Nursing

302 Taylor Health Science Center
(435) 879-4810
http://dixie.edu/health/nursing

To find faculty & staff phone numbers and email addresses, please consult the University Directory.

Program Chair
Vicky O'Neil, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC

Administrative Assistant
Rachel Christ

Advisor
Alice Clegg, MHEd

Advisor
Kaylie Romney, BS

Interim Dean
Patricia Wintch RDH, MSDH

Administrative Specialist
Merilee Gustafson

Program Description

The mission of the Dixie State University Nursing Program is the education of nurses at the associate and baccalaureate levels who are dedicated to excellence in health care. Our goals are to:

  • Provide an innovative and collaborative learning environment.
  • Prepare generalist nurses who can practice in various health care settings.
  • Apply evidence-based practice in educational and clinical settings.
  • Enhance the quality of life of diverse individuals, families, groups, communities, and society.
  • Promote responsibility and commitment to lifelong learning.


Philosophy

As an integral part of Dixie State University, the nursing faculty collectively assumes responsibility for supporting and maintaining the mission and goals of the University. The nursing program contributes to the functioning of Dixie State University as a comprehensive state university by offering nursing education at the Associate of Applied Science Degree and Baccalaureate Degree in nursing levels. Students in the ADN program are eligible to test for state licensure as registered nurses.

The Nursing faculty has defined the following terms as part of their philosophical beliefs regarding nursing and nursing education:

Clients are recipients of nursing care and include individuals, families, groups, communities, and society.

Health is a subjective perception of what makes life meaningful and manageable and is a result of adaptation to life’s immediate experiences to maintain physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and cultural harmony.

Environment is every factor, internal and external, that provides the context for human life. People and their environments are inseparable. The combined influences of the external and internal environments determine state of health.

Nursing is the autonomous and collaborative care of clients using unique knowledge to promote health and adaptation to illness, wellness, disability, and dying. Nursing care is guided by morals, ethics, and advocacy.

Healthcare is a system for the delivery of resources to promote wellness as well as prevent and manage illness.

Associate Degree Nurses (ADN) practice in the roles of care provider, care manager, and member within the discipline of nursing. ADN graduates are registered nurses who provide direct care to clients with complex health needs; adjust care as client situations change; collect and analyze data from clients, families, and other health care resources; formulate appropriate nursing diagnoses; develop and revise plans of care based on client decisions; and collaborate and communicate with clients, families, and other health professionals. ADNs also are accountable for care of their clients, and of those whose care has been delegated to others, including licensed and unlicensed health care workers.

Bachelor of Science Degree Nurses (BSN) are professional nurses who have more extensive opportunities for practice than Associate Degree Nurses. The BSN practices in the role of provider, manager, and coordinator of care as well as functioning as a leader of care teams. BSN graduates use research, information technology, ethical frameworks, political advocacy, and policy making in the provision of care with individuals, families, groups and communities across the lifespan and across the continuum of healthcare environments. The BSN graduate is accountable for his or her own practice and care delegated to others. The BSN is generally a prerequisite for graduate nursing education.

Nursing education is a lifelong process which includes reflection, intellectual challenge, and practice. It encompasses the development of knowledge, skills, and personal and professional values. Nursing education facilitates the learning process through the assimilation of knowledge and the acquisition of eight competencies which include critical thinking, technical skills, therapeutic communication, leadership/management, time management/organization, professional behavior, caring, and the nursing process. A supportive environment for nursing education is one of caring in which all persons are respected, trusted, and nurtured. Through education, the faculty endeavors to develop and enhance learners’ individual growth, professional practice and social responsibility, and leadership in increasingly complex health care environments. Education is the progressive discovery of knowledge and possibility. Our aim is for students to recognize what they do and do not know, and how to acquire what they need to know.

Teaching/learning is a collaborative process in which the nursing instructor, informed by the curriculum, evidence-based nursing practice, and teaching and learning theories facilitates the nursing student preparedness to meet the goals and outcomes of the nursing program and the NLCEX® exam.


