and it will address questions of literary form and genre, the relationship between literary works and the cultures that produce them, and how and why we read. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of the importance and scope of the literature for the time period covered by creating connections, both verbal and written, between various texts and authors. 2. Through short written and oral responses and reflections, investigate the significance of a wide variety of genres from the literary movements and time periods covered. 3. Identify and explain the significance of major authors and movements covered in this survey. 4. Analyze and critique a specific literary text in a meaningful and effective fashion, doing far more than stating the obvious. 5. Synthesize relevant scholarly sources with the student's own original ideas in a balanced manner (quotations, paraphrases, and summaries fit nicely with paragraph main ideas and topic sentences). FA.

ENGL 2410. American Lit After 1865 (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. This course will introduce students to some of the major writers and works in American literature from the Civil War to the present. Students will survey a variety of literature, from the novels and short stories of the realists, to the influential works of the modernists, to the postmodernists and other contemporary writers. Engages students with common practices in reading, interpreting, and writing about literature, and it will address questions of literary form and genre, the relationship between literary works and the cultures that produce them, and how and why we read. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of the importance and scope of the literature for the time period covered by creating connections, both verbal and written, between various texts and authors. 2. Through short written and oral responses and reflections, investigate the significance of a wide variety of genres from the literary movements and time periods covered. 3. Identify and explain the significance of major authors and movements covered in this survey. 4. Analyze and critique a specific literary text in a meaningful and effective fashion, doing far more than stating the obvious. 5. Synthesize relevant scholarly sources with the student's own original ideas in a balanced manner (quotations, paraphrases, and summaries fit nicely with paragraph main ideas and topic sentences). SP.

ENGL 2500. British Literature Before 1800 (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. This course will introduce students to some of the major writers of the British Isles through careful study of a variety of literary works from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 18th century. Engages students with common practices in reading, interpreting and writing about literature, and it will address questions of literary form and genre, the relationship between literary works and the cultures that produce them, and how and why we read. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. At the completion of the course students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of the importance and scope of the literature for the time period covered by creating connections, both verbal and written, between various texts and authors. 2. Through short written and oral responses and reflections, investigate the significance of a wide variety of genres from the literary movements and time periods covered. 3. Identify and explain the significance of major authors and movements covered in this survey. 4. Analyze and critique a specific literary text in a meaningful and effective fashion, doing far more than stating the obvious. 5. Synthesize relevant scholarly sources with the student's own original ideas in a balanced manner (quotations, paraphrases, and summaries fit nicely with paragraph main ideas and topic sentences). FA.

ENGL 2510. British Literature After 1800 (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Humanities requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. This course will introduce students to some of the major writers of the British Isles through careful study of a variety of literary works from the Romantic period to the present. Engages students with common practices in reading, interpreting and writing about literature, and it will address questions of literary form and genre, the relationship between literary works and the cultures that produce them, and how and why we read. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of the importance and scope of the literature for the time period covered by creating connections, both verbal and written, between various texts and authors. 2. Through short written and oral responses and reflections, investigate the significance of a wide variety of genres from the literary movements and time periods covered. 3. Identify and explain the significance of major authors and movements covered in this survey. 4. Analyze and critique a specific literary text in a meaningful and effective fashion, doing far more than stating the obvious. 5. Synthesize relevant scholarly sources with the student's own original ideas in a balanced manner (quotations, paraphrases, and summaries fit nicely with paragraph main ideas and topic sentences). SP.

ENGL 2600. Critical Introduction to Literature (HU, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Literature/Humanities General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Required of all English majors. Introduces literary appreciation, and teaches criticism and terminology as applied to various types of literature, including fiction, poetry, and drama. Requires critical analysis of prose, poetry, and drama. Acquaints students with basic literary terminology, provides a brief survey of pertinent literary theories, and surveys pivotal critical texts. Students respond to texts to understand how meaning is created through transactions among writings, readers and cultures. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the importance and contributions of the major theorists and critical movements covered in this survey. 2. Apply important literary terms and vocabulary to relevant literary and cultural texts. 3. Evaluate the contribution of major theorists and important critical movements to the academic fields of literature and cultural studies. 4. Analyze both canonical and popular literary and cultural texts through specific critical lenses. 5. Create unique researched essays that synthesize theoretical concepts and relevant scholarly research with primary literature. FA, SP.

ENGL 2790. Writing Center Tutoring I. 2 Hours.

Required for tutors in the College's Writing Center, and open to students interested in learning how to tutor writing for either personal satisfaction or professional needs. Covers a variety of writing specific topics, such as grammar, organization, rhetorical invention, revision strategies, and the writing process in general. Also covers principles of tutoring, including using the Socratic method of teaching, tutoring to various learning styles, and dealing with writer's anxiety, as well as the use of computers while tutoring. Successful completers will be able to diagnose writing problems, provide instruction, and interpret course assignments. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain that writing is a process and identify how this process may operate. 2. Identify the many roles the tutor plays within a session. 3. Utilize various methods to guide specific writers through the writing process. 4. Explain the benefits of one-on-one tutoring: that not all writers/students are the same, nor are all assignments the same. FA, SP.

ENGL 2791R. Writing Center Tutoring II. 1 Hour.

Required for tutors in the College's Writing Center, and open to students interested in learning how to tutor writing for either personal satisfaction or professional needs. This course will cover a variety of writing specific topics like grammar, organization, rhetorical invention, revision strategies, and the writing process in general. Covers principles of tutoring such as using the Socratic method of teaching, tutoring to various learning styles, dealing with writer's anxiety, and mentoring other tutors, as well as the use of computers while tutoring. Successful completers will be able to diagnose writing problems, provide instruction and practice, and interpret course assignments. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain that writing is a process and identify how this process may operate. 2. Identify the many roles the tutor plays within a session. 3. Engage in solving tutor-session dilemmas. 4. Create clearly and analyze critically several essay types. 5. Construct grammatically correct and stylistically engaging sentences. 6. Synthesize research with their own ideas and writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 2790. FA, SP.

ENGL 2890R. Journal Pub/Southern Quill. 1-3 Hours.

For students in all disciplines who wish to work with The Southern Quill, Dixie State University's literary magazine, and who want to pursue projects in creative writing such as poetry, short stories, plays, and essays. Students must attend weekly meetings and produce works in the genre(s) of their choice. Variable credit: 1.0 - 3.0. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain and apply the basic tenets of editing and journal production, including but not limited to web development, copy editing, layout and document design, and research. 2. Apply professional and technical writing skills to compose marketing and publicity materials as well as informational documents, email, solicitations, social media, and websites. 3. Professionally meet deadlines and practice professionalism in dealing with campus and community entities. 4. Carry out assigned duties in a timely manner. 5. Analyze various undergraduate literary journals for content and aesthetic considerations. 6. Participate in collaborative learning by working with journal staff members and other interns. 7. Perform investigative and/or observational research, focus relevant details, and integrate research into journals' websites, publications, and publicity materials. 8. Investigate and partake in the process of publication, including journal research. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. SP.

