Psychology (PSY)

Courses

PSY 1001. FYE: Psychology/Social Science. 1 Hour.

For students interested in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Archeology, Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies, and Political Science). This course is designed to help students set the conditions to maximize their university experience. In particular, this course will help students understand and adapt to university life and expectations, refine university level skills and abilities, create and foster social networks, and introduce them to different fields of study, degree options, and career opportunities within the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Multiple listed with all other sections of First Year Experience (all 1001 courses, ENGR 1000). Students may only take one FYE course for credit.

PSY 1010. General Psychology (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. For students in all disciplines who are interested in the fundamental scientific principles of behavior. Includes the study of learning, motivation, emotion, personality, mental disorders, treatment alternatives, and other related subjects as part of the course. Critical thinking will be explored in examining these aspects of behavior. Students will have frequent examinations and quizzes as part of the course requirements. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Construct basic knowledge of psychology theories, and identify different fields in the psychology discipline. 2. Articulate different models of research used in the field of psychology. 3. Critically evaluate psychology literature as well as speak to the pitfalls and the strengths of research trends in psychology. 4. Explore multicultural issues related to the field of psychology. 5. Analyze multiple views, theories, and ideas currently held in the field. FA, SP, SU.

PSY 1100. Human Development Through Lifespan (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement and is an approved Global & Cultural Perspectives course. For all students who are interested in knowing how and why people change through the course of a lifetime. Covers biological, cognitive, and social changes from prenatal development to late adulthood. Studies scientific methods of collecting and interpreting data, analyzes developmental events from various perspectives, and focuses on applying this knowledge to one's own development. Utilizes textbook reading, tests, quizzes, and journal writing. Dual listed with FSHD 1500 (students may take only one course for credit). **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Understand how humans develop across the lifespan. 2. Identify biological, cognitive, and socio-emotional changes across the lifespan. 3. Predict development that occurs during gestation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, emerging adulthood, adulthood, and old age. 4. Compare human development across different cultures. 5. Apply developmental theories and trends to their own lives. 6. Students will be able discuss developmental theories as it applies to their own life experiences. 7. Differentiate between principles and processes of developmental theories and research methodologies. 8. Evaluate universal changes, cultural generalities, gender disparities, and individual differences within each life stage. FA, SP, SU.

PSY 1210. Psychology of Personal Growth. 3 Hours.

For all students who have a desire to increase self-awareness, understanding, and personal growth. Includes information on social influences, stress, health issues, communication, relationships, and challenges associated with marriage, child rearing, work, and aging. Uses textbook readings, group discussions, and journal writing to explore past and present decisions and to make future choices to promote personal growth toward self-actualization and fulfillment. Completion of PSY 1010 is recommended before enrolling in this course. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Formulate knowledge of the theoretical background of personal learning and growth theories. 2. Apply theories to the understanding of personal growth. 3. Describe cultural values and relationship to personal growth ideals. 4. Examine growth theory with relation to self and personal actualization. SP.

PSY 2000. Writing in Psychology: APA Style. 3 Hours.

Required of psychology majors and recommended for students in all disciplines interested in understanding and more effectively using APA writing style. An introduction to the effective use and application of APA style for research projects, technical papers, and expository writing in the psychological and behavioral sciences. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the basic components of APA style. 2. Identify and locate relevant journals and databases in psychology. 3. Analyze and synthesize empirical articles as a means of writing an APA literature review. Prerequisites: PSY 1010; AND ENGL 2010; AND Psychology major OR Psychology minor OR Health Psychology minor OR Integrated Studies major with emphasis in Psychology. FA, SP.

PSY 2430. Stress Management. 3 Hours.

For students of all disciplines who wish to learn more about the stress response. Sources of stress, physiological and psychological responses to stress and other components of stress will be investigated. Students will be given relaxation training through several alternative approaches. Includes examinations from the text, completion of self-appraisals, and self-exploration through written exercises. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Examine sources of stress and theoretical underpinnings. 2. Identify personal sources of stress and the components involved. 3. Create stress reduction strategies that can be directly applied to stress related behaviors. 4. Explain stress from and emotional and biological perspective. FA.

PSY 2480. Substance Abuse: Prevention. 3 Hours.