Learning Outcomes

The competencies that the student develops across the curriculum are related to the learning outcomes and include:

  • LEADERSHIP requires the personal traits necessary to establish vision & goals; the ability to plan, organize, motivate, manage, execute, delegate, evaluate, use conflict resolution strategies, & collaborate with other members of the interdisciplinary health care team.
  • CRITICAL THINKING is a process of insightful thinking that utilizes multiple dimensions of ones own cognition & collaborates with the interdisciplinary health care team to develop conclusions, solutions, & alternatives to ensure safe nursing practice & quality care.
  • COMMUNICATION is the ability to apply concepts of communication & therapeutic interaction in building & maintaining relationships with clients, families, groups, communities & other members of the health care team.
  • CARING is the essence of nursing. Caring is an altruistic philosophy of moral & ethical commitment toward the protection, promotion & preservation of human dignity & diversity including the recognition & acknowledgment of the value of individuals, families, groups, communities, & other members of the health care team.
  • PROFESSIONAL BEHAVIOR- is characterized by a commitment to the profession of nursing.  Professional behavior involves adherence to standards of nursing practice; accountability for actions & behaviors; & nursing practice within legal, ethical, & regulatory frameworks. 

Location

The Department of Nursing is located in the Russell Taylor Health Science Center near Dixie Regional Medical Center. The Taylor Health Science Center, 78,000 square feet on three floors, houses all of Dixie State University’s Allied Health programs. The Nursing program, located on the third floor, utilizes state-of-the-art classrooms, nursing laboratories, and simulation rooms.

Scholarships

A limited number of Nursing department scholarships are available for students who have been accepted into the nursing program. Recipients must be full-time, undergraduate nursing students in good academic standing. Contact the Financial Aid Office at www.dixie.edu/financial for further information.

Accreditation

The Associate Degree Nursing program has been approved by the Utah Board of Nursing and has been accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc. (ACEN) since 2002. The RN-to-BSN program has been accredited by ACEN since 2010.

ACEN, Inc.
3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850
Atlanta, Georgia 30326
Phone: (404) 975-5000
Fax: (404) 975-5020
www.acenursing.org

Course Prefixes

  • NURS

Admission to Associate of Applied Science degree in Nursing

Applicants must be admitted to Dixie State University. Following this the applicant must complete a separate application to the appropriate Nursing program and submit it during specified application periods.

All prerequisites must be completed before the start of the Associate of Applied Science program. Students must complete all prerequisite courses with a minimum of a “C” grade and have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher in those courses.

For all prerequisite courses EXCEPT Human Anatomy, Human Anatomy Lab, Human Physiology, and Human Physiology Lab there is no expiration for the courses and courses may be repeated more than once. However, the highest grade will be used for scoring the application.

For Human Anatomy, Human Anatomy Lab, Human Physiology and Human Physiology Lab courses must have been completed within 7 years prior to admission, and they may be repeated only once. The highest grade within the 7 year time period, will be used for scoring the application. If neither grade has met the minimum requirement of "C" or higher, the student is ineligible to apply for the ADN program.

Applicants may apply while completing prerequisite courses but they must all be completed before the start of the ADN program. Since the anatomy and physiology courses are weighted in the application scoring, it is recommended that students have at least one of the biological science courses complete at the time of application. In order to maximize your potential for acceptance, it is best to complete both courses.

Space in the program is limited; therefore, admission will be competitive, and applicants will be scored on an objective point procedure that has been strategically set up to predict student success. Currently, forty (40) students are admitted each fall and spring semester. Applicants will be evaluated on the following:

  • Current certified nurse assistant certificate is required.
  • Kaplan® Nursing School Entrance Exam—must be taken during application period. The highest score for a test taken during the past two years will be accepted. 
  • Academic excellence in prerequisite courses as exemplified by grades.
  • Specific health requirements and standards must be met after acceptance into the program but before enrollment in classes.
Prerequisite courses:
BIOL 2320
BIOL 2325
Human Anatomy
and Human Anatomy Lab
5
BIOL 2420
BIOL 2425
Human Physiology
and Human Physiology Lab
4
CHEM 1110Elem General/Organic Chemistry (or higher chemistry course) 14
ENGL 1010Introduction to Writing3
or ENGL 1010D Introduction to Writing
ENGL 2010Interm Writing Selected Topics:3
FSHD 1500Human Development Lifespan3
or PSY 1100 Human Development Through Lifespan
MATH 1040Introduction to Statistics3
1

 CHEM 1115 is co-requisite to CHEM 1110, but not required for program admission.

Admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

Requirements for admission to the BSN program:  Include graduation from an accredited associate degree registered nurse program, current registered nurse license and completion of all nursing courses with a minimum of “C” grade and cumulative GPA of 3.0 in those courses, and personal references. Graduates of DSU ADN program may take the first semester courses, but licensure must be obtained before beginning the second semester and continuing the program.  Refer to www.dixie.edu/health/nursing/ for additional admission requirements and application information.

A previously earned degree may complete some or all of DSU’s General Education requirements. DSU’s General Education requirements must be fulfilled prior to BSN degree completion.

Student Learning Outcomes/Competencies for the ADN Program

  1. Leadership
    1. Identifies individual strengths & areas of needed improvement & utilizes criticism & suggestions to improve nursing practice.

    2. identifies and facilitates interdisciplinary interventions to achieve outcomes.

    3. Delegates care appropriately to other health care workers appropriate to their competence, education & training.

    4. Promotes goals of workplace as to costs, safety & quality client care.

    5. Ensures continuity of care for each assigned client.

    6. Promotes excellence & mentors others, assisting them to increase their knowledge & skills.

    7. Serves as a role model & evaluates colleagues & classmates in their professional actions, abilities, & limitations.

    8. Participates effectively in course & clinical group discussions & post-conferences.

  2. Critical Thinking

    1. Assumes responsibility for own learning, understanding & application of education.

    2. Demonstrates independent & creative application of concepts in the clinical setting & course work & is able to consider alternatives.

    3. Uses creative/critical thinking in applying course material to solve problems & make clinical decisions.

    4. Shows initiative by seeking educational & research opportunities (other that what is required) to expand knowledge.

    5. Utilizes knowledge gained from research, journals, valid Internet sources, & nursing workshops to promote quality improvement & client safety.

    6. Promotes the use of evidence-based practice & current research in nursing care.

    7. Utilizes all steps of the nursing process in the safe administration of medications within scope of practice.

    8. Performs ongoing complete physical, emotional, spirituul & socio-cultural assessment of clients across the lifespan.

    9. Recognizes client problems, & independently determines actual & potential nursing diagnoses.

    10. Develops a comprehensive plan of nursing care with the client to promote positive outcomes.

    11. Establishes priorities for nursing care interventions appropriately & independently.

    12. Independently solicits client input & determines effectiveness of nursing interventions.

    13. Actively & creatively adapts/modifies care to the unique needs of each client.

  3. Communication
    1. Uses appropriate basic comunication skills & therapeutic communication techniques.
    2. receives feedback/criticism from evaluations in an assertive, positive manner & makes necessary improvements to succeed.
    3. communicates assertively & effectively with distressed, anxious, angry or aggressive clients & their family members.
    4. records/documents client information, care & evaluation of care in a clear, concise manner.
    5. Assesses the client's health literacy level & understanding of education provided.
    6. Gives/receives nursing change of shift report in an effective manner.
    7. Manages colleagues & team conflict in assertive & responsible ways.
    8. Independently & assertively reports breech of nursing care standards using the appropriate chain of command.
    9. Utilizes plan of care to overcome barriers to communication: physical, developmental, psychological, emotional, cultural, & language.
  4. Caring
    1. Demonstrates care for clients by giving individualized quality, nursing care.
    2. establishes & maintains relationships of trust with clients & colleagues.
    3. Respects human dignity & cultural diversity.
    4. Promotes & respects values & choices of the client.
    5. Advocates for the client needs & preferences.
  5. Professional Behavior
    1. Follows ANA code of ethical behavior, setting aside personal ethical standards to support the client in their choices & values.
    2. Understands & functions within the scope of practice of the licensed registered nurse in all health care settings.
    3. Independently identifies potential liabilities in individual practice & uses legal safeguards in clinical practice.
    4. Understands the purpose of HIPAA and maintains client confidentiality.
    5. Demonstrates support of professional organization & activities.
    6. Identifies & follows established patient care standards & cautiuosly performs all skills with accuracy.
    7. Observes all OSHA standards, rules & regulations.

