History (HIST)

Courses

HIST 1100. Western Civilization: From Pre-History to 1715 (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement, and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Explores the intellectual, social, ethical, religious, and aesthetic processes, institutions and ideas of Western Civilization from pre-history to 1715. Emphasizes reading, discussing, and writing about important texts and art forms of various periods. Successful completers will have developed an understanding of the general intellectual trends and historical contexts of western civilization through the Age of Reason. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the broad intellectual, social, economic, political, scientific, and aesthetic development of Western civilization from prehistory through the Renaissance. 2. Distinguish the Greek, Roman, medieval, and Renaissance incarnations of a variety of historical elements throughout the development of western civilization. 3. Define and discuss Western versions of such terms as humanness, family, city, state, civilization, science, technology, philosophy, reason, religion, art, literature, architecture, war, and work. 4. Analyze texts and materials in classroom discussions and on test essays. 5. Compare the past and present and evaluate the direct impact history has on their lives. FA.

HIST 1110. Western Civilization: From 1715 to Present (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills a General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Explores the intellectual, social, ethical, religious, and aesthetic processes, institutions and ideas of Western Civilization from 1715 to the present. Emphasizes reading, discussing, and writing about important texts and art forms of various periods. Successful completers will have developed an understanding of the general intellectual trends and historical contexts of western civilization after the Age of Reason. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the broad intellectual, social, economic, political, scientific, and aesthetic development of Western civilization from the Restoration to the present. 2. Define and discuss Western versions of such terms as humanness, family, city, state, civilization, science, technology, philosophy, reason, religion, art, literature, architecture, war, and work. 3. Analyze texts and materials in classroom discussions and on test essays. 4. Compare the past and present and evaluate the direct impact history has on their lives. SP.

HIST 1500. World History to 1500 (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Spans human origins and early civilizations to the emergence of European Empires and the early explorations of the Americas up to 1500 C.E. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze the political, economic, cultural and social developments in world history from the establishments of early civilizations to 1500 C.E. 2. Explain long-term and large-scale historical change. 3. Compare and contrast the interaction among salient civilizations. 4. Evaluate the causes and effects of particular historical events. 5. Improve their written and oral communication skills through an article report and class discussions. 6. Read and analyze primary and secondary sources. FA.

HIST 1510. World History Since 1500 (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Themes in the historical development of the world's peoples and cultures since 1500, tracing the decline of Asiatic Empires and the rise of European Empires. Students will study the diversity of global experiences and the emergence of the modern globalized economy. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Recall significant events and aspects regarding the development of world civilizations from approximately 1500 to present, examining the creation of "modern" cultures, societies, political systems, and economies. 2. Explain how and why peoples of the world existed, acted, and thought in the context of historical convergences, divergences, and interrelations among civilizations. 3. Construct analytical and cogent interpretations of global historical issues based on evidence which fosters critical thinking skills and works toward developing an understanding of how history has been recorded and continues to be interpreted. SP.

HIST 1700. American Civilization (AI). 3 Hours.

Fulfills the General Education American Institutions (Utah State Code R470) requirement. Surveys the historical, constitutional, and economic growth of the United States from colonial times to the present. Employs lectures, discussion, audio-visual materials, and various other instructional methods. Successful students will demonstrate a reasonable understanding of the history, principles, form of government, economic system of the United States, and the responsibilities of American citizens. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and understand the major chronological and topical divisions in U.S. history. 2. Demonstrate substantive knowledge of the social, cultural, economic, and political history of the United States. 3. Develop historical thinking skills and use them to analyze major historical themes and arguments found in primary and secondary source materials. 4. Argue and write analytically, cogently, and comparatively about significant issues in U.S. history. Prerequisite: Writing placement score of 17 or higher; or ENGL 1010, ENGL 1010D. FA, SP, SU.

HIST 1700S. American Civilization (AI). 3 Hours.