ENGL 3010. Business Communication and Ethics. 3 Hours.

Successful students will understand a common ethical framework, be able to identify when business ethical issues arise and apply the framework to analyze and resolve them. Students also will be able to effectively recognize and model diverse professional communication styles by analyzing various business audiences, writing and presentation purposes, and documents (including extensive formal research reports) based on business communication theory, ethical frameworks and practical application. Dual listed with MGMT 3100. Students may take only one course for credit. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain an ethical framework used in business contexts and identify when ethical issues in business arise for which the framework should be applied. 2. Apply an ethical framework to analyze and resolve ethical dilemmas. 3. Write clear, correct, concise, complete, and culturally aware artifacts for professional contexts. 4. Write, design, and analyze several types of business documents using appropriate media. 5. Synthesize research with their own ideas to produce artifacts and oral presentations that inform and persuade a target audience. 6. Demonstrate the ability to collaborate well with others to produce quality rhetorical documents. Prerequisites: ENGL 2010 (Grade C- or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C- or higher). FA, SP.

ENGL 3030. Advanced College Writing. 3 Hours.

Required of all English majors, and recommended for other students who wish to expand and deepen their skills in critical reading, critical thinking and integrated analysis within a variety of rhetorical contexts. Students will be asked to write several persuasive, argumentative, and expository essays. Based on rhetorical theory and through practical application, students will be able to effectively recognize and model diverse writing styles by analyzing various audiences, writing purposes, and documents. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Compose (and model) a variety of texts in various genres (or modes), for different audiences and purposes - several of which go above and beyond those of typical freshmen and sophomore composition courses. 2. Compose by way of a variety of written voices for different audiences and purposes (within a variety of rhetorical contexts). 3. Compose at least one academic source-synthesis essay that requires reading (and incorporating) academic research into one's own writing (for an academic context and purpose). 4. Explain the ways in which workplace writing is different from academic writing. 5. Compose at least one document synthesizing primary research, such as interviews or surveys. 6. Identify one's own writing processes and how they can be improved. 7. Submit for possible publication at least one written document composed during English 3030. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

ENGL 3120. Document Design. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursuing an emphasis in Professional & Technical Writing, and open to students who wish to create effective professional documents for the workplace. Successful students will demonstrate competence in all aspects of document design, including (but not limited to) the following: overall organization and layout; usability theory, application and testing; data organization and display; visual rhetoric (the use of color, size and white space); and theories of writer-based and reader-based writing. Also examines existing research on how different readers process information in different ways. Students will write their own technical documents, for both print and online contexts, in order to apply knowledge learned in class. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply basic design principles when creating and revising documents. 2. Produce a variety of documents in print and electronic formats appropriate to audience and purpose. 3. Analyze existing documents for contemporary design principles as well as for the rhetoric embodied by the designs. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). SP.

ENGL 3130. Grant and Proposal Writing (ALCS). 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursuing an emphasis in Professional and Technical Writing, and open to other interested students. Focuses on techniques for writing effective grants and proposals, learning about the processes that lead to successful grant and proposal writing, generating and focusing on an idea, writing in a variety of formats, and providing supporting information. Successful students will demonstrate they understand the qualities of an effective proposal through their critiques of funded and non-funded proposals and by writing a proposal. This course is designated as an Active Learning Community Service (ALCS) course. Students provide service in areas of public concern in a way that is mutually beneficial for both the student and community. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Compose a grant proposal that exhibits the fundamental elements of each section. 2. Apply critical thinking when writing the current situation, goal(s), objectives, and tasks. 3. Generate a solid budget and project evaluation plan. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). SP.

ENGL 3140. Fiction Writing. 3 Hours.

Provides experienced writers with the opportunity to improve their understanding of narrative prose writing techniques and the elements of fiction, including plot, dialogue, characterization, setting and symbolism. In addition to producing original works of fiction, including short stories, novellas and excerpts from novels, students become proficient in examining, assessing, and critiquing published works of fiction by established writers. All creative materials produced by students will receive critiques in class workshops. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Craft fiction that employs the basic elements of fiction, such as plot, dialogue, characterization, and symbol. 2. Read and analyze exemplary works of published fiction and use these narratives as models for their own stories. 3. Critique materials produced for class by colleagues, providing suggestions for effective revision. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher) AND ENGL 2140R (Grade C or higher). SP.

ENGL 3141. Poetry Writing. 3 Hours.

Provides experienced writers with the opportunity to improve their understanding of poetry writing techniques and the elements of poetry, including rhyme, meter, imagery, symbolism and diction. In addition to producing original works of poetry, students become proficient in examining, assessing, and critiquing published works of poetry by established writers. All creative materials produced by students will receive critiques in class workshops. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain and exhibit an understanding of the basic tenets of poetry, including but not limited to imagery, diction and syntax, sound, rhythm, form, figurative langue, voice, tone and structure, and research. 2. Identify types of poetry; poetry terminology; versification; and poetic forms, and successfully demonstrate a knowledge of these characteristics by developing them within students' own writing. 3. Analyze professional and student texts, recognizing areas where writers successfully exhibit technique as well as where writers need improvement. 4. Participate in collaborative learning by utilizing a conventional creative writing workshop model. 5. Perform investigative, immersional, and/or observational research, focus relevant details, and integrate research into the creative voice. 6. Investigate and partake in the process of publication, including journal research, query letters, and submissions. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher); and ENGL 2140R (Grade C or higher). SP.

ENGL 3142. Creative Nonfiction Writing. 3 Hours.

Provides students with the opportunity to improve their understanding of creative non-fiction writing techniques. The course will familiarize students with the subgenres (memoir, personal essays, nature essays, literary journalism, lyric essays and travelogue) beneath the umbrella of literary nonfiction and reinforce the relationship between nonfiction writing and the techniques used by fiction writers and poets. Because in all subgenres of literary nonfiction the author must relate to primary and secondary materials, students will also master the ability to juggle such demands in their own writing. The course will center on two kinds of texts - those by well-known, professional writers, and those produced by students themselves. All creative materials produced by students will receive critiques in class workshops. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Engage in the practices that professional writers regularly employ, such as finding markets, crafting query letters, and communicating directly with editors. 2. Investigate the business aspects of freelance writing. 3. Critique materials produced for class by peers, providing suggestions for effective revision. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) and ENGL 2140R (Grade C or higher). FA.