Student Learning Outcomes for the BSN Program

The BSN graduate will:

  1. Apply leadership concepts, skills, and decision making in order to provide oversight and accountability for the delivery of safe, quality care in a variety of healthcare settings.
  2. Integrate reliable evidence from multiple perspectives to inform practice and make reasonable clinical judgments.
  3. Demonstrate skills in using patient care technologies, information systems, and communication devices that support safe nursing practice in a variety of healthcare settings.
  4. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of healthcare policy, finance, and regulatory environments including local, state, national, and global healthcare trends.
  5. Communicate, collaborate, and negotiate as a member and leader within interdisciplinary healthcare teams to improve patient health outcomes.
  6. Manage the direct and indirect care of individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations to promote, maintain and restore health.
  7. Integrate professional standards of moral, ethical, and legal conduct in the care of persons, families, groups, communities, and populations.

The Department of Nursing offers two levels of nursing education. The Associate Degree Nursing program prepares students to assume the role of registered nurse. Graduates of this program will receive an Associate of Applied Science degree and are eligible for Registered Nurse licensure upon successful completion of the NCLEX-RN® licensure examination.

The RN-to-Baccalaureate Degree Nursing program is designed to provide Registered Nurses with further education necessary for progression in their careers, entrance into management positions, and admission into graduate nursing programs leading to advanced practice nursing, nursing education, and nursing administration. Graduates will receive a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree.

Career Opportunities

Registered Nurse

Career Opportunities*

Over the 2014-2024 decade, employment of registered nurses is expected to increase by 16%, above the average for all occupations. This growth is for a number of reasons, including the fact that the older generation will need more care as it ages, and that more people than ever have access to health insurance, and more registered nurses will be needed to accommodate them.

Salary Range*

In May 2015, the median annual wage for registered nurses was $67,490. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $46,360, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $101,630. When employed by the government, registered nurses earned $72,100; in hospitals (state, local, and private), RN’s earned $69,510; in home healthcare services they earned $63,840; in physicians’ offices they earned $60,820; and in nursing and residential care facilities, they earned $60,370.

Nurse Assistant

Career Opportunities*

More than half of the 1.5 million nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants in the U.S. work in residential care facilities / nursing homes. Almost 20% work in hospitals, and the remainder are employed either in home health or hiring / training other nurse assistant. The job of a nurse assistant can be both physically and emotionally demanding but can offer personal fulfillment. Working as a nurse assistant is an excellent introduction to the field of health care for individuals considering pursuing an education to become a registered nurse or other health care provider. In Utah, nurse assistants must be certified by the Utah State CNA Registry, a process that includes passing both a skills test and a written exam.

Job Outlook*

Employment of nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants is expected to grow 18% between 2014 and 2024, which is faster than the average for all occupations, but increases are linked to government funding for Medicare and other agencies upon which long-term care facilities depend. The growth is due to the increasing number of elderly Americans.

Salary Range*

The median annual wage for full time nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants was $25,710 in May 2015, and many part-time employment opportunities exist.

* Derived from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2015

Courses

NURS 1001. FYE: Nursing. 1 Hour.

A First Year Experience course designed to help entering freshmen and transfer students with 0-24 credits majoring in nursing adapt to college life and become integrated into Dixie State University. Students will refine academic skills, create and foster social networks, learn about college resources, and explore the field of nursing. Multiple listed with all other sections of First Year Experience. Students may only take one FYE course for credit. FA.