Fulfills the General Education American Institutions (Utah State Code R470) requirement. Surveys the historical, constitutional, and economic growth of the United States from colonial times to the present. Employs lectures, discussion, audio-visual materials, and various other instructional methods. Successful students will demonstrate a reasonable understanding of the history, principles, form of government, economic system of the United States, and the responsibilities of American citizens. This course was selected to participate in Dixie State University's Supplemental Instruction (SI) Program. This course adds one weekly class SI session but does not increase credit hours. SI is a series of weekly review sessions, led by peer SI leaders and designed to help students succeed in their academic pursuits. SI is provided for students who want to improve their understanding of course material and improve their grades. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and understand the major chronological and topical divisions in U.S. history. 2. Demonstrate substantive knowledge of the social, cultural, economic, and political history of the United States. 3. Develop historical thinking skills and use them to analyze major historical themes and arguments found in primary and secondary source materials. 4. Argue and write analytically, cogently, and comparatively about significant issues in U.S. history. Prerequisites: Writing placement score of 17 or higher; or ENGL 1010, ENGL 1010D. FA, SP.

HIST 2500. Latin American Civilization. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the major themes of Latin American history covering the social, cultural, political, and economic developments from the pre-Columbian civilizations through the 20th Century. Focusing on the interactions and adaptations of the people that have shaped the history of Latin America and coalesced to distinguish this region as important part of the Non-Western World. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Recall significant events and aspects regarding the periodization of Latin American history. From the emergence of pre-Columbian civilizations, to the course of the Spanish conquests and impact of colonialism, the struggle for independence, and the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in the countries of Latin America during the 19th and 20th centuries. 2. Explain how and why Latin Americans have existed, acted, and thought in the context of the pre-Columbian through the modern era. 3. Produce analytical research, based on primary and secondary sources, which engages in historical argumentation of a theme relevant to Latin American history in an appropriate and valid fashion. FA.

HIST 2600. Survey of Eastern Civilization. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the social, cultural, political, and economic developments in Eastern Civilization from ancient times through the nineteenth century. Focusing on historical significance, this course examines what distinguishes Eastern Civilization from Western Civilization. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the historical significance of the Eastern Civilization under examination and how its society and culture were shaped into the nineteenth century. 2. Understand the major geographic features that affected the development of the region. 3. Explain the philosophies and belief systems that originated in the region, such as Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. 4. Examine the significant cross-cultural exchanges across Eurasia that took place before 1800. 5. Recognize major events that distinguish Eastern Civilization from other parts of the world. SP.

HIST 2700. U.S. History to 1877. 3 Hours.

If both HIST 2700 and HIST 2710 are successfully completed, fulfills the General Education American Institutions (Utah State Code R470) requirement. If course is not used for American Institutions requirement, it can be used to fulfill the General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement. Chronological survey of the first half of the American experience, beginning with the Paleo-Indian cultures and emphasizing American Independence, development of the Constitution, the emergence of Jacksonian democracy, and the causes of the Civil War, through post-Civil War Reconstruction. Includes social, political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic developments throughout this period. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and understand the major chronological and topical divisions in U.S. history from the colonial era through the Civil War and Reconstruction. 2. Demonstrate substantive knowledge of the social, cultural, economic, political, and military history of the U.S. during this specific period. 3. Develop historical thinking skills and employ them to analyze key historical themes and arguments found in primary and secondary source materials. 4. Argue and write analytically, cogently, and comparatively about significant issues in the era through written exams and a brief research project. Prerequisite: Writing placement score 17 or higher; or ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D. FA.

HIST 2710. U.S. History Since 1877. 3 Hours.

If both HIST 2700 and HIST 2710 are successfully completed, fulfills the General Education American Institutions (Utah State Code R470) requirement. If course is not used for American Institutions requirement, it can be used to fulfill the General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement.Chronological survey of the second half of the American experience, beginning with the collapse of post-Civil War Reconstruction and emphasizing the growth of the U.S., emergence as a world power, and domestic reform of the twentieth century, through contemporary issues. Includes the social, political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic developments throughout this period. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate how American history since 1877 has shaped modern American society and culture. 2. Analyze a wide variety of historical sources using historical thinking techniques developed in the course. 3. Communicate historical knowledge, arguments, and interpretations both orally and in writing, including through the creation of a short research paper. Prerequisite: Writing placement score 17 or higher; or ENGL 1010, ENGL 1010D. SP.