ENGL 3145. The Creative Writing Portfolio. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursuing an emphasis in Creative Writing as well as students pursuing the Creative Writing minor; open to other interested students. Students compile work produced in core courses offered through the Creative Writing emphasis, among them ENGL 2140R: Introduction to Creative Writing, ENGL 3140: Fiction Writing, ENGL 3141: Poetry Writing and ENGL 3142: Creative Nonfiction. Using rubrics and theory-driven texts as well as technical guidelines articulated by the instructor, students workshop, revise and compile creative material simultaneously for peers in the immediate class setting and for audiences outside the University community, e.g. graduate programs, literary journals and employers in the publishing industry. Students assemble work for an electronic portfolio. Students produce an extensive statement that addresses the aesthetic and/or rhetorical objectives of the creative work they have gathered, the intended audience of these pieces and the broadened understanding of craft and technique that has resulted from the rigorous revision strategies the course requires. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Organize creative writing ePortfolios for presentation to groups outside of the undergraduate setting, such as graduate school admissions committees and employers in the publishing industry. 2. Employ effective workshop strategies to help peers enhance both their creative work and the manner in which they present it for review. 3. Analyze different editorial policies and practices of creative writing publications. 4. Synthesize theoretical claims, experience-based findings and personal beliefs about aesthetics and rhetoric to produce a manifesto on creative literary production. 5. Use technology to successfully create an ePortfolio for academic and professional advancement. Prerequisites: ENGL 2140R, and any three of the following: ENGL 3030, ENGL 3340, ENGL 3140, ENGL 3141, ENGL 3142, ENGL 3360, MDIA 3620, THEA 3420, ENGL 4140 (all Grade C or higher). FA.

ENGL 3180. Writing for Interactive Media. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursuing an emphasis in Professional & Technical Writing, and open to other interested students. Explores writing and editing for visual, audio, and interactive media--how to choose appropriate format and delivery mechanisms for news, Web sites, kiosks, and CD/DVD, etc. Topics include accessibility, copyright law and information ethics. Students will understand differences in writing for linear and non-linear media; develop an audience-focused, communication-oriented approach to writing; and create text-based documents that communicate effectively across different media. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the writer's role in the development of multimedia and interactive programs. 2. Analyze media scripting methods and build scripts designed for interactive applications. 3. Compose and design a multimedia production project that communicates effectively across different platforms. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). FA.

ENGL 3201. Genre Studies: Folklore. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Genre Studies requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. Provides an understanding of folklore as a genre, as well as folk themes and motifs in other forms of literature. Focuses on folklore in novels and stories and on folk narratives themselves. Designed to introduce methods and practices of folklore field research and folklore criticism. Also designed to expand the student's critical reading and writing skills. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and discuss (through class discussions and written assignments) folklore traditions of Western and Eastern Europe, Russia, India, Siberia, Egypt, Japan, China, Iceland, Brazil, Turkey, plus be familiar with Native American folklore and traditions and Yiddish folklore. 2. Examine historical events that influenced the narratives. 3. Report connections between history and its reflections and interpretations as preserved in folk and fairy tales. 4. Label, analyze, and explain the issues of gender, social organization, and religion as represented in the folk traditions. 5. List basic structural and functional elements of folklore as a genre. 6. Differentiate between the oral and literary traditions within folklore. 7. Name types of folk stories. 8. Assess existing research and criticism and synthesize primary and secondary sources to support original arguments about the texts read. Prerequisites: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3202. Genre Studies: Poetry. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Genre Studies requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. Covers the rudiments of poetic expression, including word choice, syntax, figuration, rhythm and meter, lineation, sound, imagery, and form, as it engages students with representative examples of poetry from the western and world traditions. Through close readings and analysis, students learn to appreciate the artistic value of language and to produce competent and convincing interpretations of poetry. Also covers various theoretical and critical perspectives as they influence the reading of poetry. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and explain the various elements that constitute poetry as a genre, such as rhyme, theme, tropes, setting, and so on. 2. Analyze and critique a specific literary text in a meaningful and effective fashion, doing far more than stating the obvious. 3. Evaluate and assess the insights of scholarly criticism pertaining to the primary texts read in the class. 4. Synthesize primary and secondary sources to support original arguments about the texts read. 5. Create connections, both verbal and written, between the major literary, philosophical, social, and historical issues covered in the poetry and the course as a whole. 6. Identify the major authors covered in the course and investigate the significance of their works in relation to each other and the contexts created in the course. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3203. Genre Studies: Novels. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Genre Studies requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. Students will explore in depth aspects of the novel, such as plot, theme, character, setting, etc. Novels will be selected according to time, place, period, or theme. Students will be introduced to research and criticism as well as to the texts themselves. Also designed to expand the student's critical reading and writing skills. Students will write several critical assignments and conduct a major research project. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe novel as a genre, including various aspects of the novel such as plot, theme, character, setting, and so on. 2. Examine how the novel has evolved with the modern world, and how the two have shaped and mirrored each other. 3. Assess the primary texts within their historical and cultural contexts. 4. Apply the insights of critics to the texts read. 5. Examine and Synthesize primary and secondary sources to support original arguments about the texts read. 6. Identify major literary, philosophical, social, and historical issues in the novels. 7. Name the major authors and demonstrate the significance of their works inside and outside the cultures discussed. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3211. Period Studies: Victorian Lit. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Period / Topic Studies requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. Students will engage with the works and ideas of major writers of the period, such as Browning, Tennyson, Arnold, Swinburne, Dickens, Thackeray, Carlyle, and Ruskin, including their historical and cultural contexts. Successful students will demonstrate skill in reading different types of literature, in understanding narrative and figurative devices in using a variety of critical perspectives based on literary theory, and in sharing what they understand through both written and oral discussion. Provides opportunities for developing greater skill in the critical reading and appreciation of literature. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the importance and relevance of Victorian authors, themes, tropes, and genres. 2. Analyze individual literary works through written and oral responses. 3. Explain how Victorian writers have and continue to exert historical, social and political influence on British, American, and world culture. 4. Evaluate relevant scholarly sources and significant critical research covering Victorian literature. 5. Create publishable quality scholarly writing which synthesizes current research with student's original ideas in relevant area of Victorian literature and studies. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3212. Period/Topic: Crime Fiction & Film Noir. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Period / Topic Studies requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other students who wish to learn about the "hard boiled" school of detective fiction and the influence it has had upon American cinema. Introduces themes, motifs and other narrative elements that distinguish the novels of Depression-era crime writers like Dashiell Hammett, James M. Cain, and Raymond Chandler. Students will analyze cinematic adaptations of these authors' works, especially those which have been cited by critics as examples of film noir. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Use concise and precise language in their writing; write with correct usage and punctuation; write thesis-driven analyses of published works. 2. Select words appropriate to their subject and audience, recognize the need for precise expression. 3. Adopt new hermeneutic strategies for interpreting cinematic and verbal texts; examine the links between American history and American popular culture. 4. Demonstrate the ability to use the MLA style of parenthetical documentation, bibliographic form, and research paper format; demonstrate the ability to synthesize research with their own ideas. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3213. Period/Topic Western Amer Lit. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Period/Topic Studies requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. Students will explore significant works of twentieth-century Western American literature. Students will write several critical assignments and conduct a major research project. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain and identify major forms, genres and themes found in Western American literature. 2. Analyze literary elements, including plot, setting, characterization, theme, point of view, figurative language and other literary devices. 3. Evaluate myths and ideologies (e.g. American exceptionalism, the American Dream, freedom, equal opportunity) from a Western regional perspective. 4. Create high quality researched essays that critically investigate the relations between American history and culture and regional literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3214. Period/Topic Studies: Realism/Modernism. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Period / Topic Studies requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. Students will engage with the work and ideas of major realist and/or modernist writers, such as Austen, Eliot, Dickens, Conrad, Woolf, Hemingway, and Faulkner. Students will be expected to read extensive amounts of work, write several critical assignments, conduct a major research project, and take at least two exams. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the importance and relevance of realist/modernist authors, themes, tropes, and genres. 2. Analyze individual literary works through written and oral responses. 3. Explain how realist/modernist writers have and continue to exert historical, social and political influence on British, American, and world culture. 4. Evaluate relevant scholarly sources and significant critical research covering realist/modernist literature. 5. Create publishable quality scholarly writing which synthesizes current research with student's original ideas in relevant area of realist/modernist literature and studies. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3215. Period/Topic Studies: Gender in Literature. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Period / Topic Studies requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. Focuses on major theories and debates regarding gender and ramifications of gender delineations, explores definitions of the masculine as well as the feminine, and examines the function of conventional gender roles in primary literary as well as theoretical texts. Although gender will be the primary lens, includes analysis of race, class, ethnicity, social identity, and the intersections among these categories. Students will be expected to read extensive amounts of work, write several critical assignments, conduct a major research project, and take at least two exams. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Investigate the idea of gender development and reinforcement in a supportive, though challenging, environment through literature, by reading and examining a variety of works which might be designated as such. 2. Analyze and critique, through both verbal and written avenues, a specific literary text in a meaningful and effective fashion, doing far more than stating the obvious, while also synthesizing primary and secondary sources to support original arguments about the texts read. 3. Investigate how socio-cultural factors influence authors whom either consciously or unconsciously engage gender concepts in their writing. 4. Examine and critique intersections of gender with other cultural elements such as race/ethnicity, class, sexuality, gender performance, age, and/or able-bodiedness. 5. Encounter and discuss primary theoretical texts within the discipline of gender studies. 6. Develop and use a vocabulary for discussing the rhetoric of gender as found in literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3216. Depictions of the Holocaust in Literature & Film. 3 Hours.