NURS 1005. Certified Nursing Assistant. 4 Hours.

Prepares students in the knowledge, skills, and responsibilities required for certification as a nursing assistant by the state of Utah. Course fee required. Corequisite: NURS 1007. FA, SP, SU.

NURS 1007. Nursing Assistant Clinical. 0 Hours.

Clinical portion of NURS 1005. Provides hands on clinical training in the long term care setting to reinforce nurse assistant skills learned in classroom and laboratory. A minimum of 24 clinical hours required. Corequisite: NURS 1005. FA, SP, SU.

NURS 2000. Intro to Health Concepts. 4 Hours.

First semester course. Introduces health concepts within the three domains of the client, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on an introduction to the concepts of fluid and electrolytes, elimination, thermoregulation, oxygenation, inflammation, tissue integrity, infection, sensory and perception, mobility, comfort, safety, stress and coping, grief and loss, cognition, self, family, diversity, culture, spirituality, critical thinking, and nursing process. Includes classroom and clinical experiences. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. Offered in cohort rotation. FA, SP.

NURS 2001. Intro to Health Concepts Clinical. 0 Hours.

First semester course. Provides opportunity for student to learn, practice, and achieve clinical competency using concept based clinical skills. Students have the opportunity to complete these clinical skills in long-term based facilities, hospital based affiliates, and with simulation in the laboratory setting. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. Offered in cohort rotation.

NURS 2005. Nursing Skills Laboratory. 2 Hours.

First semester course. Provides opportunity for students to learn, practice, and achieve competency in basic nursing skills including but not limited to physical assessment, sterile technique, peripheral intravenous insertion, medication administration, blood administration, and wound care. Course fee reqired. Corequisite: NURS 2000. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. Offered in cohort rotation.

NURS 2400. Health & Illness Concepts I. 5 Hours.

First semester course. Further develops health and illness concepts within the three domains of the client, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of acid-base, metabolism, cellular regulation, oxygenation, infection, stress and coping, health-wellness-illness, therapeutic communication, caring, technical skills, time management/organization, critical thinking, nursing process, safety, quality improvement, and informatics. Includes classroom, lab, and clinical learning experiences. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. FA, SP.

NURS 2401. Health & Illness Concepts I Clinical. 0 Hours.

First semester course. Clinical opportunities are offered at an increased level of instruction for student to learn, practice, and achieve clinical competency using concept based clinical skills. Students have the opportunity to complete these clinical skills in long-term based facilities, hospital based affiliates, and with simulation in the laboratory setting. Offered in cohort rotation. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. FA, SP.

NURS 2450. Nursing Pharmacology Concepts I. 2 Hours.

First semester course. Provides an introduction to concepts of pharmacology for nurses within the three domains of the client, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of assessment, therapeutic communication, critical thinking, nursing process, caring, safety, and accountability and their application in various healthcare settings. Offered in cohort rotation. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. FA, SP.

NURS 2500. Health & Illness Concepts II. 8 Hours.

Second semester course. Further develops health and illness concepts within the three domains of the client, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of elimination, metabolism, intracranial regulation, cellular regulation, perfusion, infection, immunity, mobility, comfort, behavior, health-wellness-illness, critical thinking, nursing process, caring, time management/organization, leadership/management, and safety. Includes application of pharmacological health and illness concepts in acute care settings. Includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. FA, SP.

NURS 2501. Health & Illness Concepts II Clinical. 0 Hours.

This course is offered in the second semester in the ADN program. It further develops health and illness concepts within the three domains of the client, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of metabolism, intracranial regulation, cellular regulation, perfusion, infection, immunity, mobility, comfort, behavior, health-wellness-illness, critical thinking, nursing process, caring, time management/organization, leadership/management, and safety. The course includes application of pharmacological health and illness concepts in acute care settings. It includes clinical learning experiences. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. FA, SP.

NURS 2530. Family Health Concepts. 5 Hours.