HIST 3000. Historical Research Methodologies. 3 Hours.

A research intensive survey of the tools and techniques that historians use to study the past. Emphasis will be placed on historical theory, the process of historical inquiry, research methodologies, and the variety of physical and electronic resources available for historical research. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Become proficient in fundamental historical research methodologies and understanding the nature of scholarly historical inquiry, argumentation, and interpretation. 2. Produce an acceptable written proposal for an extended research project. 3. Demonstrate understanding of the nature and importance of historiography to historians by discussing key historiographical debates both orally and in writing. 4. Achieve proficiency in basic primary source research by working with a variety of primary sources in order to understand the proper utilization of those sources and the ways in which evidence determines arguments, interpretations, and conclusions at which historians arrive about the past. Prerequisites: HIST 2700 or HIST 2710, and ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA.

HIST 3010R. Special Topics in History. 3 Hours.

Specialty subjects in which topics/themes will be developed based upon the research specialties of department faculty. Repeatable for 15 credits as long as the topic varies and subject to graduation restrictions. Offered upon sufficient student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate how the political, social, and cultural developments of the historical time period, geographic location, or topic under discussion have shaped modern society and culture. 2. Analyze a wide variety of historical sources using historical thinking techniques developed in the course. 3. Communicate historical knowledge, arguments, and interpretations both orally and in writing, including through the creation of a major research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3040. Early Modern Britain (1485-1716). 3 Hours.

A study of England, Scotland, and Ireland with the emphasis on the social, cultural, political, religious and economic development from 1485 to 1715. This course will cover the Reformation, the civil war, and a monarchial and parliamentary revolution among other subjects. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explore the history, culture, politics, religion and economy of England, Scotland, and Ireland between 1485 and 1714. 2. Explore, analyze, and discuss the historical backgrounds of the famous social, political, and religious leaders of those countries. 3. Think critically about history and today's events in the light of the past. 4. Engage in class discussions and conduct independent research projects that will clearly articulate historical interpretations and use professional methodologies. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). FA (odd).

HIST 3150. Russian History from 1860-1924. 3 Hours.

Surveys Russian history for the second half of the nineteenth century from the abolition of serfdom through Lenin. Discusses the fall of the Russian Empire, post-1917 Russia, the role of revolutionary ideology, industrialization of agrarian society, the emergence of Soviet institutions and culture. Emphasizes new definitions of gender, national and class identity, and the interaction between the intellectual elite and the working people. Also discusses major imperial expansion, internal diversity, and various 19th century challenges to empire, including parallels to and clashes with other expanding societies such as the United States. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify, explore, discuss, and analyze the main events of Russian history from 1860 to 1924, covering the abolition of serfdom, WWI, Lenin's rise to power, the fall of the Russian Empire, the October Revolution, and the formation of the Soviet Union. 2. Investigate new definitions of gender, national and class identity, and the interaction between the intellectual elite and the working people. Explain the significance of the major events discussed to the development of the Soviet Union and the world around it and think critically about history and today's events. 3. Engage in class discussions and conduct independent research projects that will clearly articulate historical interpretations and use professional methodologies. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). FA (even).

HIST 3160. Russian History 1924-Present. 3 Hours.

Highlights the formation, development and collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia's participation in the industrial revolution, two world wars and other critical moments in modern history. Starts with Joseph Stalin's rise to power and finishes with the analysis of the Cold War and the role of the new Russia in the 21st century. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify, explore, discuss, and analyze the main events of Russian history from 1924 to the present, covering WWI and WWII, the industrial revolution, Stalin's rise to power, the development and collapse of the Soviet Empire, the Cold War, and the new Russia's position in the modern world. 2. Identify and analyze the historical backgrounds of the famous cultural, social, and political leaders of the times. 3. Explain the significance and contributions of the major events and figures discussed to the modern world and think critically about history and today's events. 4. Engage in class discussions and conduct independent research projects that will clearly articulate historical interpretations and use professional methodologies. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). SP (odd).