Suggested for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies and anyone interested in exploring the links between a historical moment--the Holocaust--and numerous creative works that have been developed in response to it, including memoir, novels, short stories, poetry, and film. Introduces themes, motifs and other narrative elements that distinguish novels, memoirs, and motion pictures produced since 1945, the year the Nazi death camps were discovered and liberated. Authors studied will include Elie Wiesel, Charlotte Delbo, Primo Levi, Thomas Keneally, Hannah Arendt, and Tadeusz Borowski. The course will also consider the ethical challenges that arise around the Holocaust and its depictions, addressing commercial novels, television productions, and motion pictures, such as The Book Thief, Holocaust, and Schindler's List, which critics have charged with exploiting human suffering for profit. Course offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Create written work that meets the professional standards of academic writing in the fields of literary and cinematic studies. 2. Make connections between their own thinking and writing and the work of secondary scholars. 3. Effectively communicate their ideas orally and in writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3220. Multicultural Literature in the United States. 3 Hours.

Required of all English majors, and open to other interested students. Examines multicultural literature by American authors and studies the contributions to American literature by African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans. Focuses on novels, short stories, essays, and poetry that examine the social construction of race in American society, the construction of American identity, and the intersections of race, class, and gender. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and explain major forms, genres and themes found in multicultural American literature. 2. Analyze literary elements, including plot, setting, characterization, theme, point of view, figurative language and other literary devices. 3. Analyze the "myths of America" (e.g. acculturation, assimilation, language and ethnic identity) from minority points of view. 4. Create high quality researched essays on topics that pertain to multicultural American experiences in selected literature. 5. Evaluate the importance of a multicultural focus in both American literature and American culture. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). FA.

ENGL 3230. Literature and Culture. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies, and open to other students curious about the relationship between the literary arts and other cultural forms. This interdisciplinary course exposes students to a broad selection of American literary, cinematic, artistic, and cultural works that investigate the relationship between American culture and literature. Students will be introduced to the ways in which texts and artifacts are closely tied to the geographical and cultural space as well as the historical period in which they emerge. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain and identify major forms, genres and themes found in American literature. 2. Analyze literary elements, including plot, setting, characterization, theme, point of view, figurative language and other literary devices. 3. Evaluate myths and ideologies (e.g. American exceptionalism, the American Dream, freedom, equal opportunity) from a cultural criticism point of view. 4. Create high quality researched essays that critically investigate the relations between American culture and literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA.

