Sociology (SOC)

Courses

SOC 1010. Introduction to Sociology (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social & Behavioral Sciences General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Teaches what sociology is, what a sociologist does, and how sociology is applied, including the study of cultures, socialization, stratification, religion, families, organizations and social change through lectures, guest speakers, film, writing assignments, and exams. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an ability to identify ideas, people, and events that are generally thought to be important by sociologist. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of sociology as a scientific discipline (i.e. gathering and analyzing of empirical data in a systematic fashion). 3. Demonstrate an understanding of functionalism, conflict, and symbolic interactionism as the major theoretical perspectives of sociology. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of the five main institutions of society (family, religion, education, economy, and politics) from a sociological perspective. FA, SP, SU.

SOC 1020. Social Problems (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social & Behavioral Sciences General Education requirement and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Studies contemporary social issues dealing with crime, sexuality, drug abuse, violence, and families, in addition to larger social problems such as war, poverty, race and ethnic relations, population and the environment through lectures, guest speakers, film, writing assignments, and exams. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Cultivate a "sociological imagination." 2. Assess the underlying causes of social problems. 3. Identify the theoretical frameworks used in the analysis of current social problems, i.e. functionalist, conflict, feminist, and/or interactionist perspectives. 4. Explore social indicators to determine the prevalence of social problems. 5. Demonstrate an understanding of the sociology of social problems as a scientific discipline i.e. the gathering of and analyzing of empirical data in a systematic prescribed fashion. 6. Explain the role of institutions in the creation and/or resolution of various social problems. 7. Demonstrate an understanding of the ideas, people, and events that are generally thought to be important by sociologists of social problems. 8. Investigate perceived inequality associated with social class, race, ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation. 9. Examine potential solutions to identified social issues. FA, SP.

SOC 1200. Sociology of the Family (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fulfills General Education Social & Behavioral Sciences requirement, and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Teaches what sociology is and how sociology is applied to the study of families, covering many different aspects of including families through history, gender roles, love, sexuality, courtship, marriage, parenting, children, racial-ethnic families, families and work, family violence, separation and divorce, and aging in the family through lectures, guest speakers, film, writing assignments, and exams. Offered based on sufficient student need. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an ability to identify the ideas, people, and events that are generally thought to be important by family sociologists. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of the study of the family as a scientific endeavor i.e. the gathering and analyzing of empirical data in a systematic fashion. 3. Demonstrate an understanding the family from the perspectives of the three major sociological perspectives i.e. structural-functionalists theory, symbolic interaction theory, conflict theory, and others. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of the diversity of family types and experiences across the family life course from a sociological perspective.

SOC 2370. Gender in Contemporary Society (SS). 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social & Behavioral Sciences General Education requirement. Introduction to the core sociological concepts of gender in contemporary society. It explores what sociologists mean by the concept of gender and how they observe and measure it. Furthermore, it gives students an understanding of the centrality of gender to the sociologist's perspective of social life, as well as underscoring the ways gender can be maintained and can also be organically and forcefully changed within society and the interactive effects they have on peoples' lives. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an ability to identify the ideas, people, and events that are generally thought to be important by sociologists of gender. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of sociology as a scientific discipline, i.e. the gathering and analyzing of empirical data in a systematic fashion. 3. Demonstrate an understanding gender from the view of the major sociological perspectives: functionalism, conflict, and symbolic interactionism. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of the five main institutions of society i.e. family, religion, education, economy, and politics and their roles in the construction of gender in contemporary society.

SOC 2630. Sociology of Racial and Ethnic Relations (SS). 3 Hours.

Fulfills Social and Behavioral Sciences General Education requirement. Introduces students to the core sociological concepts of race and ethnic relations in contemporary society. Explores what sociologists mean by the concept of multiculturalism and how they observe and measure it. Furthermore, it gives students an understanding of the centrality of race and ethnicity to the sociologist's perspective of social life; as well as underscoring the ways minority status can be maintained and can also be organically and forcefully changed within society and the interactive effects they have on peoples' lives. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an ability to identify the ideas, people, and events that are generally thought to be important by sociologists of race and ethnicity. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of sociology as a scientific discipline, i.e. the gathering and analyzing of empirical data in a systematic fashion. 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the five main institutions of society, i.e. family, religion, education, economy, and politics and their roles in the construction of race and ethnicity in contemporary society. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of race and ethnicity from the view of the major sociological perspectives, i.e. functionalism, conflict, and symbolic interactionism.

SOC 3010. Stratification and Inequality. 3 Hours.

Examines theories of and research concerning explanations of the causes of social, economic, and political stratification and inequality, including consequences of inequality for individuals and groups. This course will examine the roles of race, gender and class in systems of stratification and inequality. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Be aware of the roots of inequality. 2. Explain how the dimensions of stratification grow as societies become larger and more powerful. 3. Identify the challenges of inequality. 4. Explain the intersections of culture with the dimensions of stratification/inequality. 5. Describe the seriousness and ramifications of social research that is incorrectly employed to justify stratification policy adoption. 6. Analyze social problems using sociological theory and context with various forms of research. 7. Investigate research methods associated with social class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, politics, and/or economic issues. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher). FA, SP.