HIST 3180. Nineteenth Century Europe. 3 Hours.

Analyzes transformations in political, economic, and social ideologies of Europe from 1815 to 1914, using primary documents on a variety of ideologies. Includes active class participation and discussion, and much writing in areas agreed upon between instructor and student. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate how the political, social, and cultural developments of European history from 1815-1914 have shaped modern European society and culture. 2. Analyze a wide variety of historical sources using historical thinking techniques developed in the course. 3. Communicate historical knowledge, arguments, and interpretations both orally and in writing, including through the creation of a major research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). FA (odd).

HIST 3190. Twentieth Century Europe. 3 Hours.

Surveys major forces, events and experiences that shaped Europe from 1914 to 2000 and defined its place in the contemporary world. Examines industrialization, nationalism, colonial empires, world wars, Cold War polarization, and the European Union. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate how the political, social, and cultural developments of European history since 1914 have shaped modern European society and culture. 2. Analyze a wide variety of historical sources using historical thinking techniques developed in the course. 3. Communicate historical knowledge, arguments, and interpretations both orally and in writing, including through the creation of a major research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). SP (even).

HIST 3230. American Foreign Relations. 3 Hours.

Upper-level elective intended for history majors, social science composite majors, history minors, and interested DSU students. Explores the history of United States diplomatic and foreign relations from the era of colonization to the present. Covers the rise of the United States as a world power, the impact of cultural and economic developments on foreign relations, and evolving conceptions of sovereignty, nationality, and citizenship. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate how the political, social, and cultural developments of American foreign relations have shaped modern American and global society and culture. 2. Analyze a wide variety of historical sources using historical thinking techniques developed in the course. 3. Communicate historical knowledge, arguments, and interpretations both orally and in writing, including through the creation of a major research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). FA (odd).

HIST 3240. British History (1714-Present). 3 Hours.

Survey of British history from 1714 to the present, with special emphasis given to Britain's cultural, political, economic, and social development during the Industrial Revolution, the Victorian era, and the twentieth century. Also explores the relationship between the bodies of different types of citizens and the British state, the decline of Victorian values and the rise of New Labour, and Britain's relationship with and its place within the European Union. In addition, tracks the rise and fall of the British Empire and Britain's overall foreign and colonial policies, plus her role in the Napoleonic Wars, WWI and WWII. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe and analyze Britain's cultural, political, economic, and social development during the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, the Victorian era, and the twentieth century. 2. Explore, evaluate, and reflect upon the relationship between the bodies of different types of citizens and the British state, the decline of Victorian values and the rise of New Labour, and Britain's relationship with and its place within the European Union. 3. Not only identify key historical events that took place between 1714 and present day, but also explain their significance to the development of Britain and the world. They should also be able to think critically about history and today's events. 4. Engage in class discussions and conduct independent research projects that will clearly articulate historical interpretations and use professional methodologies. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). SP (even).

HIST 3250. World War II. 3 Hours.

Upper-level elective intended for history majors, social science composite majors, history minors, and interested DSU students. Examines the causes, history, and impact of the Second World War in both a European and a global context; special attention will be paid both to military events and to how the war influenced the cultural, social, political, and economic destinies of the many people who experienced it. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate how the political, social, cultural, and military developments of World War II have shaped modern society and culture. 2. Analyze a wide variety of historical sources using historical thinking techniques developed in the course. 3. Communicate historical knowledge, arguments, and interpretations both orally and in writing, including through the creation of a major research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA (odd).

HIST 3460. Comparative Asian History. 3 Hours.

Surveys history of Asian continent, analyzing common patterns in the cultures of South, Southeast, and East Asia. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2017 based upon student demand. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3480. East Asia to 1800. 3 Hours.