For students of all disciplines wishing to expand their awareness of the effects of drugs on the human body, to learn more about local, state, and federal laws regulating the use of drugs and alcohol, to become acquainted with information which identifies and describes characteristics of users, and to recognize healthy lifestyles as a viable alternative to substance abuse. Course requires reading, in-class oral presentation, and examinations from the textbook. SP.

PSY 2800. Human Sexuality in a Diverse Society (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social & Behavioral Science General Education and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Provides a basic understanding of the academic and scientific study of human sexuality with an emphasis on diversity in human sexuality. Human sexuality is examined from multiple perspectives; including historical, religious, biological, psychological, sociological, anthropological, and political; as well as medical, ethical and legal issues. The course is intended to provide an in-depth, college-level understanding of the foundations and diversity of human sexuality. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Build basic knowledge of sexuality theories and perspectives. 2. Investigate research findings related to issues of sexuality. 3. Describe sexual anatomy and physiology, as well as sexual health. 4. Explain sexual deviance and pathology. FA, SP.

PSY 3000. Statistical Methods/Psychology. 4 Hours.

Required of Psychology majors. An introduction to and application of statistical methods in psychological research. Students will design and measure psychological constructs; select, compute, and interpret descriptive and inferential statistics; use computer technology to facilitate statistical analyses; accurately represent the results of statistical analyses; and critically analyze methodological and statistical arguments. Combined lecture/lab. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 (Grade C or higher); and MATH 1040; AND Psychology major, Psychology minor or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3010. Research Methods in Psychology. 4 Hours.

Required of Psychology majors. An introduction to the research process; deductive and inductive reasoning in science, the nature of theory, hypothesis testing and the use of empirical data; scientific knowledge and its applications. Naturalistic, case study, correlation, and experimental research methods in Psychology will be examined. Combined lecture / lab. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define terminology and explain concepts fundamental to research design and methodology. 2. Apply skills in using library resources for reviewing psychological literature, and understand and critically evaluate research articles collected. 3. Conduct research, perform SPSS analysis and interpret the results, and complete both a written and oral presentation of research in appropriate APA style. Prerequisites: PSY 3000; Psychology major, Psychology minor or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3020. Applied Research Methods in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Required of Psychology majors seeking a Bachelors of Arts degree. An introduction to the research process; deductive and inductive reasoning in science, the nature of theory, hypothesis testing and the use of empirical data; scientific knowledge and its applications. Naturalistic, case study, correlation and experimental research methods in Psychology will be examined. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Define appropriate terminology and explain concepts fundamental to research design and methodology. 2. Understand and critically evaluate research articles. 3. Conduct a thorough literature review, including a complete written report in appropriate APA style. 4. Explain to others the details of research studies through an oral presentation. Prerequisites: MATH 1040 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor or Integrated Studies major with Psychology emphasis. FA, SP.

PSY 3040. Psychology of Gender. 3 Hours.

For Behavioral Science majors and others interested in gender issues from a psychological perspective. Examines the topic of gender behaviors and attitudes that relate to (but are not entirely congruent with) biological sex. Discusses biological influences on gender, gender differences, gender development, and the influence of gender on various dimensions of daily life. Offered in rotation; consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Articulate basic knowledge of the theoretical background of gender theories. 2. Investigate the differences and similarities of gender and sex. 3. Analyze the equalities and inequalities in a cultural context regarding gender and sex. 4. Reflect on personal experience with gender and identity. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission.

PSY 3100. Profiling Deviant Behavior. 3 Hours.

An historical and theoretical exploration of deviant behavior specifically analyzing particular forms of deviant behavior such as murder and rape, among other crimes. These topics will be discussed using the criminal thinking approach, sociopathic and psychopathic behavior analysis, and life course perspectives. Dual listed with CJ 3100 (students may only take one course for credit). Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (both Grade C or higher), AND CJ 1010 or PSY 1010 (both Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3120. Cognitive Psychology. 3 Hours.

