Heath & Human Performance

Physical Ed. Health & Rec Courses

PEHR 1003. Sport and Performance Psychology. 1 Hour.

For students interested in psychological skills training. This course is designed to help students maximize their performance through mental skills training. In particular, tis course will help students understand the building blocks for success, know what it means to be ready to play, and learn strategies to more effectively prepare for performance. This course is recommended for student-athletes, performing artists, musicians, and all other students looking to improve their performance.

PEHR 1340. Lifeguarding. 2 Hours.

Activity course for students interested in furthering their knowledge and skills in swimming and getting their lifeguard training. Instruction is given in water rescue, water safety and skills. This course includes the Red Cross Exam, and successful students will be Red Cross certified. Students must demonstrate proficiency in two basic strokes (American Crawl and breaststroke). Course fee required. FA, SP.

PEHR 1543. First Aid / Resp Emergencies. 3 Hours.

Designed for students desiring to learn about first aid, including instruction in the principles and practices in emergency care and first aid procedures for injuries and safety precautions. Successful completers will be certified through the American Red Cross in CPR and First Aid. FA, SP.

PEHR 2020. Introduction to Exercise Science. 3 Hours.

For students interested in exercise science. Course surveys the anatomical, physiological, nutritional, psychological, biomechanical, and developmental foundations of exercise science as an academic discipline. Careers and professional responsibilities within the exercise science field are also a focus of this course. FA, SP.

PEHR 2060. Sport and Exercise Psychology. 3 Hours.

For students interested in sport and exercise psychology. A study of the effects of psychological factors on performance in sport and exercise settings, including, but not limited to motivation, stress, leadership, group/team dynamics, imagery, and concentration. Course also covers the effects of sport/exercise participation on psychological well-being. FA, SP.

PEHR 2080. Management in Exercise & Health Promotion. 3 Hours.

Course provides knowledge essential to the operation of fitness centers. Practical skills related to the management of commercial and corporate fitness/wellness centers will be the primary focus of this course.

PEHR 2120. Principles of Fitness and Lifestyle Management. 3 Hours.

Emphasize issues relative to fitness in youth/adult fitness, aging, physical activity program design and implementation, attrition, behavior modification, and the role of exercise in disease prevention and/or management. The goal is to promote fitness across an entire lifespan. SP.

PEHR 2200. Nutrition for Sport and Exercise. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the scientific foundations of sports nutrition. Areas of emphasis include basic nutritional concepts, energy expenditure during different types of exercise, optimal diets for various training and activities, timing and composition of pre and post competition meals, the use of nutritional supplements and ergogenic aids, and the specific needs of different athletic populations. The course can provide beneficial information to the recreational or competitive athlete, and to any individual wishing to incorporate nutrition in their active lifestyle. SP.

PEHR 2992. Seminar in Physical Education. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

PEHR 2993. Seminar in Physical Education. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Fees may be required for some seminar courses and instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

PEHR 2994. Seminar in Physical Education. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other nontraditional instruction methods. Note that this course in an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Instructor permission will be optional at the request of the instructor.

PEHR 3000. Psychophysiology of Fitness and Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Provides students with an understanding of the interaction between psychological processes, nutritional practices and physiological adaptations associated with physical activity and nutritional practices.

PEHR 3052. Psychophysiology of Motor Control. 3 Hours.

Surveys the basic principles of control of human movement, including neuro-mechanics of human movement. These principles will be taught through application to sport, joint movement, and activities of daily living. Course fee required.

PEHR 3350. Motor Learning and Development. 3 Hours.

A study of how the development of physiological, perceptual, neurological, intellectual, and emotional factors affect motor learning. Knowledge from this course provides a framework for the establishment of programs that facilitate skill acquisition for all learners with a focus on children and adolescents. This course is required on most Exercise Science and/or Kinesiology degree plans. It is also a prerequisite for many graduate programs in Exercise Science, or physical/occupational therapy. FA.