ENGL 3260. Major American Authors. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Major Authors requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. In depth exploration of the work of a major writer or group of writers. Topics and time periods vary among American authors according to instructor expertise and might include, for example, Jefferson, Douglass, Melville, Dickinson, Cather, Hemingway, Silko, or Morrison, among others. Emphasizes the dynamic interplay among the aesthetics of the text(s), the author's life, and the socio-political context in which the works are produced. Students will be expected to read extensive amounts of work from these authors, write several critical assignments, and conduct a major research project. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the importance and scope of the major author(s) covered in the course. 2. Analyze important individual literary works through written and oral responses. 3. Create unique and insightful claims about how writers and works have and continue to exert influence on specific national or regional literature and culture. 4. Synthesize relevant scholarly sources with the student's own original ideas in a balanced manner (quotations, paraphrases, and summaries fit nicely with paragraph main ideas and topic sentences) and create unique scholarly work. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3261. Major Authors: Major American Women Authors. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Major Authors requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. In depth exploration of the work of a major woman writer or group of women writers. Topics and time periods may vary according to instructor expertise. Emphasizes the dynamic interplay among the aesthetics of the text(s), the authors' lives, and the socio-political context in which the works are produced. Students will be expected to read extensive amounts of work from these authors, write several critical assignments, and conduct a major research project. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze and explore the unique contributions of women authors to the literary canon. 2. Link the chosen women authors to their major works and trace thematic elements that run through each authors' oeuvre of work. 3. Analyze, connect, and assess common themes specific to female writers throughout a breadth of time, experience, and place and begin to investigate how these themes both reflected and created social change. 4. Explore how the chosen literary texts are engaging with recognizable literary tropes, themes, styles, periods, and accoutrements of literary narrative and writing. 5. Analyze and critique a specific literary text in a meaningful and effective fashion, doing far more than stating the obvious. 6. Evaluate and assess the insights of scholarly criticism pertaining to the primary texts read in the class. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3262. Major Authors: Major African American Authors. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Major Authors requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. In depth exploration of the works of a major African American writer or a group of major African American writers. Topics and time periods may vary according to instructor expertise. Emphasize the dynamic interplay among the aesthetics of the text(s), the authors' lives, and the socio-political context in which the works are produced. Students will be expected to read extensive amounts of work from these authors, write several critical assignments, and conduct a major research project. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the importance and influence of the major author(s) covered in the course. 2. Analyze important themes located in individual literary works through written and oral responses. 3. Create unique and insightful claims about how writers and works have and continue to exert influence on literature and culture. 4. Analyze relevant scholarly sources with the student's own original ideas in a balanced manner (quotations, paraphrases, and summaries fit nicely with paragraph main ideas and topic sentences) and Create unique scholarly arguments. 5. Examine the role of African American literature in the larger context of American and world culture. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3270. Major British Authors. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Major Authors requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. In-depth exploration of the work of a major writer or group of writers. Topics and time periods vary among British authors according to instructor expertise. Emphasizes the dynamic interplay among the aesthetics of the text(s) and the socio-political context in which the works are produced. Students will be expected to read extensive amounts of work from these authors, write several critical assignments, conduct a major research project, and take at least two exams. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the importance and scope of the major author(s) covered in the course. 2. Analyze important individual literary works through written and oral responses. 3. Create unique and insightful claims about how writers and works have and continue to exert influence on specific national or regional literature and culture. 4. Synthesize relevant scholarly sources with the student's own original ideas in a balanced manner (quotations, paraphrases, and summaries fit nicely with paragraph main ideas and topic sentences) and create unique scholarly work. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3271. Major British Authors: Milton. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Major Authors requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. In depth exploration of the works of John Milton. Particular works may vary according to instructor expertise. Emphasizes the dynamic interplay among the aesthetics of the text(s), the author's life, and the socio-political context in which the works were produced. Students will be expected to read extensive amounts of work from these authors, write several critical assignments, and conduct a major research project. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Investigate and evaluate themes and genres common to John Milton. 2. Analyze elements of fiction/poetry/prose in the context of Milton's major works and his historical period. 3. Explain, identify, and then synthesize John Milton's contributions to intellectual and literary development. 4. Analyze and critique a specific literary text in a meaningful and effective fashion, doing far more than stating the obvious. 5. Evaluate and assess the insights of scholarly criticism pertaining to the primary texts read in the class. 6. Synthesize primary and secondary sources to support original arguments about the texts read. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3280. Major World Authors. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Major Authors requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. In-depth exploration of the work of a major writer or group of writers. Topics and time periods may vary according to instructor expertise. Emphasizes the dynamic interplay among the aesthetics of the texts, the authors' lives, and the socio-political context in which the works are produced. Students will be expected to read extensive amounts of work from selected authors, write several critical assignments, and conduct a major research project. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the importance and influence of the major author(s) covered in the course. 2. Analyze important themes located in individual literary works through written and oral responses. 3. Create unique and insightful claims about how writers and works have and continue to exert influence on literature and culture. 4. Analyze relevant scholarly sources with the student's own original ideas in a balanced manner (quotations, paraphrases, and summaries fit nicely with paragraph main ideas and topic sentences) and Create unique scholarly arguments. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3281. Major World Authors: Postcolonial. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a Major Authors requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. In depth exploration of the works of postcolonial writers. Particular works may vary according to instructor expertise. Emphasizes the dynamic interplay among the aesthetics of the text(s), the authors' lives, and the socio-political context in which the works were produced. Students will be expected to read extensive amounts of work from these authors, write several critical assignments, and conduct a major research project. Course offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain and identify major forms, genres and themes found in the selection of major world authors. 2. Analyze literary elements, including plot, setting, characterization, theme, point of view, figurative language and other literary devices. 3. Describe the historical and cultural contexts of the literature discussed. 4. Evaluate the texts against the backdrop of their cultural and historical contexts. 5. Create high quality researched essays on topics that pertain to the major authors in the selected world literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3340. Exploring Scientific Writing. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Professional & Technical Writing, and open to other interested students. Focuses on rhetorical principles that influence writing in scientific professions. Students will study the writings of influential scientists-rhetoricians. Successful completers will demonstrate through theory and application an understanding of these principles through these types of scientific writing: environmental impact statements, the scientific report, and articles from contemporary scientific journals. Students also will examine current controversies in scientific debate. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze scientific documents to determine rhetorical strategies and effectiveness. 2. Apply rhetorical strategies to write scientific discourse. 3. Synthesize research with their own ideas and writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). SP (even).

ENGL 3341. Studies in Writing, Rhetoric, and Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Professional & Technical Writing, and open to other interested students. Focuses on historical and contemporary connections between rhetoric and composition pedagogies, including emphasis on rhetoricians and theorists in compositional theory from classical to contemporary. Successful completers will be able to describe major trends in rhetoric and composition theory, connect composition theory to originating theorists, and analyze compositions for rhetorical techniques. Students will create a teaching portfolio or compose a conference-ready research paper in composition studies. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the origins of rhetoric and composition theories. 2. Analyze the rhetoric in representative compositions. 3. Synthesize research in composition studies. 4. Demonstrate composition skills appropriate to audience and purpose. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). SP (odd).

ENGL 3342. The Rhetoric of Gender. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a major requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Professional & Technical Writing, and open to other interested students. Focuses on major theories and debates regarding the rhetoric of gender. Explores definitions of the masculine as well as the feminine and examines the function of conventional gender roles in social and literary communication practices. Although gender will be the primary lens for analysis, we will also analyze race, class, ethnicity, social identity, and the intersections among these categories. Students will write several critical assignments and conduct a major research project. Course offered in rotation, check class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the intersectionality of gender, race, class, and other hierarchical systems. 2. Analyze communication artifacts (e.g., movies, novels, short stories, advertisements) in terms of rhetoric and gender theory. 3. Compose rhetorical research in gender studies with an understanding of key concepts in the rhetoric of gender. Prerequisite: ENG 2010 (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 3350. Digital Journal Production. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Professional & Technical Writing and Creative Writing, and is open to other interested students. Through the production of a digital journal, students gain understanding of how written communication applies to such organizational contexts as media, business, professional, social, educational, and political groups. Successful students will understand how writing functions in basic types of organizations, critique the effectiveness of written organizational communication practices, and develop their own writing and editing skills. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Understand and apply the basic tenets of editing and journal production, including but not limited to web development, copy editing, layout and document design, and research. 2. Apply professional and technical writing skills to compose marketing and publicity materials as well as informational documents, email, solicitations, social media, and websites. 3. Meet deadlines and practice professionalism in dealing with campus and community entities. 4. Analyze various undergraduate literary journals for content and aesthetic considerations. 5. Participate in collaborative learning by working with journal staff members and other interns. 6. Perform investigative and/or observational research, focus relevant details, and integrate research into journals' websites, publications, and publicity materials. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA.

ENGL 3360. Writing Magazines Trade Jrnls. 3 Hours.