Introduction to basic principles of human and non-human cognition. Topics include perception, categorization, attention, memory, knowledge representation, judgment and decision making, and problem solving. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Develop an understanding of how cognitive psychologists apply the scientific method study the mind. 2. Learn to apply a variety of scientific techniques used in cognitive psychology and appropriate theories to a variety of mental activities. 3. Coordinate knowledge across a variety of techniques and cognitive psychology topics. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, Social Science Composite Teaching, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3200. Development in Infancy & Childhood. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social/Developmental Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Covers the theories and research on prenatal development, pregnancy and birth, infants' sensory and motor capabilities, brain development, attachment, children's understanding of their physical and social world, pretense and theory of mind, language and reasoning, self-concept, parent-child and peer relations, self-control and morality. Biological, cognitive and social-cultural perspectives will be considered. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe the major domains, theories, and themes of child development. 2. Investigate empirical findings in development psychology. 3. Observe, record and evaluate development in accord with theories of development, developmental milestones and empirical research. Prerequisites: PSY 1100 or FCS 1500; AND PSY 2000 or BIO 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA.

PSY 3220. Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social/Developmental Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Provides a basic understanding of key developmental transitions during adolescence and emerging adulthood (e.g., biological, cognitive, social and emotional), some of the contexts in which these transitions are situated (e.g., family, school, culture) and how these transitions and contexts might interact with one another. Prerequisites: PSY 1100 or FCS 1500; AND PSY 2000 or BIO 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. SP.

PSY 3230. Adult Development & Aging. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social/Developmental Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. The study of adult lives from a life-span perspective. In addition to the psychology of aging, students will investigate societal influences on aging. Topics include theories of the life-cycle, identity formation, the experience of growing older, personality stability, and psychological adjustment to the myths and realities of age. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Articulate and apply what is known about the bio-behavioral, cognitive and psycho-social processes throughout adulthood. 2. Apply empirical knowledge about adult development to self and others. 3. Assess adult development theories and differences with multicultural issues. Prerequisites: PSY 1100 or FSHD 1500 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA.

PSY 3320. Survey of Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the basics of clinical psychology. The focus will be on introductory clinical helping skills and theory. This course stresses the importance of theory, quality research, prevention, assessment skills, and clinical abilities in interventions. Topics discussed will include real world application, skill role modeling, and critical evaluation of techniques and clinical issues. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply knowledge of clinical psychology theory and practice. 2. Build cultural competence and awareness regarding the nature of clinical work. 3. Select appropriate theories to apply in practice in a clinical case studies. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3400 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. SP (odd).

PSY 3400. Psychology of Abnormal Behavior. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Clinical/Applied Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. An advanced course for students of all disciplines who wish to study the nature of mental disorders. Particularly important for students majoring in psychology, criminal justice, or education. Course will cover DSM IV diagnostic categories with descriptive information concerning etiology, symptomatology and therapeutic strategies. Requires college reading level skills and will require library research. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe diagnostic criteria of different psychological disorders and manifestations of dysfunctional behaviors. 2. Analyze current research findings with treatment and interventions for psychopathy. 3. Explain historical roots of theory, practice, and treatment with regard to abnormal psychology and mental pathology. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology major, Social Science Composite Teaching, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3410. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social/Developmental Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. The scientific study of how individuals' thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by other people. Topic areas include identity, social perception, attitudes, persuasion, conformity and obedience, stereotypes and prejudice, group conflict, aggression and violence, helping behavior, and interpersonal relationships. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3420. Psy of Culture & Diversity. 3 Hours.

Designed to deepen appreciation and understanding of cross-cultural research and its applications as well as the influence of culture on all aspects of psychology. Covers theory and research on the values, norms, group behavior, socialization, cognitive development, and psychopathology in comparative cultural perspective. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe fundamental knowledge of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives and historical trends related to the psychology of diversity and culture. 2. Identify social and ethical challenges, including possible resolutions related to the psychology of diversity and culture. 3. Describe an understanding of how culture and diversity differences affect personal mental health. 4. Describe an understanding of how culture and diversity differences affect workplace interactions. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. SP (odd).

PSY 3440. Child & Family Mental Health. 3 Hours.