PEHR 3370. Exercise Testing and Prescription. 3 Hours.

Teaches key concepts related to exercise testing and program design for healthy and diseased populations. Furthermore, usage of teams, groups, and individualized assessment and programming based activities will be used to explore principles in anatomy, exercise physiology, behavior modification, motivation, health promotion, fitness assessment and prescription. Prerequisites: PEHR 3700 and PEHR 3705 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

PEHR 3400. Activity Programming for Special Populations. 3 Hours.

A comprehensive look at providing high-quality fitness, physical education, sport, and outdoor adventure experiences for individuals with disabilities. Students will learn best practices and applications for inclusion in classroom settings, as well as discover how to develop individualized fitness, competitive sport, and outdoor adventure experiences for individuals with special needs. This course is required on most Exercise Science and/or Kinesiology degree plans. It is also pre-requisite for many graduate programs in Exercise Science. FA.

PEHR 3500. Theories and Techniques for Teaching Fitness and Motor Skills. 3 Hours.

Content in this course will prepare students to design and implement quality physical education programs for elementary and secondary school students. In addition to developing the knowledge and skills to select and implement developmentally appropriate activities for children/adolescents, students enrolled in the course will also develop an understanding of curriculum design, public school policy and procedures (as related to P.E.), as well as national standards and guidelines affecting physical education programming. The curriculum is designed to meet the academic needs of Fitness trainers, community recreation directors, and physical education teachers in the public and private sector will benefit from the curriculum. In addition, the knowledge and skills developed in this course will address material covered in the Praxis exam. FA.

PEHR 3510. Applied Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Focuses on an applied perspective of exercise physiology, designed to provide physical educators, coaches, and exercise professionals with the scientific foundations of exercise pertaining to areas such as energy metabolism, cardiovascular and neuromuscular physiology, nutrition, etc. with direct application in schools, health clubs and sport settings. SP (even).

PEHR 3700. Physiology of Exercise. 3 Hours.

This course provides a further overview of the physiology of exercise. It builds on the students' knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, and further focuses on the acute and chronic physiological adaptations of exercise on the human body. Various responses of functional systems, different populations, ergogenic aids, chronic diseases, physical activity, health and wellness, and environmental conditions will also be described from a physiological perspective. Prerequisite: BIOL 2320 and BIOL 2325 (Grade C- or higher); and BIOL 2420 and BIOL 2425 (Grade C- or higher). Corequisite: PEHR 3705. FA, SP.

PEHR 3705. Physiology of Exercise Lab. 1 Hour.

A supplemental course to PEHR 3700, Physiology of Exercise. Emphasizes the demonstration of lecture concepts through hands on experiences. Assessments include maximal oxygen consumption, aerobic and anaerobic fitness assessment, body composition analysis, and pulmonary function testing in regards to chronic and acute exercise. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: BIOL 2320 and BIOL 2325 (Grade C- or higher); BIOL 2420 and BIOL 2425 (Grade C- or higher). Corequisite: PEHR 3700. FA, SP.

PEHR 3730. Biomechanics. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the investigation and application of the mechanical principles of movement relative to exercise and sport. Course includes an overview of the relationship of musculoskeletal anatomy to the mechanics of human movement. Methods of optimizing exercise and sport performance from a biomechanical perspective will also be addressed. FA (odd), SP.

PEHR 3740. Clinical Biomechanics. 3 Hours.

Provides an introduction to the mechanical principles relevant to the understanding of human motion in the context of clinical populations, movement pathologies, and therapy. The focus will be on the mechanics and anatomical geometry of human movement, as well as muscular control and mechanics. SU.

PEHR 3800. Measurement & Evaluation in Physical Exercise & Sports. 3 Hours.

Provides students with the foundation of knowledge needed for administering and interpreting results from popular health and skill-related physical fitness tests. Test selection, administration, and interpretation will be emphasized. Students will use popular assessment instruments for data collection and computer analysis. FA, SP.