Explores the intellectual, social, political, cultural, and religious traditions of China, Japan, and Korea from antiquity to 1800. Each "country" will be addressed in a chronological framework. Analyzes the values and institutions underlying the East Asian world order, compares and contrasts the distinctive characteristics of each country, and explores the impact of East Asia's interdependence and early interaction with the West. Will be taught in two year consecutive cycles in the Fall beginning 2017 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain how the Chinese model of civilization spread to Korea and Japan before 1800. 2. Understand major geographic features in East Asia and discuss how these features affected the cultural development of China, Korea, and Japan. 3. Demonstrate their ability to compare literature and analyze primary and secondary sources. 4. Display their ability to critically analyze sources and place them in a historiographical context. 5. Improve their writing skills by literature reviews, essay exams, and a research paper, and their oral skills by in-class discussions and a research presentation. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3490. East Asia Since 1800. 3 Hours.

Examines the interrelated histories of China, Japan, and Korea, focusing especially on the forces that brought to the formation of modern East Asian nations in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: wars, colonialism, imperialism, Cold War geopolitics, nationalism, and socialism. Aims at understanding the historical origins of problems that continue to impact East Asia today and at placing the national history of China, Japan, and Korea within a wider East Asian regional framework. Will be taught in a two year consecutive cycle beginning Spring 2015 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Discuss social, cultural, political, and economic developments in East Asia since 1800. 2. Compare and contrast China, Korea, and Japan's responses to Western imperialism and the process of modernization. 3. Demonstrate their ability to compare literature and analyze primary and secondary sources. 4. Display their ability to critically analyze sources and place them in a historiographical context. 5. Improve their writing skills by literature reviews, essay exams, and a research paper, and their oral skills by in-class discussions and a research presentation. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3550. Culture of East Asia. 3 Hours.

Explores the culture of three East Asian countries: China, Japan and Korea. Students gain sincere view and understanding of these East Asian cultures through readings, hands-on cultural activities, writing, and discussions on major historical and social events. Will be taught every three years in Fall beginning 2016 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the unique concepts and cultural values of East Asia, specifically Japan, Korea, and China. 2. Understand how Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism shaped the East Asian cultural identity in the early modern period. 3. Demonstrate their ability to compare literature and analyze primary and secondary sources. 4. Display their ability to critically analyze sources and place them in a historiographical context. 5. Improve their writing skills by literature reviews, essay exams, and a research paper, and their oral skills by in-class discussions and a research presentation. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3620. Hist of Colonial Latin Amer. 3 Hours.

A topical study of Latin American history from the conquests of the Aztec and Inca in the sixteenth century until the wars of independence in the nineteenth century. This course assesses the impact of Spanish colonialism (as well as that of the Portuguese) on Native Americans and outlines the evolving institutional bases of life in colonial Latin America, including: colonial politics, society, economies, and culture as well as patterns of resistance and accommodation. Will be taught in a two year consecutive cycle beginning Fall 2016 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Recall significant events and aspects regarding the development of Pre-Columbian civilizations in Latin America, the Spanish conquests of the Aztec, Inca, and Maya empires, and the impact of European colonialism on Native Americans and other immigrants to the region culminating in the wars for independence during the nineteenth century. 2. Explain how and why Latin Americans have existed, acted, and thought in the context of the Pre-Columbian and colonial eras. 3. Produce analytical research, with an emphasis on primary sources, which engages in historical argumentation of a major theme of Latin America during the colonial (or Pre-Columbian) period in an appropriate and valid fashion. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3630. History of Modern Latin America. 3 Hours.