Provides a basic understanding of the emerging field of family mental health. Family mental health considers parent and child development (biological, cognitive, social and emotional), family relationships and family functioning. The course will include an introduction to observation, screening and assessment, diagnosis and intervention and interdisciplinary / multidisciplinary collaboration in the field of family mental health. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Examine the history and theories of infant parent mental health. 2. Explain typical and atypical development in infancy through early childhood. 3. Apply knowledge of interdisciplinary/multidisciplinary collaboration in infant family mental health settings. 4. Discuss diagnosis and interventions with regard to infants and families. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 (Grade C or higher) and PSY 1100 or FCS 1500; AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology; or instructor permission. SP.

PSY 3450. Intro to Child Life Theory & Practice. 3 Hours.

Provides an introduction to the theory and practice of the child life profession as a field in developmental psychology and family centered care when children have an acute, chronic, or life-threatening illness and traumatic injuries. Topics include children's emotional reactions to hospitalization, use of play, preparation, family support, designing healing environments, and specializations within the field. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Understand the psychosocial needs of infants, children, adolescents and families within the healthcare system. 2. Learn assessment skills required of child life professionals. 3. Explain basic principles of family-centered care principles and theory. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 (Grade C or higher); AND ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1010D (Grade C or higher) or ACT placement of 28 or higher; AND PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology Major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA.

PSY 3460. Health Psychology. 3 Hours.

Examines the relationship between psycho-social factors and health and provides a broad overview using the basic concepts, theories, methods, and applications of health psychology. Course will critically examine state-of-the-art research as well as current gaps in knowledge to explore topics including: definitions and vice-versa, patient-practitioner relations, and health promotion. Emphasis will be placed on the ways psychological factors interact with the social, cultural, economic, and environmental contexts of health. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe the effect of culture, environment, and society as well as health policy on health and wellbeing. 2. Explain theories and models of health and behavior change, challenges to sustaining health change, and how this relates to the field of psychology. 3. Examine the role of Health Psychologists in the health care system. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3480. Psychology of Sports & Exercise. 3 Hours.

Examines the relationship between psychosocial factors and sports and exercise. Provides a broad overview of the basic concepts, theories, methods, and applications of sports psychology. Emphasis will be placed on the ways psychological factors interact with the social, developmental, and environmental contexts of sports and exercise. Offered upon sufficient student need. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 and PSY 2000 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission.

PSY 3700. Personality Theory. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social/Developmental Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Offers students the opportunity for expanded self-understanding and understanding of others based on established personality theories. Primary focus is on presentation and discussion of diverse theoretical views of personality and personality development. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 or PSY 1010A; AND PSY 2000 or BIO 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3710. Behavioral Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Biological/Cognitive Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Introduction to how the structure and function of the brain and the nervous system relate to specific psychological processes and overt behaviors including cognitive functions, sensory and motor systems, emotions, regulatory behaviors, reproductive behaviors, and psychopathology. Completion of PSY 3000 and 3010 is recommended before enrolling in this course. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe the structure and function of the nervous system, and explain how it contributes to complex behaviour. 2. Evaluate different methods of behavioural neuroscience research, and apply that knowledge to topics relevant to behavioral neuroscience. 3. Explain phenomena such as sensory processing, learning and memory, sleep, emotions. 4. Apply principles of behavioral neuroscience to the etiology and treatment of a variety of psychological disorders. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010 (Grade C or higher); or BIOL 1610 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology major, Social Science Composite Teaching, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 3712. Human Learning & Memory. 3 Hours.

Explores the theoretical and experimental analysis of learning and memory. Emphasis on historical concepts of learning and memory systems, encoding and retrieval processes as well as mechanisms of forgetting. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the behavioral processes underlying learning and memory phenomena. 2. Describe the brain substrates responsible for learning and memory. 3. Apply knowledge of the behavioral and brain basis of learning and memory to clinical phenomena. Prerequisite: PSY 2000 (Grade C or higher).

PSY 3720. Psychopharmacology. 3 Hours.

Focuses on how the chemical functions of the brain, examining how behavior and environment can change brain functions, and how medications and drugs alter those functions. Includes a basic survey of neuropharmacology, the effects of various psychotropic drugs, and the actions of drugs used to treat mental disorders. Principles covered include neurophysiological mechanisms involved in synaptic activity, distribution of specific neurotransmitter systems, and actions of specific drugs and their effects on behavior, mood, and thought processes. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain how neurotransmitters and hormones act in the body, and apply principles of psychopharmacology. 2. Evaluate different methods of psychopharmacological research. 3. Demonstrate understanding of general principles of drug abuse and addiction. 4. Apply principles of psychopharmacology to the etiology and treatment of psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3710 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA (odd).