PEHR 3820. Sport Science and Technology. 3 Hours.

This course explores the current state of science and technology in sport, both for performance and safety. Materials and design of equipment will be covered, as well as new technologies and instrumentation for tracking performance and risk factors. Additionally, the use of common technology such as "smartphones" and video will be explored. Basic computer software and methods for analyzing everyday sporting data with excel and other computing tools will be introduced. Students will be exposed to data collection and analysis using tools that are available to consumers, sport enthusiasts, and researchers.

PEHR 4100. Physiology and Techniques of Strength and Power. 3 Hours.

Covers physiological principles and training techniques used in strength and conditioning. A large emphasis is placed on the guidelines from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) with an aim for preparing students to ultimately take the NSCA Certified Personal Trainer or NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist exam. Prerequisites: PEHR 3700 and PEHR 3705 (Grade C- or higher). SP.

PEHR 4200. Healthy Aging. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes the basic physiological changes in older adults. Methods to improve the quality of life among older adults will be stressed. Additional content will include elements of health promotion, wellness programming, behavior change, lifelong learning and development, and relevant research findings pertaining to older adults. FA.

PEHR 4230. Applied Fitness Development for Aging and At-Risk Populations. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to develop and provide fitness programs for at-risk populations and older adults. Course objectives include health related fitness assessments, interpretation and counseling based on results of fitness assessments, and the construction of individually tailored exercise prescriptions to meet the clients' unique needs and goals. SP.

PEHR 4300. Clinical Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes information and skills related to exercise testing and prescription in healthy and clinical populations. Teaches American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) exercise testing guidelines. Prerequisites: PEHR 3700 and PEHR 3705 (Grade C- or higher). FA.

PEHR 4400. Pediatric and Adolescent Fitness & Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Provides future exercise science professionals with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to provide appropriate fitness and nutritional guidelines for the physiological responses and demands unique to children and adolescents. Appropriate measurement techniques to evaluate this population will also be covered. SP.

PEHR 4500. Theories of Behavioral Change. 3 Hours.

Focuses on behavior change theory, principles, and predictive models, with their application to health behavior change programs and interventions.

PEHR 4600R. Exercise Science Internship. 1-3 Hours.

Designed to provide students with hands-on professional experience in the field of exercise science. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits toward graduation. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

PEHR 4700. Motivation and Coaching. 3 Hours.

Course covers knowledge and theory related to coaching principles relative to sport psychology, sport pedagogy, and sport management. Also covers the integration of basic coaching skills into the work of health-care/fitness professionals to help clients achieve self-determined goals related to health and wellness.

Population Health Courses

HLTH 2010. Health & Disease. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the science of health and disease, both communicable and non-communicable, including history, etiology, prevalence, symptoms, treatment and ways to prevent disease and protect health across the lifespan. FA, SP.

HLTH 2700. Consumer Health Issues. 3 Hours.

This course examines factors associated with the marketplace for health-related products and services. Topics will include medical quackery, fraudulent health practices; laws and agencies protecting the consumer. FA, SP.

HLTH 3010. Population & Community Health. 3 Hours.

Highlights the concepts of population health and interdisciplinary collaboration for health and the basic processes and interventions used to address the health needs of communities. The course will also introduce students to the history, philosophy, functions and core values of public health in the U.S. and the world. FA, SP.

HLTH 3020. U.S. & World Health Systems. 3 Hours.

Provides students with a comprehensive survey of the organization and management of the US health care system, including history, regulation, structure, economics, operations, and current issues, as well as a comparison of health systems worldwide. FA, SP.

HLTH 3040. Environmental Health. 3 Hours.

Provides a foundation for understanding how both natural and built environments affect human health. Topics will include human-environment interaction, pollution, sanitation, air, water and food quality, relationship to infectious disease, climate change and other current environmental health issues. FA, SP.