A topical study of Latin American history since the wars of independence in the nineteenth century up to the present. This course assesses the major political, social, and economic changes that took place throughout Latin America during this momentous period of nation-state formation and engagement with the rest of the world. Will be taught in a two year consecutive cycle beginning Spring 2017 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Recall significant events and aspects regarding: the struggle for independence of early Latin American republics; the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in these countries during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; and the region's interaction with the rest of the world. 2. Explain how and why Latin Americans have existed, acted, and thought in the context of the modern period. 3. Produce analytical research, with an emphasis on primary sources, which engages in historical argumentation of a theme relevant to Latin America during the modern period in an appropriate and valid fashion. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3640. History of Latin American Revolutions. 3 Hours.

Examines the major revolutionary movements in modern Latin America, particularly during the twentieth century. Including, but not limited to, those movements that developed in Mexico, Cuba, Chile, and Nicaragua. Students will analyze the political, economic, social, and cultural elements at work domestically and internationally that compelled people in these countries to rebel against their government and the status quo. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2016 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Recall significant events and aspects regarding the origins, processes, objectives, and outcomes of Latin America's major revolutionary (and counter-revolutionary) movements during the twentieth century. 2. Apply a theoretical framework for understanding these revolutions that take into consideration local, national, and international contexts. 3. Produce analytical research, with an emphasis on primary sources, which engages in historical argumentation of a theme relevant to Latin American Revolutions in an appropriate and valid fashion. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3660. History of Mexico. 3 Hours.

Surveys the history of Mexico from the earliest human inhabitation to the present by presenting different interpretations of the major themes and developments in Mexican social, economic, political, and cultural history, including: the reign of the Aztec Empire, Spanish conquest and colonialism, the Porfiriato, and the Mexican Revolution. The goal of this course is to foster a deeper understanding of and appreciation for Mexico's past. Will be taught every three years in Fall beginning 2015 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Recall significant events and aspects regarding: pre-Columbian civilizations, Spanish colonialism, the independence era, the Reform and Porfiriato, as well as the Mexican Revolution and its impact. 2. Explain how and why Mexicans have existed, acted, and thought in the context of the modern period. 3. Produce analytical research, with an emphasis on primary sources, which engages in historical argumentation of a theme relevant to Mexico in an appropriate and valid fashion. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3670. Slavery & the American Republic. 3 Hours.

Explores the creation of slavery in North America from European settlement until 1865, and emphasizes the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the creation of hereditary chattel slavery in America, the government and legal mechanisms that allowed this, slave life and culture, and the efforts to abolish the institution before the Civil War. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2018 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate a substantive knowledge of the creation, growth, and development of slavery in the U.S. 2. Develop knowledge of the questions about and interpretations of slave life by reading and discussing important parts of the secondary scholarship about slavery. 3. Undertake a research project pertinent to American slavery requiring them to argue and write clearly, cogently, and analytically regarding an important issue, problem, or phenomenon. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3720. Colonial America (1607-1763). 3 Hours.

An in-depth exploration of the economic, political, social, and military growth and development of British North America from its founding in 1607 until the Revolutionary War experience of the 1770s. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2016 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate a substantive knowledge of the social, cultural, economic, political, and military developments in British North America from the founding of Virginia to the beginning of the political difficulties between colonists and the English government. 2. Argue and write analytically, clearly, cogently, and comparatively about an important issue, problem, or phenomenon in colonial America through various vehicles including research essays, historiographical essays, and book reviews. 3. Develop and hone argumentation and discussion skills by contributing to in-class dialogues pertinent to historical ideas, arguments, and interpretations. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3730. The American Civil War and Reconstruction (1848-1876). 3 Hours.

Examines America's greatest crisis from the Mexican War (1846-48) through the abandonment of Reconstruction in 1877, exploring the political, social, economic, and military aspects of the nation's march to war, the conflagration that preserved the Union and ended slavery, and the efforts to reconstruct a shattered South. The course also investigates how Americans remember the Civil War and Reconstruction. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2018 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and understand the key elements and forces generally thought to have led to the American Civil War and subsequent Reconstruction experience. 2. Argue and write analytically, clearly, cogently, and comparatively about the historiographical debates crucial to understanding the causal and correlative factors that led to the Civil War and influenced its prosecution accomplished through various approaches including research projects, book reviews, and historiographical essays. 3. Develop and hone argumentation and discussion skills by contributing to class discussions based on readings in the scholarly literature about the Civil War and Reconstruction. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher).