PSY 4000. History of Psychology. 3 Hours.

Required of Psychology majors. An examination of the philosophical issues that have troubled psychology as a science, such as determinism and free will, conscious and unconscious processed, the possibility and efficacy of self-knowledge, behaviorism vs. mentalism, and the relation of mind and brain. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explore the history of psychology and the relation to current understanding of the field. 2. Identify key figures and key issues regarding past practices in psychology. 3. Build an understanding of how research and history impact modern practices in psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 (Grade C or higher), AND completed at least 75 credit hours, AND Psychology major, Psychology minor or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology; OR instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 4010. Intro to Program Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Designed to provide an overview of the program evaluation process; topics include an examination of models, theory, and techniques used in program evaluation. Content includes experimental design, qualitative approaches, cost analysis, public program evaluation, and ethics. Prerequisites PSY 3000 AND PSY 3010 or equivalent (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. Offered upon sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the major theories and models related to program evaluation. 2. Identify strengths and weaknesses of different program evaluation methods. 3. Identify, explain, and/or list the steps involved in program evaluation. 4. Effectively write a program evaluation plan. 5. Discuss, explain, list, and/or identify the ethical, aspects of evaluation. 6. Describe how program evaluation can be applied in workplaces and educational institutions. FA (odd).

PSY 4120. Testing and Measurement. 3 Hours.

Survey of methods, techniques, and instruments for measuring individual differences in behavior, a critical analysis of representative tests, values and limitations of test, methods of test selection. Evaluation, interpretation, and uses of standardized tests of aptitude, intelligence, achievement, and personality. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe fundamental knowledge of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, historical trends related to psychological testing and measurement. 2. Identify social and ethical challenges, including possible resolutions related to psychological testing and measurement. 3. Describe how statistical applications such as reliability and validity are crucial in the development of psychological testing and measurement. 4. Describe how culture and diversity differences affect psychological testing and measurement. Prerequisites: PSY 3010. FA (odd).

PSY 4130. Interpersonal Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Biological/Cognitive Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Introduction to theoretical perspective in interpersonal neuroscience employed in developmental psychology and in the study of interpersonal experiences. This course will also explore the neural mechanisms of emotion, personality and mood as they relate to interpersonal interaction. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the core concepts associated with attachment theory. 2. Investigate the relationship between trauma, neurological development, and neurological/interpersonal functioning. 3. Examine the neural mechanisms associated with emotion, personality, and mood as they relate to interpersonal interaction. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 or BIO 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA.

PSY 4140. Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Biological/Cognitive Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. Cognitive neuroscience uses neuroimaging techniques such as PET and fMRI to examine issues related to the mind/brain. This course covers such topics as perception and encoding, cerebral lateralization and specialization, the control of action, executive function, and the problem of consciousness. Completion of PSY 3120 is recommended before enrolling in this course. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply the dual fields of cognitive psychology and neuroscience. 2. Explain cognitive phenomena such as perception, memory and decision-making. 3. Understand the use of neuroscience techniques as applied to the study of cognition. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA (odd).

PSY 4145. Cognitive Neuroscience of Attention. 3 Hours.

Utilizing behavioral and biological techniques, including neuroimaging, genetics and single-cell neural recordings, students will develop an understanding of the mechanisms, development and effects of attention and be able to apply this understanding to a variety of human populations and situations. Students are recommended to take PSY 2000 before taking this course, but it is not required. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze current research relating to attention and the neural mechanisms behind attentional processes. 2. Develop an understanding of key attentional concepts and theories. 3. Describe techniques used in studying the cognitive neuroscience of attention and how these techniques lead to conclusions about the nature of attention. Prerequisites: PSY 3120, PSY 4140, OR PSY 4150 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies major with Psychology or Biology emphasis; or instructor permission.