Second semester course. Further develops health and illness concepts within the three domains of the client, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of oxygenation, thermoregulation, sexuality, reproduction, infection, grief and loss, mood and affect, behavior, development, family, critical thinking, and nursing process. Includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. Offered in cohort rotation. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing Program. FA, SP.

NURS 2531. Family Health Concepts Clinical. 0 Hours.

Second semester course. Provides the opportunity for students to learn, practice, and achieve clinical competency in the clinical skills developed in the laboratory setting. Students have the opportunity to implement clinical skills in specialty areas learned in Family Health Concepts. The student attends these clinicals in hospital based affiliates as well as in community settings which provides skill development in all areas of nursing, including care of the perinatal patient and child. Offered in cohort rotation. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. FA, SP.

NURS 2600. Health Care Systems. 2 Hours.

Third semester course. Further develops student learning outcomes/competencies. An emphasis is placed on Leadership, Critical Thinking, Communication, Caring and Professional Behavior of the graduate nurse. Offered in cohort rotation. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. FA, SP.

NURS 2700. Complex Health&Illness Concept. 9 Hours.

Third semester course. Assimilates concepts within the three domains of the client, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of fluid and electrolytes, metabolism, thermoregulation, oxygenation, perfusion, tissue integrity, infection, mobility, stress and coping, family, violence, critical thinking, and the nursing process. Addresses application of complex health and illness concepts in nursing pharmacology. Includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. Course fee required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. SP '12, FA '12.

NURS 2701. Complex Health Concepts Clinical. 0 Hours.

Third semester course. Provides student the opportunity to work with preceptors to further develop the clinical skill needed for a graduate nurse. The student has the opportunity to learn, practice and master skills previously learned. Students are assigned to a hospital based affiliate, community setting experiences, and the simulation laboratory setting. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. Offered in cohort rotation.

NURS 2750. NCLEX Success Course. 2 Hours.

Third semester course. Builds on previously learned nursing pharmacology concepts in preparation for entry into nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of safety, critical thinking, technical skills, nursing process, and evidence-based practice in providing nursing care related to the administration of pharmacological and parenteral therapies in patients across the lifespan. The course also includes a review of nursing licensure by examination requirements. The eight test plan categories of the NCLEX-RN examination including management of care, safety and infection control, health promotion and maintenance, psychosocial integrity, basic care and comfort, reduction of risk potential, pharmacological and parenteral therapies, and physiological adaptation will be reviewed in detail. Offered in cohort rotation. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Associate Degree in Nursing program. FA, SP.

NURS 3100. Professional Nursing Roles. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the transition to professional nursing role and responsibilities and explores the differences in ADN and BSN education and practice levels by exploring the roles of the BSN nurse in the health care environment, including nurse educator, nurse leader, case manager, and community health nurse. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dixie State University Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. SP, SU.

NURS 3200. Health Assessment. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the development of interviewing and physical assessment skills throughout the lifespan utilizing a holistic approach and critical thinking skills to evaluate assessment findings, differentiate between normal and abnormal variations. Purchase of electronic access is required to navigate this online course. Prerequisites: BIOL 4400; and NURS 3100 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA, SP.

NURS 3300. Transcultural Nursing. 3 Hours.

An approved Global and Cultural Perspectives course. Prepares professional nursing students to provide culturally sensitive and culturally competent care to individuals, families, and communities, emphasizing the importance of understanding cultural diversity in order to promote appropriate health prevention, disease intervention activities, and teaching strategies. Includes self-evaluation, including biases and prejudices about other cultures and ethnic groups. Prerequisite: NURS 3100 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA, SP, SU.

NURS 3312. Foundations of Clinical Nursing Care I. 2 Hours.

Provides opportunity for students to learn, practice, and achieve competency in basic nursing skills including but not limited to sterile technique, medication administration, and wound care. Prerequisite: Admission to the DSU Bachelor of Science Nursing program. FA, SP.

NURS 3400. Nursing Informatics. 3 Hours.