Fulfills a requirement for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Professional & Technical Writing, and open to other interested students. Successful completers will be able to understand the development of the magazine market and the current landscape of magazine publishing: generate ideas, pitch stories, research, report and write articles suitable for publication in a magazine; and initiate and complete the feature or long-form article for magazines or other markets. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Investigate practices that professional writers regularly employ, such as finding markets, crafting query letters, and communicating directly with editors. 2. Evaluate business aspects of freelance writing. 3. Analyze materials produced for class by colleagues, providing suggestions for effective revision. 4. Devise strategies for obtaining writing assignments by meeting with professional writers in the local community and by using current technology to reach out to writers, editors, and publishers nationally and internationally. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). FA.

ENGL 3400. World Literature (ALCI). 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. Examines works by major authors in various genres from Asia, the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent, Africa, the Caribbean, Australia, Latin America, and Europe, thus enabling students to appreciate culture and literary traditions beyond those of Britain and the United States. Course topics will vary according to instructor emphasis. This course is designated as an Active Learning Cultural Immersion (ALCI) course. Students have a unique opportunity to learn another culture as part of the learning objectives of this course. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze literary elements found in the world literature texts - including plot, setting, characterization, theme, point of view, figurative language and other literary devices - in both written and verbal forms. 2. Identify and then investigate major forms, genres, and themes found in world literature texts, both western and non-western. 3. Analyze and critique a specific literary text in a meaningful and effective fashion, doing far more than stating the obvious. 4. Evaluate and assess the insights of scholarly criticism pertaining to the primary texts read in the class. 5. Synthesize primary and secondary sources to support original arguments about the texts read. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). SP.

ENGL 3450. Methods and Research in Professional and Technical Writing. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursuing an emphasis in Professional and Technical Writing, and open to other interested students. Introduces students to the foundations of technical communication theory and research methods in the workplace. Explores contemporary issues related to professional writing contexts, including digital composition, ethics, gender, etc. Students will compose a literature review for a research proposal and develop and revise a professional eportfolio to archive professional documents. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe contemporary issues and writing practices in the industry, academia, government, and other organizations based on effective professional/technical writing principles. 2. Assess research articles critically based on goals, methods, theories. 3. Design a research proposal that synthesizes a body of published research on a particular issue. 4. Compose a professional eportfolio that effectively tracks individual scholarly and professional development. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). FA.

ENGL 3510. Shakespeare. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies or English Education, and open to other interested students. Students can expect to do close readings of at least six plays and to study such secondary materials as literary criticism, historical background, and film and theatrical representations of the plays. As perhaps the single most important cultural icon in our society, Shakespeare also offers an excellent opportunity to look at the nature of literary reputations, national competitiveness in cultures, and the shifting map of such issues over time. Students will learn to incorporate these materials into their own class discussions and will also produce papers and take exams that reflect their new knowledge. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the characters, settings, plots, etc. of nine plays. 2. Apply literary criticism, historical background, and film and theatrical representations of the plays to introduce and support (through class discussions and written assignments) original arguments about Shakespeare's works. 3. Investigate and debate the nature of literary reputations, national competitiveness in cultures, and the shifting map of such issues over time using the works of Shakespeare. 4. Examine the plays by decoding Shakespeare's images and being able to fit his works into literary, historical, cultural, aesthetic, philosophical, or political contexts. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). SP.

ENGL 3520. Young Adult Literature. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursuing an emphasis in English Education, and open to other interested students. In depth exploration of contemporary adolescent literature, including content, structure, diversity issues, and critical evaluation. Also designed to provide strategies for teaching young adult readers. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze orally and in written form literary aspects of young adult literature including plot, setting, characterization, theme, point of view, and figurative language. 2. Compare and differentiate the characteristics of quality vs. subpar young adult literature. 3. Critically evaluate works of young adult literature in order to select the best literature to engage and meet the needs of young adults. 4. Investigate current issues and trends in young adult literature and formulate informed personal positions regarding these issues and trends. 5. Develop strategies for teaching young adult literature to young readers. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). SP.

ENGL 3600. Literary Theory. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursuing an emphasis in Literary Studies, and open to other interested students. Covers the major branches of contemporary literary theory. Theoretical perspectives will include structuralism, reader-oriented theory, feminist theory, new historicist and materialist critique, post-colonialist critique, and deconstruction. Topics may also include foundational problems such as canonicity, class, consumerism, gender, ideology, race, sexuality, and textuality. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1.Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of literary theories, methodologies and accompanying discourses. 2. Create insightful responses to various literary and critical texts through specific theoretical lenses. 3. Evaluate and analyze the most appropriate critical approaches as they apply to important literary and cultural artifacts. 4. Apply the techniques of effective collaboration through successful completion of various group activities. Prerequisites: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher); AND ENGL 2600 (Grade C or higher). FA.

ENGL 3720. Editing. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursuing an emphasis in Professional and Technical Writing, and open to other interested students. Students learn to work productively with other people's print and online documents, using specialized vocabulary and such editing tools and proofreaders' marks, style guides, and standard editorial reference material. Also, students practice how to identify and correct common problems. Includes copy editing, the study of style manuals, and an overview of the production process. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain editing's role in document development and publication. 2. Edit effectively on a range of editing tasks and documents. 3. Implement an editing plan that meets a client's rhetorical needs and expectations. 4. Report strategies to enhance collaboration with peers and with clients. Prerequisites: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher), AND ENGL 1410 (Grade C or higher). FA.

ENGL 3810. History and Structure of the English Language. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors and recommended for other students interested in the ways English has developed over time. Explores the origins and evolution of the English language by focusing on social, political, and linguistic developments over time through the Old, Middle and Early Modern periods and into the present. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Categorize the differences in language among the periods of English history. 2. Describe various events and people influential in the course of English history. 3. Discuss the forces that propel languages to international prominence. 4. Name various linguists/writers/educators/lexicographers who were important in the study of Indo-European languages and assess their contributions. 5. Explain the processes by which languages change. 6. Debate with your classmates on topics related to language development. 7. Construct individual and/or group (research) projects that investigate specific areas of knowledge about the development of the English language. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

ENGL 3890R. Journal Pub/Southern Quill. 1-3 Hours.

For students in all disciplines who wish to work with The Southern Quill, Dixie State University's literary magazine, and who want to pursue projects in creative writing such as poetry, short stories, plays, and essays. The upper division version of this class will be for students who serve as chief editors and who will be responsible for establishing editorial policies, advertising, and managing the overall production of the magazine. Students must lead weekly "Southern Quill"meetings. Variable credit: 1.0 - 3.0. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Understand and apply the basic tenets of editing and journal production, including but not limited to web development, copy editing, layout and document design, and research. 2. Apply professional and technical writing skills to compose marketing and publicity materials as well as informational documents, email, solicitations, social media, and websites. 3. Meet deadlines and practice professionalism in dealing with campus and community entities. 4. Analyze various undergraduate literary journals for content and aesthetic considerations. 5. Participate in collaborative learning by working with journal staff members and other interns. 6. Perform investigative and/or observational research, focus relevant details, and integrate research into journals' websites, publications, and publicity materials. 7. Investigate and partake in the process of publication, including journal research. Prerequisite: Instructor permission required. SP.