PSY 4150. Sensation & Perception. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Biological/Cognitive Psychology requirement for Psychology majors. The anatomical and physiological bases of sensation will be reviewed. Moreover, traditional and contemporary theories of perception will be critically considered. How we see, hear, feel pain and temperature, and in general receive information from the environment; how our perceptions are affected by expectancy, knowledge, and higher-level organizational factors. Students will be expected to master basic concepts of sensory and perceptual function. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Build an understanding of relevant theoretical concepts relating to perception research and applications. 2. Assess the scientific process used in studying perception. 3. Identify and discuss relevant neural processes and the stimuli that produce those neural processes used in perception. Prerequisite: PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3120 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA (even).

PSY 4200. Psychology of Morality. 3 Hours.

Reviews recent and ongoing theory and research to explore how and why morality influences our judgments and actions with a specific emphasis on the relative roles of evolved emotions and of principled reasoning in moral processes. This course will incorporate evidence and argument from the fields of evolutionary biology, philosophy, anthropology, social neuroscience, and social psychology to explore the effects of moral thinking and feeling on topics such as economic and legal decision making, political affiliation, helping behavior, aggression and social deviance. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Analyze the relative influence of biology, psychology, personality, and culture on moral thoughts, feelings, and actions. 2. Relate personal experiences to fundamental theories and concepts in the psychology of morality. 3. Appraise and critique diverse perspectives on morality. 4. Formulate a system of morality that incorporates multiple theories and perspectives. Prerequisites: PSY 1010; AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (all grade C or higher); AND Psychology majors, Psychology minor, Biology majors, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; AND Advanced standing; or instructor permission. SP (even).

PSY 4300. Introduction to Counseling & Psychotherapy. 4 Hours.

Designed to familiarize students with theories of counseling and psychotherapy with an emphasis on the major models within the field. Theories will be critically evaluated, contrasted, and applied to a range of psychological problems and diverse populations. Students will also explore the historical background and developmental precipitants of each theory as well as the multicultural strengths and weaknesses of each counseling approach. Opportunity is provided to practice and refine counseling skills. Highly recommended for students interested in pursuing a counseling related profession. Combined lecture/lab. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 or BIO 3110; AND PSY 3400 (all grade C or higher); AND Advanced standing; AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 4350. Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy. 3 Hours.

Introduce students to the field of marriage and family therapy. This includes the history, theory, prominent clinicians, therapeutic topics and techniques. Survey and comparative analysis of modern and postmodern approaches to family will be included. Both the theory and procedures of each modality will be addressed. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Articulate what it means to have a systemic perspective in understanding and assessing family dynamics. 2. Differentiate through application basic concepts and techniques of established models of family therapy. 3. Identify and conceptualize common topics (e.g., depression) and issues (e.g., family conflict) in family therapy. 4. Analyze the pros and cons of the field of MFT compared to other fields of psychotherapy. Prerequisite: PSY 1100 or FSHD 1500 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology majors, Psychology minor, Biology Majors, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology. FA (even).

PSY 4440. Addiction. 3 Hours.

Provides students with the opportunity to explore the many issues related to the various forms and processes of addiction, focusing on etiology, assessment, treatment, and legal issues with regard to addiction. Students will also have the opportunity to learn about social and community resources designed to aid recovery. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Investigate current research regarding etiology of addiction. 2. Assess current evidence based treatments for addiction. 3. Describe current social and community resources for addiction prevention and treatment. 4. Discuss professional ethical issues associated with treatment and use of diagnostic and screening tools. Prerequisites: PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3400 or PSY 3460; (Grade C or higher) AND Psychology majors, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology majors, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. FA.

PSY 4510. Industrial-Organizational Psychology. 3 Hours.

Examines current issues in industrial-organizational psychology, specifically the relationship between people and the world of work. Topics include the history and methodology of industrial-organizational psychology, employment process, job analysis, testing and selection, performance appraisals, training, work motivation, job satisfaction, leadership, organizational development, and job stress. Successful students will gain a working knowledge of classic and cutting-edge topics in this field. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, historical trends related industrial-organizational psychology. 2. Identify social and ethical challenges, including possible resolutions related to industrial-organizational psychology. 3. Describe how industrial-organizational psychology affects the workplace via employee recruitment, hiring, and retention. Prerequisites: PSY 1010 or PSY 1010A (Grade C or higher); AND PSY 2000 or BIOL 3110 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Biology major, or Integrated Studies Emphasis in Psychology or Biology; or instructor permission. SP.