HLTH 3385. Healthcare Quality and Safety. 3 Hours.

Covers best practices relative to patient healthcare quality and safety. FA, SP.

HLTH 3500. Financial Analysis. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the fundamental principles and practices of accounting and finance needed by non-finance managers in health care organizations, including an introduction to budgeting, revenue and expenses, payroll, financial statements, and the economics of decision making. FA, SP.

HLTH 3600. Patient Navigation. 3 Hours.

This course will provide student with an understanding of the barriers to patient healthcare. In addition, this course will help students develop the skills and competencies to become an affective patient navigator. FA, SP.

HLTH 3750. Health Determinants & Disparities. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the biological, environmental, behavior, social and economic factors that influence individual and community health and disease; emphasis will be given to the interaction between these factors, including personal lifestyle decisions and social determinants of health. Students will also be introduced to the U.S. Health people, goals, objectives and measures. FA, SP.

HLTH 3800. Genetics & Disease. 3 Hours.

This course covers the principles of human genetics, including the mapping of disease genes, defects causing human disease, the cloning of disease genes, gene therapy, transgenes, and specific pathological disorders. FA, SP.

HLTH 3900. Infectious Disease. 3 Hours.

Course covers the basic concepts of infectious diseases and dynamics of disease transmission. From an initial review of some common terms, students progress into detailed discussions on how pathogens establish themselves within a host to sustain an infection. FA, SP.

HLTH 4010. Biostatistics & Epidemiology. 2 Hours.

Covers principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation and the use of classical statistical approaches to describe the health of populations. Dual listed with DHYG 4010. Students may only take one course for credit. FA, SP.

HLTH 4020. Research Methodology. 2 Hours.

Covers fundamental and working knowledge of scientific method employed in population health research. Students will perform critical analysis of research utilizing scientific method and evidence-based publications. Dual listed with DHYG 4020. Students may only take one course for credit. FA, SP.

HLTH 4030. Leadership & Group Dynamics. 2 Hours.

Focuses on the theories, concepts, and principles of leadership; emphasizes the development of leadership skills related to personal behavior, communication, organization, and self-examination; and explores the opportunity to develop leadership roles appropriate to the population health profession. Dual listed with DHYG 4030. Students may only take one course for credit. FA, SP.

HLTH 4300. Healthcare Marketing. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the fundamental marketing concepts and strategies as related to delivery of health care, including, market analysis, competition, marketing mix, promotional strategy, patient-consumer psychology, and regulatory limitations. FA, SP.

HLTH 4310. Health Promotion. 3 Hours.

Introduces the principles of health promotion, including community assessment, asset mapping, coalition building, and advocacy. Students will learn how to successfully plan and implement community-based programming and to evaluate its effectiveness. FA, SP.

HLTH 4400. Health Law & Policy. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes the basic legal, regulatory, economic and ethical issues impacting health care and public health systems, including the roles of various governmental agencies and branches. The course will also discuss advocacy and other methods to influence law and policy. FA, SP.

HLTH 4500. Global Health. 3 Hours.

Provides students with in-depth coverage of the social, cultural, economic, environmental, climatological and political issues that determine the health status of global populations and that can lead to disparities among nations. Course also highlights local and regional influences on global health and potential remedies. FA, SP.

HLTH 4790. Management of Healthcare Organizations & Strategy. 3 Hours.

This course focuses of management issues specific to health care organizations. Topics will include responding to market changes and patient expectations, adopting and creating innovation, analyzing and adapting to change to improve performance, job designs and roles in health care organizations, interdisciplinary team-based work, working within heath care regulation, integrating health care technology and other current topics. FA, SP.

HLTH 4910R. Population Health Capstone. 1-3 Hours.