SOC 3020. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Open to all students. Course covers sociological social psychological perspectives such as phenomenology, exchange, rational choice, dramaturgy, ethnomethodology, and symbolic interactionism. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an ability to identify the ideas, people, and events that are generally thought to be important by social psychologists. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of social psychology as a scientific discipline, i.e. the gathering and analyzing of empirical data in a systematic fashion. 3. Demonstrate an understanding of symbolic interactionism as a major theoretical perspective of a sociological social psychology. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of objects, symbols, self, mind, and society as the major concepts used by symbolic interactionists for understanding human behaviors. 5. Demonstrate an ability to apply the above symbolic interactionist concepts to specific empirical arenas. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher). FA.

SOC 3041. Sociology of Rock Music. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the cultural and structural aspects of rock music as an art world. As such, it will examine the music as an ongoing creation of people in many parts of society: artists, engineers, club owners, audience members, and critics to name just a few. The course will also look at visual, lyrical, and musical codes that define and distinguish rock music from other genres of music. Historical and cross-cultural examples of rock will include studies from various time periods and countries as well as how race, class, and gender are integral to an understanding of this art form. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic sociological perspectives as they relate to rock music. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of the methods in which sociologists study rock music. 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the culture and structure of rock music. 4. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the history of rock music. SP (odd).

SOC 3111. Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Introduces the research methods and designs by which Sociologists father and analyze data, including the common research methods of interviews, surveys, and observation, among others. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the choices available to social researchers. 2. Explain 'do s' and 'don'ts' when employing a particular approach to collecting or analyzing data. 3. Identify how research methods connect with research questions. 4. Explain how adopted skills from training in research methods are transferable. 5. Describe the seriousness and ramifications of social research that is incorrectly employed. 6. Identify the contrast between quantitative, qualitative, and mixed method research. 7. Investigate research methods associated with social class, race, ethnicity, and/or economic issues. Prerequisite: SOC 1010. SP.

SOC 3112. Social Statistics. 3 Hours.

Students will learn to use and interpret statistical analysis. Includes descriptive statistics (i.e., frequency distributions, graphs, central tendency, variability), examination of relationship between variables (bivariate regression, correlation), and a discussion of inferential statistics (t-test, ANOVA, chi-square). **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain key statistical concepts such as logic of statistical influence, estimation with intervals, and testing for significance. 2. Interpret basic statistics and statistical output correctly, effectively, and in different contexts. 3. Compute basic statistics. 4. Conduct introductory-level data analysis using SPSS. 5. Think critically about data-based claims within and beyond academia. Prerequisites: SOC 1010 AND MATH 1040 (both Grade C or higher). SP.

SOC 3113. Survey Research and Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

Survey Research is designed to prepare students to understand, conduct, and analyze surveys and present the findings. This course will be particularly useful to assist students who are considering, planning or currently working on research projects with a survey component. Upon the completion of the course, students should be able to decide whether and when surveys are appropriate means of data collection, have a good idea of how to put together a survey, conduct basic quantitative analysis of survey data, and report the findings. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the fundamentals of regression analysis, including dummy variables and interactions; nonlinear relationships; and indirect effects. 2. Exhibit the ability to diagnose and remedy issues in regression models. 3. Exhibit ability to apply appropriate regression techniques to study a research topic of their own interest. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher). SP.

SOC 3114. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the many types of qualitative research methods within sociology. Students will learn about and actively administer field work and interview techniques among other types of methods. The collection, analysis, and interpretation of gathered data will be emphasized. Course offered in rotation. Consult class schedule. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of the place of qualitative methods in the overall canon of sociological research. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of the ethics surrounding the use of qualitative research methods. 3. Demonstrate an understanding of qualitative research methods as ways of gathering and analyzing empirical data in a systematic fashion. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of objects, symbols, self, mind, and society as the major concepts used by symbolic interactionists for understanding human behaviors. 5. Demonstrate an ability to apply the above symbolic interactionist concepts to specific empirical arenas. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher).

SOC 3140. Sociological Theory. 3 Hours.

Examines the variety of perspectives and theories unique to Sociology as a discipline which provide differing perspectives of social structure, culture, and interaction. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of the ideas, people, and events that are generally thought to be important by theoretical sociologists. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of the sociology not only as a scientific discipline but as a theoretical one as well. 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the various theoretical perspectives sociologists use to understand the human condition. Prerequisite: SOC 1010. FA.

SOC 3435. Globalization. 3 Hours.