PSY 4520. Psychobiology. 3 Hours.

Psychobiology is a four credit senior-level course with a laboratory. Nerve cell conduction, neurotransmission, and neuroanatomy are investigated in the context of human cognition and behavior through lecture, discussion, neural simulation, and lab dissection. A research-based approach is used throughout the course, and students complete research projects in lab using neural simulation software. Ethical issues in brain research are integrated into discussions when relevant. Prerequisites: PSY 3710 OR BIOL 2420 (either Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3000 OR BIOL 3150 (either Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies major with Psychology or Biology emphasis. Corequisites: PSY 4525 or BIOL 4525. FA (even).

PSY 4525. Psychobiology Lab. 1 Hour.

Lab portion of PSY 4520/BIOL 4520. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: PSY 3710 OR BIOL 2420 (either Grade C or higher); AND PSY 3000 OR BIOL 3150 (either Grade C or higher); AND Psychology major, Psychology minor, Health Psychology minor, Biology major, or Integrated Studies major with Psychology or Biology emphasis. Corequisites: PSY 4520 or BIOL 4520. FA (even).

PSY 4800R. Directed Research I. 1-3 Hours.

Students will work on a specific research project under the direction of a faculty member. Student involvement will depend on the student's preparation and interest. Completion of the course will require a paper (using supporting scientific sources, in APA style) related to the research problem. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Apply the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, and historical trends in psychology to research design. 2. Apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation. 3. Apply the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes. 4. Describe how psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 4801R. Directed Research II. 1-3 Hours.

Students will work on a specific research project under the direction of a faculty member. Student involvement will depend on the student's preparation and interest. Completion of the course will require a paper (using supporting scientific sources, in APA style) related to the research problem. Prerequisite: PSY 4800R (Grade C or higher), and Instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 4802R. Directed Research III. 1-3 Hours.

Students will work on a specific research project under the direction of a faculty member. Student involvement will depend on the student's preparation and interest. Completion of the course will require a paper (using supporting scientific sources, in APA style) related to the research problem. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP.

PSY 4810R. Internships and Field Experience. 1-3 Hours.

Application of psychological principles in community settings with supervision by faculty member and qualified personnel at cooperating agencies. Requires a contract agreed upon by student, agency supervisor, and faculty sponsor. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Critique the connections between their work experience and the content of psychology. 2. Demonstrate professional skills and attitudes toward professional etiquette. 3. Apply theories learned in course studies in a professional setting. 4. Select a clear direction in their education and career path. FA, SP.

PSY 4860R. Psychology Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Students work in local or regional agencies or institutions by observing or participating in professional activities under appropriate supervision. Repeatable up to 9 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FA, SP, SU.

PSY 4910. Capstone Research in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Psychology Capstone requirement. Requires consolidation of information, skills, and knowledge learned throughout students' undergraduate studies, particularly in the Psychology Core and research areas, to conduct independent research to further develop their understanding of Psychology as a science. Course fee required. Prerequisite: PSY 3010 (Grade C or higher); AND Psychology Major; AND Senior standing. FA, SP.

PSY 4920. Capstone Seminar in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Fulfills Psychology Capstone requirement. Requires that students write an APA-style review paper about an area of Psychology in which they have an occupational interest, engage in a collaborative research project, and create a professional planning portfolio containing the documents necessary for them to enter the workforce or gain admittance to graduate school. Prerequisite: PSY 3010 (Grade C or higher); Psychology major; and Senior standing. FA, SP.

PSY 4990R. Psychology Seminar: Advanced Topics. 3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in Psychology. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. Grades will be based on student papers and/or exams. Active participation in class discussions may also contribute toward a student's grade. The specific topic of this course will be approved by the department chair and will comply with university policy regarding the course credit offered. This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Instructor permission may be required at the request of the instructor. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explore special advanced topics in the field of Psychology. 2. Investigate theories and practices related to this topic. 3. Apply concepts of this topic to realistic and experiential contexts. Prerequisites: Psychology major OR Integrated Studies major with Psychology emphasis; AND Senior standing; OR instructor permission.