HIST 3740. Emergence of Modern America (1876 - 1945). 3 Hours.

A concentrated survey that explores U.S. history from the Gilded Age in the late nineteenth century through the Progressive Era of reform, WWI, the 1920s, the Great Depression and the New Deal, ending with the conclusion of WWII. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate how the political, social, and cultural developments of American history from 1876-1945 have shaped modern American society and culture. 2. Analyze a wide variety of historical sources using historical thinking techniques developed in the course. 3. Communicate historical knowledge, arguments, and interpretations both orally and in writing, including through the creation of a major research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). FA (even).

HIST 3750. Contemporary America (1945-Present). 3 Hours.

Covers recent United States history, including domestic and foreign policy since World War II. Emphasizes Cold War, Civil Rights, and the political and social developments of contemporary America. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate how the political, social, and cultural developments of American history since 1945 have shaped modern American society and culture. 2. Analyze a wide variety of historical sources using historical thinking techniques developed in the course. 3. Communicate historical knowledge, arguments, and interpretations both orally and in writing, including through the creation of a major research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). SP (odd).

HIST 3870. History of Utah. 3 Hours.

Examines the history of Utah from the earliest human inhabitants, through the settlement by European/Americans in the so-called pioneer period, and on to Statehood. The relationship of Utah's Dixie to Utah's history is a subtopic throughout the course. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and understand the major chronological and topical divisions in Utah history. 2. Develop historical thinking skills and employ them to analyze key historical themes and arguments found in primary and secondary source materials pertinent to Utah history. 3. Argue and write analytically, cogently, and comparatively about significant social, cultural, economic, political, and economic issues in Utah history through written exams and a research project. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 or ENGL 2010A (Grade C or higher). SP.

HIST 4310. History of Nationalism. 3 Hours.

Examines development of nationalism. Addresses different theories of nationalism, and then tests these theories with various case studies. Emphasizes research and writing. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate how the political, social, cultural, and military developments of nationalism have shaped modern society and culture. 2. Analyze a wide variety of historical sources using historical thinking techniques developed in the course. 3. Communicate historical knowledge, arguments, and interpretations both orally and in writing, including through the creation of a major research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4370. History of Social Movements in Modern America. 3 Hours.

Examines the causes, the organizational methods, the goals, the results, and the historical significance of movements that served to expand social, economic, and political rights in twentieth century America. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate how American social movements from the late 1800s to the present have shaped modern American society and culture. 2. Analyze a wide variety of historical sources using historical thinking techniques developed in the course. 3. Communicate historical knowledge, arguments, and interpretations both orally and in writing, including through the creation of a major research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4400. Introduction to Islam. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the history, politics, and culture of Islam in order to increase the understanding of the contemporary dimension of this world religion. Dual listed with POLS 4400 (students may take only one course for credit). **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and understand the major chronological and topical divisions in the history of Islam. 2. Develop historical thinking skills and employ them to analyze key historical themes and arguments found in primary and secondary source materials pertinent to Islamic history. 3. Argue and write analytically, cogently, and comparatively about significant social, cultural, and political issues in the history of Islam through written exams and a research project. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher). SP (odd).

HIST 4490. Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. 3 Hours.

Examines the events and ideas in Germany and elsewhere that produced the Nazi state, the Second World War, and the Holocaust. Special attention will be given to the political, cultural and economic events that led to the rise of Hitler and to the reasons for racism, bigotry and intolerance, including the controversial issues of Nazi terror, the 'blame' for these years of murder and war, and the link between the WWII and the Holocaust. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate how the political, social, and cultural developments of Nazi Germany and the Holocaust have shaped modern society and culture. 2. Analyze a wide variety of historical sources using historical thinking techniques developed in the course. 3. Communicate historical knowledge, arguments, and interpretations both orally and in writing, including through the creation of a major research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4700. African-American History 1619-Present. 3 Hours.