Introduces informatics in nursing practice, education, research, and administration, exploring how informatics systems can be utilized to assist in providing more efficient and effective client care, including hardware, software, databases, new developments, and associated legal and ethical issues. Prerequisite: Admission to the DSU Bachelor of Science in Nursing program and NURS 3100 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA, SP, SU.

NURS 3600. Nursing Research. 3 Hours.

Introduces quantitative and qualitative research concepts, methodology, and techniques, addressing the scientific approach; preliminary steps in research design, measurement, and data collection; analysis of data; and critiquing. Emphasizes the relationship between research and the practice of professional nursing. Prerequisites: MATH 1040, or STAT 2040, AND NURS 3100 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA, SP, SU.

NURS 3700. Gerontological Nursing. 3 Hours.

Focuses on nursing care of the older adult by exposure to best practices for care of the older adult; issues such as quality of life, elder abuse, cultural considerations, and restraint alternatives; normal physiologic changes of aging; pathological disease processes; cognitive and psychological changes; end-of-life care; and environments of care for the older adult. Prerequisite: NURS 3100 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA, SP, SU.

NURS 3990. Seminar in Nursing. 0.5-3 Hours.

For students wishing instruction that is not available through other regularly scheduled courses in this discipline. Occasionally, either students request some type of non-traditional instruction, or an unanticipated opportunity for instruction presents itself. This seminar course provides a variable credit context for these purposes. As requirements, this seminar course must first be pre-approved by the department chair; second, it must provide at least nine contact hours of lab or lecture for each credit hour offered; and third, it must include some academic project or paper (i.e., credit is not given for attendance alone). This course may include standard lectures, travel and field trips, guest speakers, laboratory exercises, or other non-traditional instruction methods. Note that this course is an elective and does not fulfill general education or program requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

NURS 4020. Community Health Nursing. 5 Hours.

Prepares the baccalaureate student to function within the scope of professional nursing practice in the care of individuals, families, and groups in the community with emphasis placed on family assessment, community assessment, health promotion, health maintenance, and disease prevention. Past, present, and future community service trends are explored and analyzed. Includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. Prerequisites: NURS 3100 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA, SP.

NURS 4030. Nursing Policy & Ethics. 3 Hours.

Addresses policy development, political influences and power, and nursing's involvement in the policy-making process. Legislation past and present, as well as ethical theories, frameworks, and the process of ethical inquiry are examined, explored, and analyzed as a basis for professional nursing practice, education, research, and decision-making. Prerequisite: NURS 3100. FA, SP.

NURS 4040. Nursing Leadership Management. 5 Hours.

Explores the role of the professional nurse as a leader and manager of patient care by exploring strategies, processes, and techniques of the nurse leader and manager as well as theories, principles, and application of leadership and management within the professional nursing role. Prerequisite: NURS 3100 (can be concurrently enrolled). FA, SP.

NURS 4600. Senior Capstone. 6 Hours.

Allows the student to select an area of interest and have an intensive experience focused on nursing leadership, research, and/or clinical practice. Student portfolios are used to design an individual learning experience in which students will integrate the role of the professional nurse with previous knowledge and experience. Students will meet the college requirement of 45 work hours per credit. Prerequisites: NURS 3100, NURS 3200, NURS 3300, NURS 3400, NURS 3600, NURS 3700, NURS 4020, NURS 4030, and NURS 4040 (can be taken concurrently). FA, SP, SU.

Faculty

Department Chair

Vicky O'Neil, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC

Program Coordinators

Michelle McDermott, Phd(c) - BSN

DeAnne Larsen, Phd(c) - ADN

Advisors

Alice Clegg, MHEd (Last Names A-J)

Kaylie Romney, BS (Last Names K-Z)

Associate Professors

Vicky O'Neil, DNP

Julie Chew, PhD

DeAnne Larsen, PhD(c), CPN

Michelle McDermott, PhD(c)

Kathy Rasmussen, MSN

Assistant Professors

Kindra Celani, MSN

Mark Olson, MSN

Tiffany Petersen, PhD(c)

Judy Scott, MSN

Department Secretary

Rachel Christ