Global Studies (GLS)

GLS 1010. Introduction to Global Studies. 3 Hours.

This course studies the interactions between states, societies, and cultures as they intensify their level of integration and cooperation in the building of global processes, institutions, markets, and culture. It achieves that objective by organizing course materials in a modular and interdisciplinary format, so that students receive a multi-disciplinary perspective of an issue of global relevance. The course will draw topics and content form varied disciplines, such as Political Science, History, Philosophy, Sociology, Humanities, Languages, and other relevant fields. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply interdisciplinary knowledge to understand and model responses to global issues. 2. Articulate connections of the local with the global. 3. Leverage discipline-specific knowledge with the study of cultures. 4. Analyze how local, notional, continental, and global forces shape economic growth, equality, use of natural resources, and national and local identities. SP.

GLS 2990. Seminar in Global Studies. 1-3 Hours.

A multi-disciplinary course that introduces students to bodies of knowledge, skills, and strategies that dissect the linkages between students' own lives with that of the people whose country is the focus of the course. Depending on credit hours attempted, the course will meet once a week, or more, during the semester. The participants will travel to a selected country for a full immersion experience. Students may engage in field observations, research, visits to culturally relevant sites, home stays, or service or service-learning activities. Pre-trip activities will include literary and academic readings in preparation for the field portion. Readings and lectures will aim to integrate on-site workshops, service, and cultural visits into a cohesive whole through active learning pedagogies. First, the Course must be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least fifteen contact hours of lab, research, full immersion activities, or lecture per credit hour offered; and third, it must include an academic project as credit is not given for attendance alone. This course may include standard lectures, international travel, service or service learning projects, domestic field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, simulations, observations, or other non-traditional instruction methods. For domestic travel, see instructor for additional travel costs that may apply. For international travel, see studyabroad.dixie.edu for additional travel costs that may apply. Repeatable up to 9 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Offered upon sufficient student enrollment. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify problems found in student's society of origin and/or host country following the Problem-Solving Analysis Protocol. 2. Collect and organize information via observation, literature review, or direct experience into a cohesive explanation of the current state of affairs in a particular issue observed while traveling abroad. 3. Compile information and experiences acquired during the field portion.

GLS 3000. Global Cultures Topics: [Topic]. 3 Hours.

Takes an in-depth theoretical and research-based approach to the study of a particular topic within Global Cultures. Topics vary. Repeatable, with different topics, with a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe how the topic connects to various geographic, historical, or conceptual frameworks. 2. Investigate the course theme through careful analysis of cultural artifacts. 3. Compose a well-researched, well-articulated argument about the subject of their choosing. Prerequisites: ENGL 2010 (Grade C+ or higher).

GLS 3100. Global Political Topics: [Topic]. 3 Hours.

Takes an in-depth theoretical and research-based approach to the study of a particular topic within Global Politics. Topics vary. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe how the topic connects to various geographic, historical, or conceptual frameworks. 2. Investigate the course theme through careful analysis of political viewpoints. 3. Compose a well-researched, well-articulated argument about the subject of their choosing. Prerequisites: English 2010 (Grade C or higher).

GLS 4990. Seminar in Global Studies. 1-3 Hours.

A multi-disciplinary course that deepen students' understanding of the linkages between students' own lives with that of the people whose country is the focus of the course. Depending on credit hours attempted, the course will meet once a week, or more, during the semester; then participants will travel to a selected country for a full immersion experience. Students may engage in field observations, research, visits to culturally relevant sites, home stays, or service and service learning activities. Pre-trip activities will include literary and academic readings in preparation for the field portion. Readings and lectures will aim to integrate on-site workshops, service, and cultural visits into a cohesive whole through active learning pedagogies. First, the Course must be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least fifteen contact hours of lab, research, full immersion activities, or lecture per credit-hour offered; and third, it must include an academic final project as credit is not given for attendance alone. This course may include standard lectures, international travel, service and service-learning projects, domestic field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, simulations, observations, or other non-traditional instruction methods. For domestic travel, see instructor for additional travel costs that may apply. For international travel, see studyabroad.dixie.edu for additional travel costs that may apply. Repeatable up to 9 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Offered upon sufficient student enrollment. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Design solutions for problems found in students' society of origin and/or host country following the Problem-Solving Analysis Protocol. 2. Analyze information collected via observation, literature review, or direct experience into a cohesive explanation of the current state of affairs of a particular issue observed while traveling abroad. 3. Present conclusions of the analysis acquired during the field portion.