Surveys major aspects of African Americans' experience and includes their West African background, enslavement, emancipation during the Civil War and Reconstruction, segregation and marginalization, civil rights struggles for equality and inclusion, and the achievements and challenges posed in the late twentieth century and the modern era. Will be taught every three years in Fall beginning 2017 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and describe the most significant social, cultural, economic, political, and military aspects of the African American experience. 2. Argue and write analytically, clearly, cogently, and comparatively regarding African Americans' experience in slavery, strivings for freedom and inclusion in American society, and the evolution and contours of their freedom into the twenty-first century in the form of research projects, historiographical essays, and book reviews. 3. Develop and improve argumentation and discussion skills by contributing to class discussions based on readings in the scholarly literature of the African American experience. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4710. The American Revolution. 3 Hours.

Examines the social, political, economic, and military contours of the American experience from the French and Indian War through George Washington's first presidential administration, with the major focus placed on the origins, process, and effects of the Revolutionary War. Will be taught every three years in Fall beginning 2016 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate substantive knowledge of the social, cultural, economic, political, and military components of the American Revolution. 2. Argue and write analytically, clearly, cogently, and comparatively concerning the background, prosecution, and outcome of the Revolutionary War experience through research essays, historiographic compositions, and book reviews of monographs offering important interpretations of this era. 3. Develop and improve argumentation and oral discussion skills by contributing to class discussions based on readings in the scholarly literature about the American Revolution. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4720. The New Nation (1789-1848). 3 Hours.

Explores the major social, political, economic, and military contours of the United States from the establishment of the republic's new government under the Constitution through the Mexican-American War, 1846-1848. Will be taught every three years in Spring beginning 2017 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate substantive knowledge of important social, cultural, economic, political, and military developments in this crucial era of the republic before the Civil War. 2. Argue and write analytically, clearly, cogently, and comparatively regarding important aspects of the tests and challenges facing the early American republic through exams, research essays, book reviews, and historiographical compositions. 3. Develop and improve argumentation and oral discussion skills by contributing to class discussions rooted in readings in the scholarly literature concerning this era. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4730. Society and Culture in the United States (1780-1860). 3 Hours.

A topical examination of American cultural and social history between the Revolution and the Civil War, focusing on the growth and development of the nation's market economy, slavery and abolition, changes in family life, evolving understandings of democracy and republicanism, and the rise of popular literature, amusements, and religion. Will be taught every three years in Fall beginning 2015 based upon student demand. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate substantive knowledge of the important cultural developments unfolding in America in the era designated. 2. Argue and write analytically, clearly, cogently, and comparatively regarding various aspects of American cultural life during this period, the vehicles for doing so being a mix of exams, research projects, book reviews, and historiographical essays. 3. Develop and improve argumentation and oral discussion skills by contributing to class discussions based on readings in the academic literature relevant to this era of cultural development in America. Prerequisite: ENGL 2010 (Grade C or higher).

HIST 4800R. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students in the History Department who wish to pursue a specific focus of special interest not available in the existing course offerings. Students work under close supervision by appropriate faculty in the design and successful completion of the course. Structured by a formal contractual arrangement with the faculty member that is submitted at the beginning of the semester in which that course work is undertaken. Students are expected to meet with the faculty mentor each week and to provide the faculty member with progress reports and assignment development for feedback and grading purposes on an ongoing basis. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Offered by arrangement.

HIST 4890. Senior Capstone. 3 Hours.

Senior history seminar emphasizing historiographical literacy, research, and writing skills in relation to a specific historical topic. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Produce a substantive written research project based on a clearly articulated, open-ended, researchable historical question yielding a well-argued and debatable conclusion rooted in their examination and interpretation of the primary and secondary source materials used to conduct their research. Students must share their work with others in the class by offering an oral presentation of their projects supported by any ancillary aids and enhancements they select. Prerequisite: HIST 3000 (Grade C or higher). SP.