ENGL 4140. Advanced Fiction Technique. 3 Hours.

Fulfills an elective requirement for the Creative Writing emphasis. Suggested for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Creative Writing and anyone interested in exploring advanced fictional storytelling technique. Invites students to build upon foundational understanding of plot structure, characterization, dialogue, and symbolism introduced and developed in ENGL 2140: Creative Writing and ENGL 3140: Fiction Writing. Types of narrative strategies, modes, and forms analyzed and practiced during the course will be determined according to instructor expertise and may include the graphic novel, horror and fantasy, crime fiction, flash fiction, among others. Students will read, research, and discuss published narrative models at length to improve their understanding of the conventions, the history, and the practitioners associated with the forms and modes they are learning to produce. Students will craft original fiction and critical analyses of assigned readings and conduct a major research project. Course offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Learn new methods for critiquing and responding to peers' work. 2. Read exemplary works of published fiction and use these narratives as models for their own stories. 3. Craft creative material that employs the basic elements of narrative, such as plot, dialogue, characterization, and symbol. 4. Critique materials produced for class by peers, providing suggestions for effective revision. Prerequisite: ENGL 2140 (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 4141. Advanced Poetry Writing. 3 Hours.

Fulfills an elective requirement for the Creative Writing emphasis. Suggested for English majors pursuing an emphasis in Creative Writing and anyone interested in exploring the craft of poetry writing in greater depth. Invites students to build upon foundational understanding of poetic forms and modes, figurative language, imagery, and sound devices acquired in ENGL 2140R: Creative Writing and ENGL 3141: Poetry Writing. The specific approach to poetic craft and the texts analyzed during the course will be determined according to instructor expertise and may include the poetic sequence, received forms, persona, and ekphrasis, among others. Students will read, research, and discuss published models at length to improve their understanding of the conventions, the history, and the practitioners associated with the forms and modes they are learning to produce. Course offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Develop greater facility in the close reading of poems. 2. Refine ability to use specific, literary terms in the context of literary analysis. 3. Improve revision strategies and process work in the composition of poems through focus on the writing workshop method. 4. Improve specific elements of poetic craft, such as precise diction, imagery, figurative language, and line breaks. 5. Compose and revise a sequence of poems that may be used toward a publishable chapbook or graduate school applications. Prerequisite: ENGL 2140R or ENGL 3141 (Grade C or higher).

ENGL 4500. Methods of Teaching Writing. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursing an emphasis in English Education. Students will learn how to design and assess writing assignments. They will also explore different pedagogical strategies and theoretical concepts about writing instruction, including adaptive teaching for diverse learners. Public school practicum required. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply knowledge of English Language Arts subject matter to the teaching of writing. 2. Compose lesson plans and assessments for creating texts (including oral, written, and/or visual) to promote learning for all students. 3. Plan research-based instruction that increases student motivation and active student engagement, builds sustained learning of English Language Arts, and responds to diverse students' context-based needs. Prerequisites: English Education major; AND Admission to the Dixie State University Secondary Education Teaching program; or Instructor permission. FA.

ENGL 4510. Methods of Teaching Literature. 3 Hours.

Required of English majors pursing an emphasis in English Education, and recommended for others interested in teaching literature to young adult learners. Students will learn how to teach a variety of literary genres from diverse writers. They will also explore different pedagogical strategies and theoretical approaches to literature instruction. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply knowledge of English Language Arts subject matter to the teaching of literature. 2. Create lesson plans and assessments for reading and the study of literature to promote learning for all students. 3. Plan research-based instruction that increases student motivation and active student engagement, builds sustained learning of English Language Arts, and responds to diverse students' context-based needs. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher) or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). SP.

ENGL 4700. Senior Capstone (ALUR). 3 Hours.

Required of all English majors. Must be taken in the student's senior year, preferably during the final semester. Asks students to synthesize and reflect on their learning and experience in the major, allowing them to integrate their study of literature, writing, and theory as well as examine the discipline of English itself. Also, asks students to look forward to careers and/or graduate school, and may include guest speakers, previous English majors, and others who discuss career and graduate school options. Includes a series of culminating assessment projects, including a senior thesis aimed at measuring student outcomes and at assisting the department to improve its program. This course is designated as an Active Learning Undergraduate Research (ALUR) course. Students will conduct an inquiry or investigation that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Examine and reflect upon significant past educational experiences to inform current learning and understanding. 2. Compile a representative collection of high quality work from throughout their academic career. 3. Design and effectively deliver a public presentation based on original scholarship. 4. Propose and create a thoroughly researched major piece of original professional quality written scholarship. 5. Implement collaborative approaches to research and writing through participation in extensive workshop opportunities with peers. Prerequisites: English major; AND Senior standing; AND Instructor permission. FA, SP.

ENGL 4890R. English Internship. 1-3 Hours.

For students who are granted and accept an internship that provides an extensive learning experience in the field of English. Internships offer students the opportunity to work with government, a nonprofit agency, a private agency, an employer, or an instructor. Through arrangements with the department chair, a student may earn up to 3 credits per semester for satisfactory completion of terms of the internship. Students must be supervised by an agency representative and/or a faculty advisor. Written contracts must be completed and signed. Students are also required to submit a written evaluation of their experience before the end of the semester. Approval from chair of English department required before enrolling. Variable Credit: 1.0 - 3.0 Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Offered by arrangement. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Compose informational documents (print and/or digital) for the organization/company that follows proper technical communication principles. 2. Build data from projects and/or activities for documentation and assessment to advance the mission statement of the organization/company. 3. Assess skills learned during the internship by submitting a midterm and final portfolio. Prerequisite: Advanced standing; AND Instructor permission.

ENGL 6400. Advanced Editing. 3 Hours.

Advanced practice in editing technical documents. Focuses on working with clients to create user-friendly documents, especially changing technical language into audience-appropriate, inclusive language, integrating visuals (photos, drawings, graphs, diagrams, animation, and charts), and using design to enhance audience understanding. Required for the M.A. in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Rewrite technical language into user-friendly and inclusive language. 2. Edit technical documents on a variety of platforms using appropriate software such as Word and Photoshop. 3. Integrate photographs, drawings, diagrams, animation, and charts to increase users' understanding of technical documents. 4. Devise audience-aware documents that demonstrate a strong command of grammar, syntax, diction, writing conventions, and design. Prerequisites: Admission into the graduate program in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric.

ENGL 6401. Research Methods in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

Survey of research methods that apply to contemporary practices in technical writing and digital rhetoric. Explores contemporary issues and studies related to TWDR contexts, including usability studies, technorhetoric, rhetorical function of networks, digital theorization of agency, etc. Required for the M.A. in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate research critically based on its goals, methods, and/or theories. 2. Apply principles of effective technical writing and digital rhetoric to the analysis of contemporary issues and practices in the industry, academe, government, and other organizations. 3. Evaluate a range of research designs used to address particular research questions. 4. Synthesize a body of published research on a particular issue and design a proposal. Prerequisite: Admission into the graduate program in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric.