Designed as an academic cumulative experience allowing students to demonstrate competence in integrating concepts across the curriculum and will include the creation of a professional project. Additionally, the course will prepare students for their professional internship experience and reinforce concepts such as ethics, professionalism, networking, organizational dynamics, teamwork and leadership. Prerequisites: HLOC 1000 and HLOC 1010 and HLTH 2010 and HLTH 3010 and HLTH 3020 and HLTH 4010 (all Grade C- or higher) and a cultural competence/diversity course. FA, SP.

HLTH 4920R. Population Health Internship. 1-6 Hours.

Course is designed to provide students with community-based practical experience that will allow them to observe real-life practice and provide opportunity to demonstrate mastery of professional skills in a health community setting. Prerequisites: Instructor permission required. FA, SP.

Recreation & Sport Management Courses

RSM 1110. Leisure in Society (SS, GC). 3 Hours.

Fullfills General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences and is an approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Focuses on conceptual foundations for understanding the role of leisure in the quality of life. The significance and meaning of leisure will be explored with emphasis on factors influencing leisure, analysis of leisure values, and the study of the social, historical, cultural, psychological, political, and economic points of view. FA, SP, SU.

RSM 2070. Fundamentals of Sport Management. 3 Hours.

Designed to provide students with fundamental knowledge and skills related to planning, organizing, directing, budgeting, and marketing sport venues and events. Best practices for sport management will be examined in the context of professional sports; collegiate, intercollegiate, and interscholastic sports; community and youth sports; and special events and festivals. FA, SP.

RSM 2500. Introduction to Recreation and Sport Management. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the recreation and sport management industry. The historical and philosophical perspectives of sport and leisure will be discussed with a specific emphasis on service areas and career options in recreation, sport and tourism. FA, SP.

RSM 2600. Recreation and Sport Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course will explore the development of knowledge related to leadership theory, group dynamics, and face-to-face leadership techniques. Students will gain an understanding of leadership theories as they are applied in a field setting. Course fee required. SP.

RSM 2700. Recreation Program Planning. 4 Hours.

Overview of the unique goals and challenges associated with the design, development, operations, and utilization of recreation facilities, including recreation centers, pools, water parks, playgrounds, parks, fitness centers, sports complexes, trails, resorts, and cemeteries. SP.

RSM 2800. Introduction to Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Hours.

Introduces the nonprofit sector and its role in developing cultural, economic, and social impact in society with specific focus on meeting the needs of youth, adults and underrepresented groups. FA (odd).

RSM 3000. Program and Experience Design. 3 Hours.

The course provides practical knowledge and experiences as it guides students through the assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation process for designing experiences through managing events and programs. Course fee required. FA, SP.

RSM 3010. Event Management. 3 Hours.

Designed to expose students to special event and festival management through planning, implementation, and evaluation with a service learning approach. SP.

RSM 3120. Sport and Society. 3 Hours.

Examines the contemporary issues in sport and the impact sport has on society. Topics will include the development of sport, institutions of sport, sport as a business, and socio-cultural concerns within American sports.

RSM 3201. Hospitality Management. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the hospitality and tourism industry with emphasis on lodging, food and beverage operations, leisure travel markets, convention services, and hospitality trends. SP (even).

RSM 3310. Leisure Behavior and Human Diversity. 3 Hours.

Exploration of issues related to leisure, recreation, and tourism behavior across a wide variety of dominant and non-dominant populations, including ethnicity, physical and intellectual ability, gender, age, religious and nationality identity, among many others. FA.

RSM 3430. Tourism and Commercial Enterprises. 3 Hours.

Introduction to commercial enterprises within recreation, sport and tourism profit-making or self-supporting organizations, including history, types of services, trends, careers, revenue management, services and products, and the relationship between business and leisure programs. SP.

RSM 3600. Intercollegiate Athletic Administration. 3 Hours.

The course provides a comprehensive view of management process such as hiring coaches, generating revenue, recruiting regulations, federal compliance, and ensuring the well-being of student-athletes. SP (odd).