Examines and critiques the historical origins, economic and technological foundations, institutional arrangements, ideological underpinnings, collective movements, and controversial outcomes of 'transnationalism', and 'globalization.' Sociological analysis emphasizes macro-level institutions that shape globalization and social conflicts arising from its effects. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the theories of globalization. 2. Explain the basic elements of a global economy. 3. Exhibit the ability to Identify the significance of political globalization: power, transnational politics, global governance and the state. 4. Explain how the relationship between globalization, culture, and global communications are interrelated. 5. Exhibit the ability to describe the seriousness and ramifications of transnational social movements/transnational civil society---transnationalism, transnational communities, and transnational families. 6. Exhibit the ability to identify how globalization is influencing women/gender issues. 7. Illustrate the ability to analyze social problems that are being realized---transnational migration/globalization and race/ethnicity. 8. Exhibit the ability to investigate global-local linkages: the new global inequalities---global supernumeraries. Prerequisite: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher). FA (odd).

SOC 3440. Sociology of Religion. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to familiarize students with important sociological theories and empirical research on religion. Students will learn how religion intersects with other major social institutions such as family, politics, and education. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the classical and contemporary theories in the sociology of religion. 2. Explain how religion is measured and studied in sociological research. 3. Critically analyze sociological research on religion and apply their knowledge to address questions of their own interest. Prerequisites: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher). FA.

SOC 3550. Organizations in Society. 3 Hours.

Examines the culture and structure of formal organizations: organizational forms; bureaucracies; coordination of work; organizational control, autonomy and control, culture, conflict, diversity, and change. Sociological theories about modern organizations and the impact of new technologies will be examined. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Exhibit the ability to explain the basic components of the theoretical perspectives in a given societal organizational form. 2. Explain the Relational Organizational Form. 3. Explain the Bureaucratic Organizational Form. 4. Explain the Coordination of Work. 5. Exhibit the ability to describe the autonomy and control that exists in a given society. 6. Exhibit the ability to identify the variables that are present in a given organizational culture. 7. Exhibit the ability to analyze organizational conflict and what and why certain factors encourage disruption in an organization. 8. Explain how to investigate diversity within organizations associated with social class, race, ethnicity, and/or economic issues. 9. Explain how organizational learning and change are utilized in a given society. 10. Explain how new technologies, social media, and emerging communities will likely effect current and future organizations. Prerequisite: SOC 1010. FA.

SOC 3560. Deviance and Social Control. 3 Hours.

Introduces the various perspectives and theories dealing with deviance and social control, including an examination of the ways in which people perceive and deal with what are seen as cultural norms. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an ability to identify the ideas, people, and events that are generally thought to be important by sociologists of deviance and social control. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of sociology as a scientific discipline i.e. the gathering and analyzing of empirical data in a systematic fashion and how such a science is used to study deviant behavior. 3. Demonstrate an understanding of basic sociological theoretical concepts relating to deviance such as conflict, functionalism, symbolic interactionism, labeling, and differential association. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of the major creators of sociological theories. Prerequisite: SOC 1010.

SOC 4800R. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Students work one-on-one with a sociology faculty member on a project agreeable to both. The project depends on the interests of the student and faculty member. Completion of the course requires a paper related to the project. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate a deep understanding of particular sociologists, sociological methodologies, and/or sociological theories as determined by the student and advisor. 2. Demonstrate an ability to link above mentioned sociologists, methodologies, and/or theories to the larger sociological canon. Prerequisites: SOC 1010 (Grade C or higher) and instructor permission required.

SOC 4860R. Sociology Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Students will observe and/or participate in professional activities under the direct or indirect supervision of Applied Sociology faculty. Repeatable up to 9 credits. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Formulate a knowledge of how key theories, ideas, and processes related to the study of sociology are applied in professional and research settings. 2. Distinguish among a range of sociological methods for conducting research in professional and research settings.

SOC 4890. Applied Sociology Internship. 3 Hours.

Students will apply knowledge they've learned in Applied Sociology courses to an organizational setting in which they actively participate. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Explain the knowledge learned in previously Applied Sociology courses and apply that knowledge in an organization in which they participate. Prerequisites: Applied Sociology major, Senior standing; SOC 1010, SOC 3111, SOC 3112, SOC 3140 (all Grade C or higher), and instructor permission.

SOC 4910. Senior Capstone. 3 Hours.

Fulfills the Sociology capstone requirement to earn a BA/BS degree. In this course, students will undertake a well-defined research project involving primary and/or secondary data analysis. The final product for the capstone will be a paper of "publishable quality" combined with an end-of-semester presentation. **COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLOs) At the successful conclusion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Develop an original research project, using either a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods approach. 2. Show an understanding of the appropriate steps of doing independent research, including proposal and development of a research topic and question, literature review, and collection and analysis of data. 3. Create a final product in written form appropriate to the project in combination with an end-of-semester presentation. Prerequisites: SOC 1010 and SOC 3111 and SOC 3112 and SOC 3140 and SOC 4890 (all Grade C or higher), and Senior standing. SP.