ENGL 6402. Critical Theories in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

An introduction to rhetorical theories and controversies in the field of technical writing and digital rhetoric. Explores theoretical approaches and critical issues in workplace settings, including histories, ethical praxis, user-centered design practices, writing across cultures, interdisciplinary boundaries, writing/working in digital environments, etc. Required for the M.A. in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze foundational theories and concepts in rhetoric. 2. Demonstrate knowledge of rhetorical concepts by applying them to contemporary issues in workplace settings. 3. Employ rhetorical theories in argumentation tactics in technical writing and digital rhetoric. 4. Contrast theoretical approaches to disciplinary, cultural, and environmental issues and contexts. Prerequisite: Admission into the graduate program in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric.

ENGL 6460. Special Topics in Digital Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

A Special Topics in Digital Rhetoric course provides MA students with the opportunity to investigate a wide range of topics in digital rhetoric that students will encounter and compose within. This course will explore theories and foundations for digital rhetoric, exploring models of digital rhetoric and how these digital artifacts are rhetorically composed. Topics vary. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze digital rhetoric theories. 2. Practice with technologies and literacies connected with digital rhetoric theories. 3. Apply digital rhetoric to workplace communication. 4. Develop researched presentations individually and collaboratively. 5. Compose written, digitally-based final projects. Prerequisite: Admission into the graduate program in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric.

ENGL 6470. Special Topics in Writing Technologies. 3 Hours.

A Special Topics in Writing Technologies course provides MA students with the opportunity to encounter a wide range of writing technologies within technical and professional writing. This course will survey particular writing technologies with a focus on how these technologies originated, how they function in a professional and technical setting, and how they impact stakeholders and audiences. Topics vary. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze various technologies and mediums used for communication. 2. Determine community needs for communication through technological mediums. 3. Employ varied technological software. 4. Create documentation and communicate through various technologies for a client and/or stakeholder. 5. Devise usability studies for technological communication. Prerequisite: Admission into the graduate program in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric.

ENGL 6480. Special Topics in Technical Writing. 3 Hours.

Advanced writing and research in the field of technical writing in professional contexts. Topics vary. May focus on theories of effective design, usability testing, plain language, graphics use and design, editing for specific fields, or current trends. Produces technical documents suitable for multiplatform publication. Repeatable with different course content. Required for the M.A. in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply theory to research topics in technical writing. 2. Adapt content across platforms and media. 3. Produce technical artifacts through common software tools such as Dreamweaver, InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, HTML editors, PowerPoint, Word and Excel. 4. Devise audience-aware documents that demonstrate a strong command of grammar, syntax, diction, writing conventions, and design. Prerequisite: Admission into the graduate program in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric.

ENGL 6820. Practicum in Teaching College Composition. 3 Hours.

Introduction to teaching writing, designed specifically for Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) teaching in the English Department. Focuses on theory and practice of teaching writing, specifically ENGL 1010 and 2010, but also prepares graduate instructors for further teaching responsibilities. Required of new GTAs in English. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Create effective lesson plans for English 1010 and 2010. 2. Create effective assignments for English 1010 and 2010. 3. Rewrite syllabus and course materials from fall semester in preparation for spring semester. 4. Analyze and reflect on observations of the class of a seasoned instructor. 5. Create a teaching philosophy pertaining to the teaching of composition. 6. Analyze pedagogical and composition theories. 7. Develop teaching techniques and theories. 8. Design lesson plans that incorporate technology to support student learning. Prerequisite: Acceptance as a graduate teaching assistant for the English Department.

ENGL 6900. Professional Internship. 3 Hours.

Internship in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric provides MA students with on-the-job training as technical and digital writing practitioners. During this internship, students will perform tasks in a professional environment, regularly meet with a faculty mentor, exhibit a portfolio of job tasks, and reflect on the experience within the portfolio. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Negotiate a work plan and/or project with a business supervisor and faculty mentor. 2. Perform tasks designated in internship work plan and/or project. 3. Conduct regular meetings with business supervisor and faculty mentor. 4. Organize work materials into a portfolio. 5. Present portfolio and a summative reflection on the experience. Prerequisite: Must have at least 12 hours of graduate coursework credit in the technical writing and digital rhetoric degree to enroll.

ENGL 6920R. Directed Readings in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric. 1-3 Hours.

Individual study under supervision of a professor to pursue a special interest with more breadth and/or depth than traditional coursework offers. The primary purpose of this course is to prepare for a thesis, internship, and/or portfolio; however, the course may be taken for any reason. The program director will approve a contract devised between the student and professor. May be repeated up to 6 credits, but only 3 credits can be applied to MA requirements. Students writing a thesis must complete 3 credits of ENGL 6900. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Summarize the topic to be explored in a brief essay. 2. Plan a reading list with professor (and other advisors as needed) that explores a special interest with breadth and/or depth. 3. Justify the type(s) of work(s) to be submitted (e.g., exam, essay, annotated bibliography, literature review) and masterfully meet expectations according to professor assessment. 4. Apply new knowledge to short- and long-term academic and/or professional goals. Prerequisite: Admission into the graduate program in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric; and instructor permission required.

ENGL 6971. Professional Portfolio in Technical Writing and Digital Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

A digital compilation of significant work used to evaluate student performance and professional development. A master's portfolio demonstrates the academic and professional growth of a student in the TWDR program and may include student reflections, writing samples, professional projects, classroom examinations, bibliographies, etc. Must have at least 12 hours of graduate coursework credit in the technical writing and digital rhetoric degree to enroll in the class. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate one's academic and professional growth with selected artifacts and critical reflections based on TWDR's program learning outcomes. 2. Integrate user-centered designs and/or organization principles into digital portfolios. 3. Demonstrate basic, technological, and ethical literacies competent for entering the workforce or doctoral programs in rhetoric, technical communication, and related fields. Prerequisite: Must have at least 12 hours of graduate coursework credit in the technical writing and digital rhetoric degree to enroll.

ENGL 6972R. Master's Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

Supervised research that first focuses on preparing and formally proposing a viable research project (first semester), and then focuses on researching, writing, analyzing, and editing a well-focused thesis (second semester). Must take 3 or more credits over at least two semesters as approved by the graduate committee chair. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Propose a well-focused research project that investigates a current question or problem in technical writing and/or digital rhetoric. 2. Construct a literature review. 3. Employ ethical and rigorous research methods to conduct primary research for the thesis. 4. Analyze findings and thoroughly discuss their implications for technical writing and/or digital rhetoric. 5. Compose a quality thesis worthy of publication. 6. Defend the thesis to the graduate committee's satisfaction. Prerequisite: Must have at least 12 hours of graduate coursework credit in the technical writing and digital rhetoric degree to enroll; and have 3 credits of ENGL 6920R (Grade B or higher and/or can be enrolled concurrently).