RSM 3620. Resort Management. 3 Hours.

Surveys effective practices in managing tourism and resort recreation enterprises including operations, facility management, activities, and customer service. FA (even).

RSM 3820R. Practicum in Recreation and Sport. 1-3 Hours.

This repeatable course provides students with professional fieldwork experiences in the field of recreation and sport management. Offered intermittently based on student demand.

RSM 3860R. Global Sport and Leisure Perspectives. 3 Hours.

Explores global issues and perspectives within the sport and leisure industry through travel abroad trips that immerse students in the cultural, social, and political environments of foreign countries. Trip destinations and fees will vary year to year. Open to all majors. Additional cost will be required for trip expenses. Offered intermittently.

RSM 3900. Recreation and Sport Marketing. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of the application of recreation and sport marketing principles, techniques and sales. Focuses on research and development, marketing plans, promotion strategies, sponsorship, advertising, branding, and public relations within recreation, sport and tourism services. SP.

RSM 3950. Supervision and Human Resources in Recreation and Sport. 3 Hours.

Concepts and techniques of supervision and human resources will be explored with emphasis on recruitment, assignment, evaluation, motivation, and in-service training of personnel. FA.

RSM 3960. Special Topics in Recreation and Sport. 1-3 Hours.

Provides an opportunity to offer unique traditional and nontraditional instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses. Topics and content vary depending on student needs and instructor approval. Offered intermittently.

RSM 4000. Legal Foundations in Recreation and Sport. 3 Hours.

Covers the potential for legal issues regarding recreation and sport activities, including the nature of the programs and facilities, wide-ranging clientele, multitude of paid and volunteer staff. Risk management procedures to prevent unfortunate circumstances from occurring and how best to protect clientele and defend staff, administrators, programs, and agencies will be the focus. SP.

RSM 4010. Administration in Recreation and Sport. 4 Hours.

A summative course covering operations, philosophies, policies and procedures, personnel management, professional competence, management styles, personnel laws, financial analysis, working capital management, budgeting, cost of capital, and policy in recreation, sport and tourism agencies and businesses. Prerequisite: Successful completion or concurrent registration equivalent to any 9 semester credit hours in the program courses (RSM 2500-RSM 3900, Grade C or higher). SP.

RSM 4020. Sport Governance and Policy. 3 Hours.

Examines current governance practices and policy issues in sport with emphasis on how policy development and strategic planning affect sport organizations, both amateur and professional. FA.

RSM 4100. Financial Management in Recreation and Sport. 3 Hours.

Principles and practices of financial management in recreation and sport settings with emphasis on budgeting, income sources, pricing, fundraising, business planning, and capital projects. FA.

RSM 4200. Professional Development. 1 Hour.

Assists in helping students develop the skills necessary to succeed in the recreation and sport industry. Students will access a variety of professional resources, identify potential employers and graduate programs, and develop specific internship and career goals. FA, SP.

RSM 4400. Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the process of research and evaluations within recreation and sport management. Focuses on research problem identification and literature review as well as designing and implementing tools for systematic gathering of information about programs, personnel, facilities, and potential projects in order to make the best possible administrative decisions. Offered intermittently.

RSM 4620. Senior Seminar. 2 Hours.

Designed to draw on the information and skills developed over the course of the recreation and sport program by reinforcing concepts including foundational theories and philosophies, programming and leadership, and management, operations and marketing. FA.

RSM 4820R. RSM Internship. 3-12 Hours.

Facilitates professional experiences with a cooperating recreation and sport agency. Students must complete a minimum of 400 hours over a 10-week period. Minimum of 6 credit hours is required with a maximum of 12 credits. Course fee required. FA, SP, SU.

Faculty

Department Chair

Susan Hart, Ph.D.

Assistant Professors

Steve Bui Ph.D.

Travis Ficklin Ph.D.

Joseph Lovell Ed.D.

Instructors

Kelly Smith